Select Page
The Interpreter Foundation
Alphabetical by Author

See the icons used for the links to the available media types for an article

Citations with multiple authors are listed multiple times, once under each author’s name

A

Welch, John W., and Jackson Abhau. “The Priestly Interests of Moses the Levite.” In Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, Volume 1. Edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon, 163–256. Orem, UT; Springville, UT; Redding, CA; Tooele, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, and Eborn Books, 2021.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Joseph Smith Translation (JST) > Historicity and Ancient Threads — General Issues
Book of Moses Topics > Temple Themes in the Book of Moses and Related Scripture
Book of Moses Topics > Literary and Textual Studies of the Book of Moses
Book of Moses Topics > Source Criticism and the Documentary Hypothesis
ID = [4640]  Status = Type = book chapter  Date = 2021-08-02  Collections:  interpreter-website,moses,welch  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Addams, R. Jean. “Aftermath of the Martyrdom: The Aspirants to the Mantle of Joseph Smith and the Leadership of Brigham Young in the Months Following the Martyrdom.” “A Life Lived in Crescendo” Firesides. The Interpreter Foundation YouTube channel. November 28, 2021.
Display Abstract  

Feelings of foreboding were experienced by some members of the Quorum of the Twelve while serving missions in the northeastern states on June 27, 1844, the day the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were assassinated. Their promptings led them to return to Nauvoo in haste. We will discuss Sidney Rigdon’s efforts to assume guardianship of the Church in August 1844 and Brigham Young’s resounding response. Then, we will explore the various claims and results of efforts by several aspirants to claim the mantle of the deceased Prophet Joseph. Next, we will examine the solidifying influence of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, led by their president Brigham Young. Finally, I will recount the resulting exodus of the majority of the Saints from western Illinois to Iowa in early 1846. Young continued to deal with the “scattering” of certain individuals and their adherents for several more years and was required to provide the counsel and direction to those apostles that were assigned to facilitate the trek westward from Kanesville in the years that followed.

ID = [6971]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2021-11-28  Collections:  brigham,interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:52
Addams, R. Jean. “The Past and Future of the Temple Lot in Independence, Jackson County, Missouri.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 44 (2021): 145-216.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Fifteen months after the Church of Christ’s inception in April 1830, Joseph Smith received a revelation indicating that Independence, Jackson County, Missouri, was to be the “center-place” of Zion and a “spot for a temple is lying westward, upon a lot that is not far from the court-house.” Dedication of this spot for the millennial temple soon followed on August 3, 1831, by Joseph Smith and Sidney Rigdon. A building sketch was prepared in Kirtland, Ohio, and sent to church leaders in Independence in June 1833. Smith also forwarded his plat for the City of Zion, showing 24 temples at its center and giving an explanation for their use. Tragically, the church was driven en masse out of Jackson County only months later. Reclaiming the original Partridge purchase in December 1831, known as the Temple Lot, became an early driving force for the membership of the church. A physical effort to reclaim the saints’ land and possessions in Jackson County was organized in 1834 by Joseph Smith and became known as “Zion’s Camp.” After traveling 900 miles and poised on the north bank of the Missouri River looking toward Jackson County, Smith’s two hundred armed men were unable to proceed for various reasons. While contemplating what to do, given the reality of their situation, Smith received a revelation to “wait for a little season, for the redemption of Zion.” That poignant phrase — “the redemption of Zion” — became a tenet of the church thereafter. In the years following the martyrdom and the subsequent “scattering of the saints,” three independent expressions of the Restoration returned to Independence to reclaim or redeem the Temple Lot in fulfillment of latter-day scripture. This essay examines their historical efforts.
[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.
See R. Jean Addams, “The Past and Future of the Temple Lot in Independence, Jackson County, Missouri,” in Proceedings of the Fifth Interpreter Foundation Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference, 7 November 2020, ed. Stephen D. Ricks and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Temple on Mount Zion 6 (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2021), in preparation. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/the-temple-past-present-and-future/.].

ID = [3418]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 64829  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Addams, R. Jean. “The Past and Future of the Temple Lot in Jackson County, Missouri.” Paper presented at the 2020 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. November 7, 2020.
ID = [6783]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-11-07  Collections:  interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:51
Addams, R. Jean. “True to the End: The Culmination of the Ministry of Joseph Smith at His Martyrdom.” “A Life Lived in Crescendo” Firesides. The Interpreter Foundation YouTube channel. June 27, 2021.
Display Abstract  

This fireside will begin by describing the premonitions of Joseph Smith about his impending death in the years preceding his tragic martyrdom. We will review the series of circumstances that led to his and his brother Hyrum’s demise at the hands of the mob that stormed the jail in Carthage. The little-known story of Joseph and Hyrum being rowed across the Mississippi River in the very early hours of the Sunday prior to their fateful trip to Carthage to consider options and secure legal counsel while out of the reach of his enemies will be told. The story demonstrates the devotion of the Prophet to his people and to the incredibly challenging destiny God had appointed for him. It further demonstrates the love of the Smith family and the Saints for their son, husband, brother, and friend. In all these events, the hand of God was clearly present during the tragedy and eventual triumph of the Prophet’s mission as a witness of Jesus Christ and His Restored Church.

ID = [6977]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2021-06-27  Collections:  interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:52
Alexander, Thomas G. “God, Humankind, and Eternal Progression: Brigham Young and Church Doctrine.” In Steadfast in Defense of Faith: Essays in Honor of Daniel C. Peterson, eds. Ricks, Shirley S., Stephen D. Ricks, and Louis C. Midgley. Orem and Salt Lake City, UT: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2023.
ID = [77308]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2023-08-01  Collections:  brigham,interpreter-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:33
Andersen, M. Steven. “The Practice and Meaning of Declaring Lineage in Patriarchal Blessings.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 46 (2021): 209-232.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In this paper, I show that declarations of lineage in patriarchal blessings have, since the earliest days of the Restoration, evolved in terms of frequency of inclusion, which tribal lineages predominate, and understanding of the meaning of the declaration. I argue for a non- literal understanding consistent with scripture and science, but posit that these declarations have deep and important significance in connection with the gathering of Israel.

ID = [3389]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 56492  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Howell, Scott L., Brooke Anderson, LaReina Hingson, Lanna McRae, Jesse Vincent, and Brandon Torruella. “The Diachronic Usage of Exclamation Marks across the Major Book of Mormon Editions.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 53 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 53 (2022): 265-286.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: The usage of the exclamation mark has changed over time but continues to serve as an important textual interpretation aid. Punctuation itself has not been a permanent fixture in English, rather it was slowly introduced to English documents with changing standard usages after the invention of the printing press. Here we highlight the use of the exclamation mark across major editions of the Book of Mormon and document the presence of the exclamation mark in a reference table.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; exclamation mark; textual analysis
ID = [81258]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 42167  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:12
Anderson, Carli. “Enthroning the Daughter of Zion: The Coronation Motif of Isaiah 60-62.” Paper presented at the 2014 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. October 25, 2014.
Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Isaiah
ID = [6862]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2014-10-25  Collections:  interpreter-website,old-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:51
Anderson, Rick. “Addressing Prickly Issues.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 23 (2017): 253-261.
Display Abstract  

Review of A Reason for Faith: Navigating LDS Doctrine & Church History, ed. Laura Harris Hales. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book; Provo, UT: BYU Religious Studies Center, 2016. 264 pp. $24.99.
Abstract: This collection of essays conveniently assembles faithful and rigorous treatments of difficult questions related to LDS history and doctrine. While two or three of the essays are sufficiently flawed to give cause for concern and while some of its arguments have been expressed differently in earlier publications, overall this book can be confidently recommended to interested and doctrinally mature Latter-day Saints.

ID = [3716]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  d-c,interpreter-journal  Size: 20949  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Anderson, Rick. “Mormonism and Intellectual Freedom.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 10 (2014): 161-173.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: To many outside the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (and to some of its members), the Church’s teachings and practices appear not only socially and experientially constraining, but intellectually restrictive as well, given its centralized system of doctrinal boundary maintenance and its history of sometimes sanctioning members who publicly dissent from its teachings. Do these practices amount to a constraint of intellectual freedom? This essay argues that they do not, and offers several possible explanations for the commonly-asserted position that they do.

ID = [4299]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2014-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 23923  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Anderson, Rick. “Mormonism, Materialism, and Politics: Six Things We Must Understand in Order to Survive as Latter-day Saints.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 21 (2016): 239-248.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: We are called as Latter-day Saints to be a force for good in the world in every way possible, which necessarily includes active and positive engagement with political and social issues. At the same time, it is essential to our spiritual survival that we never allow ourselves to forget the radical difference between the philosophies of men — no matter how superficially harmonious some of these may seem with particular principles of the gospel or with some aspects of traditional Mormon culture — and the teachings of the prophets. In a world that constantly entices us with messages designed to lure us away from the eternal truths of the restored gospel and into the embrace of philosophies that are partially and contingently true at best and actively destructive at worst, we must exercise constant vigilance. This essay suggests and discusses six propositions that, if understood and embraced, should help us maintain that vigilance.

ID = [3737]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 21852  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Arp, Nathan J. “An Analysis of Mormon’s Narrative Strategies Employed on the Zeniffite Narrative and Their Effect on Limhi.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 59 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 59 (2023): 159-190.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: The prophet Mormon’s editorial skill brings the narrative of the Zeniffites alive with a complex tumble of viewpoints, commentary, and timelines. Mormon seems to apply similar narrative strategies as those used in the Bible in his approach to abridging the history of his people. A comparative reading of the various accounts in the Zeniffite story provides the close reader with a deep picture of Limhi, the tragic grandson of the founding king, Zeniff, and the son of the iniquitous King Noah. Noah’s wicked rule brought his people into bondage. His conflicted son Limhi’s efforts to free the people, although well meaning, often imperiled his people. Fortunately, Limhi’s proclivity for making poor judgments did not extend to his acceptance of the gospel. In fact, coexistent with the repeated errors Limhi makes in the narrative lies one of his greatest strengths, his willingness to accept correction. This is a vital characteristic necessary for the repentance required by the gospel of Jesus Christ. This is what redeemed Limhi from his comedy of errors. It is this quality that can also redeem us all. Limhi’s love for his father, in the end, did not doom him to make the same mistakes Noah did. When the messengers from God came, Limhi listened and accepted their message. Mormon’s characterization strategies described here are a credit to his art and support the hypothesis that he is an inheritor of the poetics of biblical narrative. His narrative strategies not only characterize the cast in his narrative, but also characterize him. The care Mormon took in crafting his abridgment reveal his observational prowess. He saw God’s hand in his people’s history, and he went to great lengths to teach his readers how to see it too. His characterization of Limhi is a personal message about how wickedness and tyranny affect individuals.

Keywords: Alma; Book of Mormon; Limhi; Mormon; Mosiah
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
ID = [81881]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 80277  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:16
Arp, Nathan J. “Count Your Many Mormons: Mormon’s Personalized and Personal Messages in Mosiah 18 and 3 Nephi 5.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 41 (2020): 75-86.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The present work analyzes the narrative art Mormon employs, specifically Mormon’s unique strategies for personalized and personal messaging, which can be seen in how Mormon connects the narration of the baptism at the waters of Mormon in Mosiah chapter 18 with his self- introductory material in 3 Nephi chapter 5. In these narratives, Mormon seems to simultaneously present an overt personalized message about Christ and a covert personal connection to Alma1 through the almost excessive repetition of his own name. Mormon discreetly plants evidence to suggest his intention for the careful re-reader to discover that Mormon was a 12th generation descendant of the first Alma. Mormon’s use of personalizing and personal messages lends emotive power to his narratives and shines a light on Mormon’s love for Christ’s church.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
Book of Mormon Topics > Persons and Peoples > Mormon
Book of Mormon Topics > Places > Americas > Book of Mormon Geography > Waters of Mormon
ID = [3450]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 25623  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Arp, Nathan J. “Joseph Knew First: Moses, the Egyptian Son.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 32 (2019): 187-198.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: After about 1500 years of slumber, ancient Egyptian was brought back to life in the early 19th century, when scholars deciphered hieroglyphs. This revolutionary success opened the door to a reevaluation of history from the viewpoint of ancient Egypt. In the wake of this new knowledge, the first scholar posited the idea in 1849 that the name of Moses stemmed from the Egyptian word for child. Subsequently, this idea was refined, and currently the majority of scholars believe Moses’s name comes from the Egyptian verb “to beget,” which is also the root for the Egyptian word for child, or in the case of a male child, a “son.” Before this discovery and certainly before a scholarly consensus formed on the Egyptian etymology of the name of Moses, Joseph Smith restored a prophecy from the patriarch Joseph that played upon the name of Moses and its yet to be discovered Egyptian meaning of “son.” This article explores the implications of this overt Egyptian pun and its role as a key thematic element in the restored narratives in the Book of Moses.

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Old Testament Scriptures > Exodus
ID = [3578]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 31034  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Arp, Nathan J. “Mormon’s Narrative Strategies to Provide Literary Justice for Gideon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 58 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 58 (2023): 167-222.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: Although unable to write more than a hundredth part of his people’s history, Mormon seemingly found the time and plate-space to deliver literary justice on behalf of Gideon, who suffered a martyr’s death at the hand of the wicked Nehor. This article applies a literary approach buttressed by evidence from the Book of Mormon to suggest that Mormon intentionally supplied tightly-controlled repetitive elements, like the repetition of names, to point the reader to discover multiple literary sub-narratives connected by a carefully crafted network of themes running under the main narratives of the scriptures. The theories espoused in this work may have begun with the recognition of the reader-arresting repetition of Gideon’s name in Alma 6:7-8, but driven by scriptural data points soon connected Gideon with Abinadi, the Ammonites, and others. The repetitive and referential use of the moniker Nehor, Gideon’s murderer, on various peoples by Mormon seemed to connect thematically and organically to a justice prophesied by Abinadi. In parallel with the theme of justice laid upon the Nehor-populations, evidence is marshaled to also suggest that Mormon referenced the place-name of Gideon to intentionally hearken back to the man Gideon. Following the role of Gideon, as a place, we propose Mormon constructed a path for the martyr Gideon via proxy to meet the resurrected Lord in Bountiful. Mormon’s concern for the individual and his technique for rewriting Gideon’s story through proxy ultimately symbolizes the role Christ’s atoning power can take in each of our lives to save us.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; Gideon; Mormon; narrative strategies; repetition
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
ID = [81203]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 144707  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:11
Ashton, Alan C. “Easters: The Eternal Atoning Sacrifice Testifies of the Everlasting Redeeming Savior.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 28 (2018): 237-256.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Easters come year after year, reminding us of new life brought to the children of men by the eternal atoning sacrifice of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. He grants us peace, forgiveness, grace, mercy, contentment, and joy in our hearts, and thus we gratefully testify of our everlasting redeeming Savior. All things bear witness of Jesus Christ. The Lord spoke thus face-to-face with Moses upon a high mountain: “And behold, all things have their likeness, and all things are created and made to bear record of me, both things which are temporal, and things which are spiritual; things which are in the heavens above, and things which are on the earth, and things which are in the earth, and things which are under the earth, both above and beneath: all things bear record of me.”
The intent of this article is to discuss scriptures that bear testimony of the reality of the Lord’s infinite atonement, to express deep gratitude for our Savior, and to praise Him for His grace, mercy, wisdom, power, and holiness.

ID = [3652]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 48009  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Jordan, Benjamin R., and Warren P. Aston. “The Geology of Moroni’s Stone Box: Examining the Setting and Resources of Palmyra.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 30 (2018): 233-252.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The story of Joseph Smith retrieving gold plates from a stone box on a hillside in upstate New York and translating them into the foundational text of the Restoration is well known among Latter-day Saints. While countless retellings have examined these events in considerable detail, very few have explored the geological aspects involved in this story. In particular, none have discussed in detail the geological materials that would have been required by the Nephite prophet Moroni ca. ad 421 to construct a sealed container able to protect the gold plates from the elements and from premature discovery for some fourteen centuries. This paper reports the outcomes from a field investigation into what resources would have been available to Moroni in the Palmyra area. It was conducted by the authors in New York state in October 2017.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [3615]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 29854  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Aston, Warren P. “Nephi’s ‘Bountiful’: Contrasting Both Candidates.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 55 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 55 (2023): 219-268.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Readers should be aware that both Khor Kharfot and Wadi Sayq are now protected sites under Omani law. Neither area can be visited without a permit issued by the government of Oman. They are not accessible by road at any point. Please contact the author if further clarification is needed. Abstract: In May 2022, George Potter published an article that makes the most comprehensive case to date that Khor Rori in southern Oman is the most likely location for the place “Bountiful” described by Nephi. However, despite its many positives, there are a number of reasons to question the suitability of Khor Rori and to favor the other major candidate for Bountiful, Khor Kharfot. I propose that a careful reading of Nephi’s account coupled with recent discoveries based on field work show Khor Kharfot to be a superior candidate meeting all criteria we can extract from the text. To support a thorough comparison, aspects of both candidates are weighed, including pictorial comparisons of key features. I am in full agreement with Potter that with the entire eastern coast of Arabia now explored, only two candidates for Bountiful remain in contention — Khor Rori and Khor Kharfot. No other location still merits serious consideration.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; Bountiful; Khor Kharfot; Khor Rori; Nephi
ID = [81233]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 89408  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:12
Aston, Warren P. “Nephi’s ‘Shazer’: The Fourth Arabian Pillar of the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 39 (2020): 53-72.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Many Book of Mormon students are aware that several locations along Lehi’s Trail through the Arabian Peninsula now have surprising and impressive evidence of plausibility, including the River Laman, Valley of Lemuel, Nahom, and Bountiful. One specific named location that has received much less attention is Shazer, a brief hunting stop mentioned in only two verses. After reviewing the potential etymology of the name, Warren Aston provides new information from discoveries made during field work in late 2019 at the prime candidate for the Valley of Lemuel, discoveries that lead to new understanding about the path to Shazer. Contrary to previous assumptions about Lehi’s journey, Aston shows there was no need to backtrack through the Valley of Lemuel to begin the “south-southeast” journey toward Shazer. It appears that Nephi’s description of crossing the river from the family’s campsite and then going south-southeast toward Shazer is exactly what can be done from the most likely candidate for a campsite in the most likely candidate for the Valley of Lemuel. In light of fieldwork and further information, Aston also reviews the merits of several locations that have been proposed for Shazer and points to a fully plausible, even probable, location for Shazer. The account of Shazer, like Nahom, the River of Laman/Valley of Lemuel, and Bountiful, may now be a fourth Arabian pillar anchoring and supporting the credibility of the Book of Mormon’s Old World account.
And it came to pass that we did take our tents
and depart into the wilderness, across the river Laman.
And it came to pass that we traveled for the space of four days,
nearly a south-southeast direction,
and we did pitch our tents again;
and we did call the name of the place Shazer.
And it came to pass that we did take our bows and our arrows,
and go forth into the wilderness to slay food for our families;
and after we had slain food for our families
we did return again to our families in the wilderness,
to the place of Shazer.
—1 Nephi 16:12-14.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Topics > Places > Ancient Near East > Arabia > Shazer
ID = [3480]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 27235  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Aston, Warren P. “A Research Note: Continuing Exploration and Research in Oman.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 53 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 53 (2022): 255-264.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: The significance of the ongoing studies into the potential location of the Old World “Bountiful,” which Nephi reminds us was “prepared of the Lord” (1 Nephi 17:5), and is documented in great detail by him, can hardly be overstated. Bountiful’s resources had to be truly substantial and unique to enable the Lehites to recover from years of land travel from Jerusalem and to build a ship capable of reaching the New World. Exploration and scientific studies of the Dhofar region of southern Oman, the only section of the Arabian coast containing the feature Nephi describes, continue to the present. Here I briefly discuss, chronologically, recent developments of special significance to Book of Mormon studies.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; Bountiful; Dhofar; Old World geography
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
ID = [81257]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 15195  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:12
Atwood, Ryan. “Lehi’s Dream and the Plan of Salvation.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 37 (2020): 141-162.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Lehi’s dream symbolically teaches us about many aspects of Heavenly Father’s plan of salvation. The central message of Lehi’s dream is that all must come unto Jesus Christ in order to be saved. Each of us has the choice to pursue the path that leads to eternal joy and salvation or to choose a different way and experience undesirable outcomes. In this paper, elements of Lehi’s dream and supporting scriptures are analyzed to see how they relate to key aspects of the plan of salvation and our journey through life.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Topics > Doctrines and Teachings > Plan of Salvation
ID = [3512]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 51225  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57

B

Bailey, David H., and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Science and Mormonism.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 19 (2016): 17-37.
Display Abstract  

Editor’s Note: In celebration of the long-awaited publication of the expanded proceedings of the 2013 Interpreter Science and Mormonism Symposium — Cosmos, Earth, and Man (Orem and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2016), we share an expanded version of the introduction to that volume in this issue of the journal. The second Interpreter Science and Mormonism Symposium, subtitled Body, Brain, Mind, and Spirit, will be held at Utah Valley University in Orem, Utah in the Classroom Building, Room 101, from 8:30 am-3:30 pm on March 12, 2016. For more information about the book and the upcoming symposium, see MormonInterpreter.com.
Abstract: From the beginning, Latter-day Saints have rejected the notion that science and religion are incompatible. In this article, we give an overview of studies that have surveyed the professional participation of Mormons in science and the views of American academics and scientists on religion in general, Mormons in particular, and why many thoughtful people in our day might be disinclined to take religion seriously. We conclude with a brief survey of current LDS perspectives on science. Our brief survey demonstrates that it is not only futile for religion and science to battle each other; it is also unnecessary. .

ID = [3757]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-journal  Size: 44402  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bailey, David H., Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, John H. Lewis, Gregory L. Smith, and Michael L. Stark, eds. Science and Mormonism: Cosmos, Earth, and Man. Interpreter Science and Mormonism Symposia 1. Orem and Salt Lake City, UT: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2016.
Display Abstract  

This book features the personal perspectives of prominent LDS scientists addressing the theme of “Cosmos, Earth, and Man.” Many of these were drawn from the first Interpreter Symposium on Science and Mormonism, held in Provo, Utah on 9 November 2013. In the pages of this book, readers will appreciate the concise and colorful summaries of the state-of-the-art in scientific research relating to these topics and will gain a deeper appreciation of the unique contributions of LDS doctrine to the ongoing conversation.

Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Basic Resources > Perspectives on Science and the Book of Moses
ID = [4501]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 1277329  Children: 1  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:01
Bailey, David H. “Science vs. Religion: Can This Marriage Be Saved?” Paper presented at The 2013 Interpreter Symposium on Science & Mormonism: Cosmos, Earth & Man. November 9, 2013.
ID = [6835]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2013-11-09  Collections:  interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:51
Baird, Brian J. “Understanding Jacob’s Teachings about Plural Marriage from a Law of Moses Context.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 25 (2017): 227-237.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: This paper reviews the Book of Mormon prophet Jacob’s proscription against plural marriage, arguing that the verses in Jacob 24–30 should be interpreted in a Law of Moses context regarding levirate marriage, by which a man was responsible for marrying his dead brother’s wife if that brother died before having an heir. I also review how these verses have been used in arguments for and against plural marriage, and how levirate marriage practices worked in Mosaic tradition.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
ID = [3694]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 25926  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Baker, Jenny Oaks. “Christmastime: When Our Souls Can Sing.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 27 (2017): 257-260.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Christmas is upon us, and it is a special, magical time. I have seen the love of God touch countless lives through the glorious music of the season.
.

ID = [3675]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 4081  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Wilcox, Bradley R., Wendy Baker-Smemoe, Bruce L. Brown, and Sharon Black. “Comparing Book of Mormon Names with Those Found in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Works: An Exploratory Study.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 30 (2018): 105-124.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The works of Tolkien and the Book of Mormon have been compared in a variety of ways by multiple authors and researchers, but none have looked specifically at the unusual names found within both. Wordprint studies are one tool used in author attribution research, but do authors use specific sounds more than others — consciously or subconsciously — when selecting or inventing names? Some research suggests they may and that their patterns could create a “sound print” or phonoprint. This constitutes a fresh and unusual path of research that deserves more attention. The purpose of this exploratory study was to see if phonoprints surfaced when examining Dwarf, Elf, Hobbit, Man, and other names created by Tolkien and Jaredite, Nephite, Mulekite, and Lamanite names found in the Book of Mormon. Results suggest that Tolkien had a phonoprint he was unable to entirely escape when creating character names, even when he claimed he based them on distinct languages. In contrast, in Book of Mormon names, a single author’s phonoprint did not emerge. Names varied by group in the way one would expect authentic names from different cultures to vary. Although much more research needs to be done to establish the validity and reliability of using phonoprints for author identification, this study opens a door for future research.

ID = [3610]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 43860  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Wilcox, Bradley R., Bruce L. Brown, Wendy Baker-Smemoe, Sharon Black, and Dennis L. Eggett. “Comparing Phonemic Patterns in Book of Mormon Personal Names with Fictional and Authentic Sources: An Exploratory Study.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 33 (2019): 105-122.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In 2013 we published a study examining names from Solomon Spalding’s fictional manuscript, J. R. R. Tolkien’s fictional works, and nineteenth-century US census records. Results showed names created by authors of fiction followed phonemic patterns that differed from those of authentic names from a variety of cultural origins found in the US census. The current study used the same methodology to compare Book of Mormon names to the three name sources in the original study and found that Book of Mormon names seem to have more in common with the patterns found in authentic names than they do with those from fictional works. This is not to say that Book of Mormon names are similar to nineteenth- century names, but rather that they both showed similar patterns when phonotactic probabilities were the common measure. Of course, many more invented names and words from a variety of authors and time periods will need to be analyzed along with many more authentic names across multiple time periods before any reliable conclusions can be drawn. This study was exploratory in nature and conducted to determine if this new line of research merits further study. We concluded it does.

ID = [3560]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 37458  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Barney, Kevin L. “Baptized for the Dead.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 39 (2020): 103-150.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: This thorough treatment of the mention of baptism for the dead in 1 Corinthians 15:29 gives a meticulous analysis of Paul’s Greek argument, and lays out the dozens (or perhaps hundreds) of theories that have been put forth with respect to its interpretation. Barney concludes that “the most natural reading” and the “majority contemporary scholarly reading” is that of “vicarious baptism.” Therefore, “the Prophet Joseph Smith’s reading of the passage to refer to such a practice was indeed correct.”
[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.See Kevin L. Barney, “Baptized for the Dead,” in “To Seek the Law of the Lord”: Essays in Honor of John W. Welch, ed. Paul Y. Hoskisson and Daniel C. Peterson (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, 2017), 9–58. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/to-seek-the-law-of-the-lord-essays-in-honor-of-john-w-welch-2/.]
.

ID = [3483]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 64655  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Barney, Kevin L. “What’s in a Name? Playing in the Onomastic Sandbox.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 29 (2018): 251-272.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Name as Key-Word brings together a collection of essays, many of them previously published, whose consistent theme is exploring examples of onomastic wordplay or puns in Mormon scripture in general and the Book of Mormon in particular. Without a knowledge of the meaning of these names, the punning in the scriptural accounts would not be recognized by modern English readers. Exploring the (probable) meanings of these names helps to open our eyes to how the scriptural authors used punning and other forms of wordplay to convey their messages in a memorable way.
Review of Matthew L. Bowen, Name as Key-Word: Collected Essays on Onomastic Wordplay and the Temple in Mormon Scripture (Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2018). 408 pp., $24.95.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
ID = [3636]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 51149  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Barney, Quinten Zehn. “A New and Most Welcome Resource for Book of Abraham Studies.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 56 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 56 (2023): 259-264.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Review of Stephen O. Smoot, John Gee, Kerry Muhlestein, and John S. Thompson, “A Guide to the Book of Abraham,” BYU Studies Quarterly 61, no. 4 (2022). 302 pages. Abstract: The new and special issue of BYU Studies containing “A Guide to the Book of Abraham” provides a welcome and easy-to-read approach to the historicity and issues surrounding the Book of Abraham in a way that will engage those beginning their studies in the Book of Abraham just as equally as those who have already become familiar with the subject.

Keywords: Book of Abraham; review
ID = [81224]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  abraham,interpreter-journal  Size: 10373  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:12
Barney, Quinten Zehn. “Samuel the Lamanite, Christ, and Zenos: A Study of Intertextuality.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 18 (2016): 159-170.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: During Christ’s mortal ministry at Jerusalem, his teachings often drew upon the writings of Isaiah, Moses, and other prophets with whom his audience was familiar. On the other hand, Christ never seems to quote Nephi, Mosiah, or other Book of Mormon prophets to the Jews and their surrounding neighbors, despite being the ultimate source for their inspired writings. It is because of this apparent confinement to Old Testament sources that intertextual parallels between the words of Christ in Matthew 23–24 and the words of Samuel the Lamanite in Helaman 13–15 jump out as intriguing. This paper explores the intertextual relationship between these chapters in Helaman and Matthew and suggests that the parallels between these texts can be attributed to a common source available to both Samuel and Christ, the writings of the prophet Zenos.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Enos
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
ID = [4405]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 22805  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:01
Belnap, Daniel L. “The Role of Visual Aesthetics in Ancient Israel’s Temple Worship.” Paper presented at the 2014 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. October 25, 2014.
ID = [6861]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2014-10-25  Collections:  interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:51
Belnap, David M. “The Inclusive, Anti-Discrimination Message of the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 42 (2021): 195-370.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Attitudes of superiority lead to societal conflict. The racial interpretation of a few Book of Mormon verses has contributed to these attitudes and conflicts, yet hundreds of inclusive messages are found in more than half of the book’s verses. God’s message, love, mercy, and justice are for all people. Righteous people did not think themselves above others, nor did they persecute others or start wars. War is tragic and is caused by wickedness. Conspiracies are a great evil. Righteous people were kind in their attitudes and actions, regardless of others’ social status or ethnicity. Some Book of Mormon people even gave their lives or put their lives at risk to act kindly, and some of these went from hating others to giving up their lives on behalf of others. The inclusive messages in the Book of Mormon are consistent with the position advocated by current Latter-day Saint leaders condemning all racism and disavowing racist hypotheses such as those derived from a few Book of Mormon verses (i.e., that skin color is related to righteousness). The inclusive messages also are consistent with the view that skin color in the Book of Mormon is not literal but is metaphorical. The Book of Mormon instructs us that the right way to interact is with love and respect, through examples of people respecting and reaching out to others, promises to all people, condemnation of unkindness and anti-Semitism, calls to all people to repent, and emphasizing the flaws of one’s own group and not those of others.

ID = [3441]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 64213  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Belnap, David M. “The Theory of Evolution is Compatible with Both Belief and Unbelief in a Supreme Being.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 16 (2015): 261-281.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The crux of the creation–evolution conflict is a futile desire to scientifically prove or disprove the existence of God. The conflict is manifest in the common belief that creation means a divine, supernatural process and that evolution denotes an atheistic, accidental event. Evolution involves a random change in an inherited trait followed by selection for or against the altered trait. If humans use this principle to design machines, solve complex mathematical problems, engineer proteins, and manipulate living organisms, then certainly a super-intelligent being could have used evolution to create life on earth. This reasoning indicates that evolution does not prove atheism and that evolution is a constructive process. The theory of evolution is a mechanistic description and therefore, like all other scientific principles, is neutral on the question of God’s existence. Evolution is compatible with the simple scriptural accounts of creation. Consequently, belief or unbelief in God is put back where it should be — on individual choice.

Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Basic Resources > Perspectives on Science and the Book of Moses
ID = [4235]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal,moses  Size: 55312  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bennett, Jim. “‘Somebody Wrote It:’ The Book of Mormon’s Missionary Message to a 21st-Century World.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 34 (2020): 265-278.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Nathan Oman’s “Welding Another Link in Wonder’s Chain: The Task of Latter-day Saint Intellectuals in the Church’s Third Century” wisely called for “new language in which to celebrate the Restoration.” That new language can be found in understanding the power of the Book of Mormon, which is the tangible miracle at the heart of the Restoration that defies the critics. My father, Senator Robert F. Bennett, devoted his final years to arguing that the Book of Mormon’s existence is a stumbling block to those who try to dismiss it as an obvious fraud. Those who scoff at the Book of Mormon have yet to come up with a plausible secular account of its existence, and this allows the Book of Mormon to endure as the centerpiece of our missionary efforts. But rather than simply use the Book of Mormon to attempt to answer questions people are no longer asking, we need to create a missionary message that uses this sacred scripture to connect people, directly and personally, to Jesus Christ.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Topics > Criticisms and Apologetics > Book Reviews
ID = [3555]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 32294  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Bennett, Richard E. “A Uni-Dimensional Picture of a Multi-Faceted Nauvoo Community.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 40 (2020): 1-14.
Display Abstract  

Review of Benjamin E. Park, Kingdom of Nauvoo: The Rise and Fall of a Religious Empire on the American Frontier (New York City: Liveright Publishing, 2020). 336 pages. $28.95 (hardback).Abstract: Benjamin Park recently wrote a substantive revisionist history of Nauvoo, Illinois, the one-time Church capital under the leadership of Joseph Smith, Jr. This article serves as a critical review of Park’s work. Congratulating the author for placing this well-known Latter-day Saint story within the larger Jacksonian American democratic context, as well as for utilizing a great many primary sources hardly used before, Richard Bennett in this critical review assesses both the strengths and the weaknesses of this important new book. While complimenting Park for his significant contributions on politics, women, and race in Nauvoo, Bennett nonetheless finds much to criticize in what he sees as a unidimensional, highly political study that disregards many previous studies of Nauvoo and fails to address many other critically important facets of the city’s life and history from its inception in 1839 until the Saints’ departure in 1846.

ID = [3466]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 35429  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Benson, RoseAnn. “Campbellites and Mormonites: Competing Restoration Movements.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 31 (2019): 233-244.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In October 1830, Oliver Cowdery, Peter Whitmer Jr., Parley P. Pratt, and Ziba Peterson were the first missionaries sent to travel through the western states to the Indian territory at the far reaches of the United States. Pratt, a former resident of northeastern Ohio, suggested they stop in the Kirtland, Ohio, area and visit his preacher friend, Sidney Rigdon. It was Rigdon who had earlier convinced Pratt that the restoration of the ancient order that included faith in Jesus Christ, repentance, baptism for the remission of sins, and the promise of the gift of the Holy Spirit could be found in Alexander Campbell’s restoration movement. Within a few weeks, the four missionaries baptized Rigdon and more than 100 new converts into Joseph Smith’s restoration movement — many of whom had been members of Campbell’s restoration movement. Although both Alexander Campbell and Joseph Smith called their movements restorations, the foundation upon which each was built was very different.

ID = [3596]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 28155  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Benson, RoseAnn. “The Title of Liberty and Ancient Prophecy.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 23 (2017): 299-307.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Captain Moroni cites a prophecy regarding Joseph of Egypt and his posterity that is not recorded in the Bible. He accompanies the prophecy with a symbolic action to motivate his warriors to covenant to be faithful to their prophet Helaman and to keep the commandments lest God would not preserve them as he had Joseph.

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [3718]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 23044  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bentley, Joseph I., and John W. Welch. “Road to Martyrdom: Legal Aspects of Joseph Smith’s Last Days.” “A Life Lived in Crescendo” Firesides. The Interpreter Foundation YouTube channel. November 21, 2021.
Display Abstract  

This fireside will examine several lesser-known aspects of Joseph Smith’s road to martyrdom. In addition to mentioning outside opponents and background legal factors, we will focus on the motives of those Nauvoo insiders who were most instrumental in causing the prophet’s death. How early did their efforts begin? What were their three principal plans to kill him? Was Joseph’s order as Mayor to suppress the Nauvoo Expositor the main cause of his death on June 27, or was there another legal pretext?
As pressures mounted, why did Joseph and Hyrum cross the Mississippi River early Sunday morning, June 23? What did they do in Iowa? Why did they return to Nauvoo and go on Monday to Carthage? Why then did all the members of the Nauvoo City Council leave Joseph and Hyrum alone, trapped in Carthage? Where were the Twelve Apostles and Joseph’s friends? Where was Governor Ford, and the Carthage Greys? Who was in the mob that stormed the Carthage Jail, and where did they go? How was this all pulled off? Was it a perfect storm?
In its legal aftermath, what was the final outcome of the many Expositor riot cases? Did the Mormon insiders get compensated for the loss of their press? What were the legal charges that put Joseph and Hyrum Smith in Carthage Jail until they were killed, and how did those legal matters finally play out? Did any members of the mob face an earthly justice? How did the martyrdom influence subsequent developments and the desired goal of driving all Mormons from Illinois?

ID = [6972]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2021-11-21  Collections:  interpreter-website,welch  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:52
Berman, Joshua. “The Temple: A Multi-Faceted Center and Its Problems.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 17 (2016): 63-84.
Display Abstract  

Editor’s Note: At the request of BYU Law Professor John W. Welch, Dr. Berman graciously provided this article for publication as an introduction to a series of lectures he will be giving in Utah on October 7 and 8, 2015. The first lecture will focus on the differences between the Tabernacle and the Temple, the second lecture will discuss recent findings linking inscriptions from Ramesses II to the sea account in Exodus, and the third lecture will touch on issues in biblical law. These lectures are co-sponsored by the Academy for Temple Studies, BYU Studies, the Ancient Near Eastern Studies Department in the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies, the J. Reuben Clark Law School, and The Interpreter Foundation, and details can be found online. This article is adapted from The Temple: Its Symbolism and Meaning Then and Now (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, first ed., 1995).
Abstract: One of the primary identities of the Temple is that it is the place of hashra’at ha-shekhinah, the site at which God’s presence is most manifest. It is no surprise then, that the Temple is the focal point of prayer. Yet, as the site at which God’s presence is most intimately manifest, the Temple is also the center of the nation in several major spheres of collective life. This centrality is exhibited in the structure of the Book of Deuteronomy. Chapters 12-26 depict commandments that are to be the social and religious frame of life in the land of Israel. Within this section the central shrine, “the place in which God shall establish His name,” is mentioned nearly twenty times. The Temple is cast as the center for sacrifices (ch. 12), the consumption of tithes (14:23-25), the celebration of the festivals (ch. 16), and the center of the judicial system (ch. 17). In this chapter we will explore how the Temple constitutes the national center for social unity, education, and justice. The concentration of activity and jurisdiction at the Temple, however, renders it prone to abuse, and in the second half of this chapter, we will probe the social and religious ills that emerged as an endemic part of the Temple’s existence.
.

ID = [4211]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 50795  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Birch, A. Jane. “Getting into the Meat of the Word of Wisdom.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 11 (2014): 1-36.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In verse 13 of the Word of Wisdom, the Lord tells us, “it is pleasing unto me that they [flesh of beasts and fowls of the air] should not be used, only in times of winter, or of cold, or famine” (D&C 89:13). Judging from the variety of interpretations this single verse has inspired, it would appear to be deeply enigmatic. Interestingly, most interpretations have been put forward with little supporting evidence. This article is the first comprehensive analysis of the diverse explanations for D&C 89:13 that have been suggested since 1833. In this article, I attempt to analyze these various interpretations in light of the available evidence.

ID = [4285]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2014-01-01  Collections:  d-c,interpreter-journal  Size: 64915  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Birch, A. Jane. “Questioning the Comma in Verse 13 of the Word of Wisdom.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 10 (2014): 133-149.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The 1921 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants included an additional comma, which was inserted after the word “used” in D&C 89:13: “And it is pleasing unto me that they should not be used, only in times of winter, or of cold, or famine.” Later authors have speculated that the addition of the comma was a mistake that fundamentally changed the meaning of the verse. This article examines this “errant comma theory” and demonstrates why this particular interpretation of D&C 89:13 is without merit.

ID = [4297]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2014-01-01  Collections:  d-c,interpreter-journal  Size: 27285  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Bitton, Davis. “I Don’t Have a Testimony of the History of the Church.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 31 (2019): 285-302.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In this masterful presentation, accomplished historian Davis Bitton addresses the role of history and belief. Testimonies, he asserts, are born of belief and spiritual witnesses, not from historical events. It is quite possible to know all about Church history and still remain a believing member.
[Editor’s Note: This essay was presented at the 2004 FAIR Conference.
In preparation for publication it has been lightly copy edited and some citations and annotations added.].

ID = [3600]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 42597  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Wilcox, Bradley R., Wendy Baker-Smemoe, Bruce L. Brown, and Sharon Black. “Comparing Book of Mormon Names with Those Found in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Works: An Exploratory Study.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 30 (2018): 105-124.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The works of Tolkien and the Book of Mormon have been compared in a variety of ways by multiple authors and researchers, but none have looked specifically at the unusual names found within both. Wordprint studies are one tool used in author attribution research, but do authors use specific sounds more than others — consciously or subconsciously — when selecting or inventing names? Some research suggests they may and that their patterns could create a “sound print” or phonoprint. This constitutes a fresh and unusual path of research that deserves more attention. The purpose of this exploratory study was to see if phonoprints surfaced when examining Dwarf, Elf, Hobbit, Man, and other names created by Tolkien and Jaredite, Nephite, Mulekite, and Lamanite names found in the Book of Mormon. Results suggest that Tolkien had a phonoprint he was unable to entirely escape when creating character names, even when he claimed he based them on distinct languages. In contrast, in Book of Mormon names, a single author’s phonoprint did not emerge. Names varied by group in the way one would expect authentic names from different cultures to vary. Although much more research needs to be done to establish the validity and reliability of using phonoprints for author identification, this study opens a door for future research.

ID = [3610]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 43860  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Wilcox, Bradley R., Bruce L. Brown, Wendy Baker-Smemoe, Sharon Black, and Dennis L. Eggett. “Comparing Phonemic Patterns in Book of Mormon Personal Names with Fictional and Authentic Sources: An Exploratory Study.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 33 (2019): 105-122.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In 2013 we published a study examining names from Solomon Spalding’s fictional manuscript, J. R. R. Tolkien’s fictional works, and nineteenth-century US census records. Results showed names created by authors of fiction followed phonemic patterns that differed from those of authentic names from a variety of cultural origins found in the US census. The current study used the same methodology to compare Book of Mormon names to the three name sources in the original study and found that Book of Mormon names seem to have more in common with the patterns found in authentic names than they do with those from fictional works. This is not to say that Book of Mormon names are similar to nineteenth- century names, but rather that they both showed similar patterns when phonotactic probabilities were the common measure. Of course, many more invented names and words from a variety of authors and time periods will need to be analyzed along with many more authentic names across multiple time periods before any reliable conclusions can be drawn. This study was exploratory in nature and conducted to determine if this new line of research merits further study. We concluded it does.

ID = [3560]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 37458  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Black, Susan Easton. “Sensationalism: A One-sided Perspective.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 38 (2020): 107-110.
Display Abstract  

Review of Benjamin E. Park, Kingdom of Nauvoo: The Rise and Fall of a Religious Empire on the American Frontier (New York City: Liveright Publishing, 2020). 336 pages. $28.95 (hardback).
Abstract: While Benjamin Park shows promise as a writer and historian, his book, Kingdom of Nauvoo, opts for poorly sourced sensationalism instead of illuminating the joy of Nauvoo’s true history.

ID = [3497]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 6914  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Blythe, Christopher J. “Vaughn J. Featherstone’s Atlanta Temple Letter.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 37 (2020): 309-318.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In this essay, I examine a letter written by Elder Vaughn J. Featherstone in 1983 and deposited in the cornerstone of the Atlanta Georgia Temple. The letter is addressed to twenty-first century members of the Church and is written with the expectation that these future Saints will have been alive for the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. I consider the claims made about this letter from a recent viral video entitled “7 Year Tribulation in the SEVENTH Seal TIMELINE.”.

ID = [3516]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 20470  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Bokovoy, David E. “Ancient Temple Imagery in the Sermons of Jacob.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 46 (2021): 31-46.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: This essay makes a compelling argument for Jacob, the brother of Nephi, having deep knowledge of ancient Israelite temple ritual, concepts, and imagery, based on two of Jacob’s sermons in 2 Nephi 9 and Jacob 1-3. For instance, he discusses the duty of the priest to expiate sin and make atonement before the Lord and of entering God’s presence. Jacob quotes temple-related verses from the Old Testament, like Psalm 95. The allusions to the temple are not forced, but very subtle. Of course, Jacob’s central topic, the atonement, is a temple topic itself, and its opposite, impurity, is also expressed by Jacob in terms familiar and central to an ancient temple priest. The temple is also shown as a gate to heaven.
[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.
See David E. Bokovoy, “Ancient Temple Imagery in the Sermons of Jacob,” in Temple Insights: Proceedings of the Interpreter Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference, “The Temple on Mount Zion,” 22 September 2012, ed. William J. Hamblin and David Rolph Seely (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2014), 171–186. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/temple-insights/.].

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
ID = [3382]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 34534  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Bokovoy, David E. “Holiness to the Lord: Biblical Temple Imagery in the Sermons of Jacob the Priest.” Paper presented at the 2012 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. September 22, 2012.
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
ID = [6854]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2012-09-22  Collections:  bom,interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:51
Bokovoy, David E. “‘Thou Knowest That I Believe’: Invoking The Spirit of the Lord as Council Witness in 1 Nephi 11.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 1 (2012): 1-23.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The Book of Mormon features an esoteric exchange between the prophet Nephi and the Spirit of the Lord on an exceedingly high mountain. The following essay explores some of the ways in which an Israelite familiar with ancient religious experiences and scribal techniques might have interpreted this event. The analysis shows that Nephi’s conversation, as well as other similar accounts in the Book of Mormon, echoes an ancient temple motif. As part of this paradigm, the essay explores the manner in which the text depicts the Spirit of the Lord in a role associated with members of the divine council in both biblical and general Near Eastern conceptions. .

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Old Testament Scriptures > Deuteronomy
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
ID = [4389]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2012-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 42962  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:01
Bowen, Matthew L. “Alma — Young Man, Hidden Prophet.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 19 (2016): 343-353.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The biographical introduction of Alma the Elder into the Book of Mormon narrative (Mosiah 17:2) also introduces the name Alma into the text for the first time, this in close juxtaposition with a description of Alma as a “young man.” The best explanation for the name Alma is that it derives from the Semitic term ǵlm (Hebrew ʿelem), “young man,” “youth,” “lad.” This suggests the strong probability of an intentional wordplay on the name Alma in the Book of Mormon’s underlying text: Alma became “[God’s] young man” or “servant.” Additional lexical connections between Mosiah 17:2 and Mosiah 14:1 (quoting Isaiah 53:1) suggest that Abinadi identified Alma as the one “to whom” or “upon whom” (ʿal-mî) the Lord was “reveal[ing]” his arm as Abinadi’s prophetic successor. Alma began his prophetic succession when he “believed” Abinadi’s report and pled with King Noah for Abinadi’s life. Forced to flee, Alma began his prophetic ministry “hidden” and “concealed” while writing the words of Abinadi and teaching them “privately.” The narrative’s dramatic emphasis on this aspect of Alma’s life suggests an additional thread of wordplay that exploits the homonymy between Alma and the Hebrew root *ʿlm, forms of which mean “to hide,” “conceal,” “be hidden,” “be concealed.” The richness of the wordplay and allusion revolving around Alma’s name in Mosiah 17–18 accentuates his importance as a prophetic figure and founder of the later Nephite church. Moreover, it suggests that Alma’s name was appropriate given the details of his life and that he lived up to the positive connotations latent in his name.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
ID = [3768]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 25283  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘And the Meek Also Shall Increase’: The Verb yāsap in Isaiah 29 and Nephi’s Prophetic Allusions to the Name Joseph in 2 Nephi 25–30.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 30 (2018): 5-42.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Beyond his autobiographic use of Joseph’s name and biography, Nephi also considered the name Joseph to have long-term prophetic value. As a Semitic/Hebrew name, Joseph derives from the verb yāsap (to “add,” “increase,” “proceed to do something,” “do something again,” and to “do something more”), thus meaning “may he [God] add,” “may he increase,” or “may he do more/again.” Several of the prophecies of Isaiah, in which Nephi’s soul delighted and for which he offers extensive interpretation, prominently employ forms of yāsap in describing iterative and restorative divine action (e.g., Isaiah 11:11; 26:15; 29:14; cf. 52:1). The prophecy of the coming forth of the sealed book in Isaiah 29 employs the latter verb three times (Isaiah 29:1, 14, and 19). Nephi’s extensive midrash of Isaiah 29 in 2 Nephi 25–30 (especially 2 Nephi 27) interpretively expands Isaiah’s use of the yāsap idiom(s). Time and again, Nephi returns to the language of Isaiah 29:14 (“I will proceed [yôsīp] to do a marvelous work”), along with a similar yāsap-idiom from Isaiah 11:11 (“the Lord shall set his hand again [yôsîp] … to recover the remnant of his people”) to foretell the Latter-day forthcoming of the sealed book to fulfill the Lord’s ancient promises to the patriarch. Given Nephi’s earlier preservation of Joseph’s prophecies regarding a future seer named “Joseph,” we can reasonably see Nephi’s emphasis on iterative divine action in his appropriation of the Isaianic use of yāsap as a direct and thematic allusion to this latter-day “Joseph” and his role in bringing forth additional scripture. This additional scripture would enable the meek to “increase,” just as Isaiah and Nephi had prophesied. “May [God] Add”/“May He Increase”.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Old Testament Scriptures > Isaiah
ID = [3603]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 63321  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘And There Wrestled a Man with Him’ (Genesis 32:24): Enos’s Adaptations of the Onomastic Wordplay of Genesis.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 10 (2014): 151-160.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In this brief note, I will suggest several instances in which the Book of Mormon prophet Enos utilizes wordplay on his own name, the name of his father “Jacob,” the place name “Peniel,” and Jacob’s new name “Israel” in order to connect his experiences to those of his ancestor Jacob in Genesis 32-33, thus infusing them with greater meaning. Familiarity with Jacob and Esau’s conciliatory “embrace” in Genesis 33 is essential to understanding how Enos views the atonement of Christ and the ultimate realization of its blessings in his life.

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Enos
ID = [4298]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2014-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 17781  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘And They Shall Be Had Again’: Onomastic Allusions to Joseph in Moses 1:41 in View of the So-called Canon Formula.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 32 (2019): 297-304.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Moses 1:41 echoes or plays on the etymological meaning of the name Joseph — “may he [Yahweh] add,” as the Lord foretells to Moses the raising up of a future figure through whom the Lord’s words, after having been “taken” (away) from the book that Moses would write, “shall be had again among the children of men.” Moses 1:41 anticipates and employs language reminiscent of the so-called biblical canon formulas, possible additions to biblical texts meant to ensure the texts’ stability by warning against “adding” or “diminishing” (i.e., “taking away”) from them (e.g., Deuteronomy 4:2; 5:22 [MT 5:18]; 12:32 [MT 13:1]; cf. Revelation 22:18– 19). This article presupposes that the vision of Moses presents restored text that was at some point recorded in Hebrew.

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Old Testament Scriptures > Deuteronomy
Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 1 — Visions of Moses
ID = [3584]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,moses,old-test  Size: 17297  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Bowen, Matthew L. “Becoming Men and Women of Understanding: Wordplay on Benjamin — An Addendum.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 36 (2020): 239-280.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Royal and divine sonship/daughterhood (bānîm = “children”/“sons,” bānôt = “daughters”) is a prevalent theme throughout the Book of Mosiah. “Understanding” (Hebrew noun, bînâ or tĕbûnâ; verb, bîn) is also a key theme in that book. The initial juxtaposition of “sons” and “understanding” with the name “Benjamin” (binyāmîn, “son of the right hand”) in Mosiah 1:2–7 suggests the narrator’s association of the underlying terms with the name Benjamin likely on the basis of homophony. King Benjamin repeatedly invokes “understand” in his speech (forms of “understand” were derived from the root *byn in Hebrew; Mosiah 2:9, 40; 4:4; cf. 3:15) — a speech that culminates in a rhetorical wordplay on his own name in terms of “sons”/“children,” “daughters,” and “right hand” (Mosiah 5:7, 9). “Understand,” moreover, recurs as a paronomasia on the name Benjamin at key points later in the Book of Mosiah (Mosiah 8:3, 20; 26:1–3), which bring together the themes of sonship and/or “understanding” (or lack of thereof) with King Benjamin’s name. Later statements in the Book of Mosiah about “becoming” the “children of God” or “becoming his sons and daughters” (Mosiah 18:22; 27:25) through divine rebirth allude to King Benjamin’s sermon and the wordplay on “Benjamin” there. Taken as a literary whole, the book of Mosiah constitutes a treatise on “becoming” — i.e., divine transformation through Christ’s atonement (cf. Mosiah 3:18–19). Mormon’s statement in Alma 17:2 about the sons of Mosiah having become “men of a sound understanding” thus serves as a fitting epilogue to a narrative arc begun as early as Mosiah 1:2.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
Book of Mormon Topics > Literary and Textual Studies > Wordplay
Book of Mormon Topics > Doctrines and Teachings > Becoming
Book of Mormon Topics > General Topics > King Benjamin’s Speech
ID = [3529]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 63151  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘Behold, He Was a Man Like unto Ammon’: Mormon’s Use of ʾmn-related Terminology in Praise of Moroni in Alma 48.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 58 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 58 (2023): 223-242.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: This article examines Mormon’s comparison of Moroni, the Nephite military leader, to Ammon, the son of Mosiah, in Alma 48:18 and how Mormon’s use and repetition of ʾmn-related terminology (“faithful,” “firm,” “faith,” “verily [surely]”) in Alma 48:7–17 lays a foundation for this comparison. Ammon’s name, phonologically and perhaps etymologically, suggests the meaning “faithful.” Mormon goes to extraordinary lengths in the Lamanite conversion narratives to show that Ammon is not only worthy of this name, but that his faithfulness is the catalyst for the transition of many Lamanites from unbelief to covenant faithfulness. Thus, in comparing Moroni directly to Ammon, Mormon makes a most emphatic statement regarding Moroni’s covenant faithfulness. Moreover, this comparison reveals his admiration for both men.

Keywords: Ammon; Book of Mormon; Captain Moroni; etymology; faithful; phonology
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
ID = [81204]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 46202  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:11
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #14: The Teachings of Enoch — Enoch as a Teacher (Moses 6:51–68).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 01, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4575]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 40859  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #15: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘The Son of Man, Even Jesus Christ, a Righteous Judge’ (Moses 6:57).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 08, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4574]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 47872  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #16: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By Water, and Blood, and the Spirit’ (Moses 6:58–60).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 15, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4573]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 28271  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #17: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By the Water Ye Keep the Commandment’ (Moses 6:60, 64).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 22, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4572]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 23290  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #18: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘Out of the Waters of Judah’ (1 Nephi 20:1; JST Genesis 17:3–7).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 29, 2020.
Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4571]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bom,bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses,old-test  Size: 30134  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #19: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By the Spirit Ye Are Justified’ (Moses 6:60, 63, 65–66).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 05, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4570]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 29035  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #20: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By the Blood Ye Are Sanctified’ (Moses 6:60).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 12, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4569]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 40440  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #21: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘Thus May All Become My Sons’ (Moses 6:59, 66–68).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 19, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4568]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 31504  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Matthew L. Bowen, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #39: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: The Names of Moses as ‘Keywords’ (Moses 1:25).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. January 23, 2021.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 1 — Visions of Moses
Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4550]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 64240  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Matthew L. Bowen, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #40: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: Moses’ Vision at the Veil (Moses 1:27–30).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. January 30, 2021.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 1 — Visions of Moses
ID = [4549]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 22851  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Matthew L. Bowen, David J. Larsen, and Stephen T. Whitlock. “Essay #41: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: Moses in the Presence of God (Moses 1:31, chapters 2-4).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. February 06, 2021.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 1 — Visions of Moses
ID = [4548]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 24141  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Matthew L. Bowen, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #42: Moses 1 in Its Ancient Context: ‘The Words of God’ (Moses 1:1–7, 35, 40–42).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. February 13, 2021.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 1 — Visions of Moses
ID = [4547]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 15105  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Matthew L. Bowen, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #43: Moses 1: A Literary Masterpiece. Many-Great Waters and Moses’ Mission to Baptize (Moses 1:25-26).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. February 20, 2021.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 1 — Visions of Moses
ID = [4546]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 25323  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Matthew L. Bowen, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #48: Moses Witnesses the Creation (Moses 2): ‘This I Did By the Word of My Power’ (Moses 2:5).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. March 28, 2021.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 2 — Creation
ID = [4541]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 31087  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘But That Thou Wouldst Clear My Way Before Me’: A Note on the Personal and Emotional Rendering of an Ancient Idiom in 2 Nephi 4:33.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 53 (2022): 31-36.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: The biblical Hebrew collocation pinnâ derek or pannû derek (cf. Egyptian Ἰr wꜣ.t [n]), often rendered “prepare the way” or “prepare a way” in English, is an evident stylistic feature of Nephi’s writings. The most basic meaning of this idiom is “clear my way,” which is how it is rendered in 2 Nephi 4:33. Zenos’s use of “prepare the way” (Jacob 5:61, 64) in the context of “clear[ing] away” bad branches also reflects this most basic meaning.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; clear the way; prepare the way; psalm of Nephi; Zenos
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Enos
ID = [12588]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 9270  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., and Matthew L. Bowen. “‘By the Blood Ye Are Sanctified’: The Symbolic, Salvific, Interrelated, Additive, Retrospective, and Anticipatory Nature of the Ordinances of Spiritual Rebirth in John 3 and Moses 6.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 24 (2017): 123-316.
Display Abstract  

[Editor’s Note: This article is an updated and extended version of a presentation given at the Third Interpreter Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference: The Temple on Mount Zion, November 5, 2016, at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. For a video version of the presentation, see https://interpreterfoundation.org/conferences/2016-temple-on-mount-zion-conference/2016-temple-on-mount-zion-conference-videos/]
Abstract: In chapter 3 of the Gospel of John, Jesus described spiritual rebirth as consisting of two parts: being “born of water and of the spirit.”
To this requirement of being “born again into the kingdom of heaven, of water, and of the Spirit,” Moses 6:59–60 adds that one must “be cleansed by blood, even the blood of mine Only Begotten; … For … by the blood ye are sanctified.”
In this article, we will discuss the symbolism of water, spirit, and blood in scripture as they are actualized in the process of spiritual rebirth. We will highlight in particular the symbolic, salvific, interrelated, additive, retrospective, and anticipatory nature of these ordinances within the allusive and sometimes enigmatic descriptions of John 3 and Moses 6. Moses 6:51–68, with its dense infusion of temple themes, was revealed to the Prophet in December 1830, when the Church was in its infancy and more than a decade before the fulness of priesthood ordinances was made available to the Saints in Nauvoo. Our study of these chapters informs our closing perspective on the meaning of the sacrament, which is consistent with the recent re-emphasis of Church leaders that the “sacrament is a beautiful time to not just renew our baptismal covenants, but to commit to Him to renew all our covenants.”
We discuss the relationship of the sacrament to the shewbread of Israelite temples, and its anticipation of the heavenly feast that will be enjoyed by those who have been sanctified by the blood of Jesus Christ.

Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
Book of Moses Topics > Temple Themes in the Book of Moses and Related Scripture
ID = [3705]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-journal,moses  Size: 63988  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘By The Word of My Power’: The Divine Word in the Book of Moses.” In Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, Volume 2. Edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon, 733–88. Orem, UT; Springville, UT; Redding, CA; Tooele, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, and Eborn Books, 2021.
ID = [4651]  Status = Type = book chapter  Date = 2021-08-04  Collections:  interpreter-website,moses  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:03
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘Can You Suppose That the Lord Will Spare You?’: Moroni’s Charged Rhetoric in Alma 60:30–32.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 51 (2022): 199-210.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: Under the duress of a lengthy war, and prompted by recent Lamanite military successes, as well as incensed at the government’s failure to resupply Helaman’s armies with provisions and to send men to reinforce the city Nephihah, Moroni sent a second scathing letter to the leaders of the Nephite nation in the Nephite capital city Zarahemla. As other scholars have noted, the name Zarahemla likely denotes “seed of compassion” or “seed of sparing.” In this article, I propose that Moroni’s rhetoric in the letter includes an acerbic word-irony involving the meaning of Zarahemla perhaps achieved in terms of the Hebrew verb yaḥmōl (“[he] will spare,” from ḥml, “spare,” “have compassion.” This word-irony points out that although the Lord had spared the people of Zarahemla and the Nephites in the past, the uncompassionate behavior of the nation’s leaders in Zarahemla was creating conditions under which the Lord would not spare the leadership in Zarahemla. Moroni wrote, “Behold, I come unto you, even in the land of Zarahemla, and smite you with the sword … For behold, the Lord will not suffer that ye shall live and wax strong in your iniquities to destroy his righteous people. Behold, can you suppose that the Lord will spare you…?” (Alma 60:30–32). The covenant background of this threat will also be explored.

Keywords: Alma 60; Book of Mormon; Captain Moroni; Zarahemla
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [12573]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 28442  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Bowen, Matthew L. “Coming Down and Bringing Down: Pejorative Onomastic Allusions to the Jaredites in Helaman 6:25, 6:38, and Ether 2:11.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 42 (2021): 397-410.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Mormon uses pejorative wordplay on the name Jaredites based on the meaning of the Hebrew verb yārad. The onomastic rhetoric involving the meaning of yārad first surfaces in Helaman 6 where Mormon also employs wordplay on the name Cain in terms of qānâ or “getting gain.” The first wordplay occurs in the negative purpose clause “lest they should be a means of bringing down [cf. lĕhôrîd] the people unto destruction” (Helaman 6:25) and the second in the prepositional phrase “until they had come down [cf. yārĕdû/yordû] to believe in their works” (Helaman 6:38). Mormon uses these pejorative wordplays as a means of emphasizing the genetic link that he sees between Jareditic secret combinations and the derivative Gadianton robbers. Moroni reflects upon his father’s earlier use of this type of pejorative wordplay on “Jaredites” and yārad when he directly informs latter-day Gentiles regarding the “decrees of God” upon the land of promise “that ye may repent and not continue in your iniquities until the fullness be come, that ye may not bring down [cf. *tôrîdû/hôradtem] the fullness of the wrath of God upon you as the inhabitants of the land hath hitherto done” (Ether 2:11). All three of these onomastic allusions constitute an urgent and timely warning to latter-day Gentiles living upon the land of promise. They warn the Gentiles against “coming down” to believe in and partake of the works and spoils of secret combinations like the Jaredites and the Nephites did, and thus “bringing down” their own people to destruction and “bringing down” the “fullness of the wrath of God” upon themselves, as the Jaredites and the Nephites both did.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [3443]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 31087  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘Creator of the First Day’ The Glossing of Lord of Sabaoth in D&C 95:7.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 22 (2016): 51-77.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The calqued name-title “Lord of Sabaoth,” echoing James 5:4, occurs four times in the Doctrine and Covenants in revelations given to the prophet Joseph Smith from December 25, 1832 to August 6, 1833. Of these occurrences, only D&C 95:7 offers a gloss or interpretation for the name “the Lord of Sabaoth,” which is, by interpretation, “the creator of the first day, the beginning and the end.” Upon close inspection, this explanation makes excellent sense from an ancient Israelite etiological as well as (perhaps) an etymological standpoint. Past criticisms of the gloss in D&C 95:7 have focused on the wrongly assumed incongruity of “first day” and “Sabaoth” (“hosts”), and have neglected function of the divine name Yhwh in titles, most often represented in scripture by the term “Lord,” as in the calqued name-title Lord of Hosts. Understanding the connection between Yhwh (the form of which suggests the meaning “He creates,” “He brings into existence,” “he brings to pass”), the divine council (the “hosts”), creation (on “the first day” or “Day One”), and the underlying grammatical meaning of “Lord of Hosts” = Yhwh ṣĕbāʾôt (i.e., “He creates the [heavenly] hosts” or “He brings to pass the [heavenly] hosts”) is crucial to understanding the calque “Lord of Sabaoth” and the explanation given in D&C 95:7. When considered in its entirety, this revealed gloss is right on target. The creation/‌begetting of the heavenly hosts was associated with “the first day” or “Day One” in ancient Israelite thought. They are described as “finished” or fully prepared by the end of the six creative periods (“days” in Genesis 2:1). Additionally, “Lord of Sabaoth” or Yhwh ṣĕbāʾôt is to be understood in connection with the similarly constructed name-title Yhwh ʾĕlōhîm (“He creates gods,” “he causes gods to be,” or “he brings to pass gods”). The meristic appositive title “the beginning and the end” implies that Yhwh is not only the “author”/“creator” of Israel and its salvation but the “finisher” thereof. Far from evidence of Joseph Smith’s lack of knowledge of Hebrew, the interpretive gloss in D&C 95:7 constitutes evidence of Joseph’s ability to obtain correct translations and interpretations through revelation.

ID = [3722]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  d-c,interpreter-journal  Size: 63083  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘Encircled About Eternally in the Arms of His Love’: The Divine Embrace as a Thematic Symbol of Jesus Christ and His Atonement in the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 59 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 59 (2023): 109-134.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: This study builds upon Hugh Nibley’s insightful observation that several Book of Mormon passages reflect “the ritual embrace that consummates the final escape from death in the Egyptian funerary texts and reliefs” as expressing the meaning of Christ’s Atonement. This study further extends Nibley’s observations on Jacob’s “wrestle” as a divine “embrace” to show that Lehi’s, Nephi’s, and their successors’ understanding of the divine embrace is informed by their ancestor’s “wrestle” with a “man” (Genesis 32:24–30) and reconciliation with his brother (Genesis 33:4–10). Examples of the divine embrace language and imagery throughout the Book of Mormon go well beyond what Nibley noted, evoking the Psalms’ depictions of Jehovah whose “wings” offered protection in the ritual place of atonement. Book of Mormon “divine embrace” texts have much to teach us about Jesus Christ, his love, the nature of his Atonement, and the temple.

Keywords: Bible; Book of Mormon; divine embrace; Genesis
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
ID = [81879]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 60320  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:16
Bowen, Matthew L. “Father Is a Man: The Remarkable Mention of the Name Abish in Alma 19:16 and Its Narrative Context.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 14 (2015): 77-93.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The mention of “Abish” and a “remarkable vision of her father” (Alma 19:16) is itself remarkable, since women and servants are rarely named in the Book of Mormon text. As a Hebrew/Lehite name, “Abish” suggests the meaning “Father is a man,” the midrashic components ʾab- (“father”) and ʾîš (“man”) being phonologically evident. Thus, the immediate juxtaposition of the name “Abish” with the terms “her father” and “women” raises the possibility of wordplay on her name in the underlying text. Since ʾab-names were frequently theophoric — i.e., they had reference to a divine Father (or could be so understood) — the mention of “Abish” (“Father is a man”) takes on additional theological significance in the context of Lamoni’s vision of the Redeemer being “born of a woman and … redeem[ing] all mankind” (Alma 19:13). The wordplay on “Abish” thus contributes thematically to the narrative’s presentation of Ammon’s typological ministrations among the Lamanites as a “man” endowed with great power, which helped the Lamanites understand the concept of “the Great Spirit” (Yahweh) becoming “man.” Moreover, this wordplay accords with the consistent Book of Mormon doctrine that the “very Eternal Father” would (and did) condescend to become “man” and Suffering Servant.

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Judges
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
ID = [4255]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 43554  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘For Their Good Have I Written Them’: The Onomastic Allusivity and Literary Function of 2 Nephi 25:8.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 53 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 53 (2022): 77-90.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: Nephi’s writings exhibit a distinctive focus on “good” and divine “goodness,” reflecting the meaning of Nephi’s Egyptian name (derived from nfr) meaning “good,” “goodly,” “fine,” or “fair.” Beyond the inclusio playing on his own name in terms of “good” and “goodness” (1 Nephi 1:1; 2 Nephi 33:3–4, 10, 12), he uses a similar inclusio (2 Nephi 5:30–31; 25:7–8) to frame and demarcate a smaller portion of his personal record in which he incorporated a substantial portion of the prophecies of Isaiah (2 Nephi 6–24). This smaller inclusio frames the Isaianic material as having been incorporated into Nephi’s “good” writings on the small plates with an express purpose: the present and future “good” of his and his brothers’ descendants down to the latter days.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; good; goodness; inclusio; Isaiah; Nephi; wordplay
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
ID = [81249]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 27075  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:12
Bowen, Matthew L. “Founded Upon a Rock: Doctrinal and Temple Implications of Peter’s Surnaming.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 9 (2014): 1-28.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The famous Petros/petra wordplay in Matthew 16:18 does not constitute Jesus’s identification of Peter as the “rock” upon which his church would be built. This wordplay does however identify him with that “rock” or “bedrock” inasmuch as Peter, a small “seer-stone,” had the potential to become like the Savior himself, “the Rock of ages.” One aspect of that “rock” is the revelation that comes through faith that Jesus is the Christ. Other aspects of that same rock are the other principles and ordinances of the gospel, including temple ordinances. The temple, a symbol of the Savior and his body, is a symbol of the eternal family—the “sure house” built upon a rock. As such, the temple is the perfect embodiment of Peter’s labor in the priesthood, against which hell will not prevail.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
ID = [4304]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2014-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 51456  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Bowen, Matthew L. “Getting Cain and Gain.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 15 (2015): 115-141.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The biblical etiology (story of origin) for the name “Cain” associates his name with the Hebrew verb qny/qnh, “to get,” “gain,” “acquire,” “create,” or “procreate” in a positive sense. A fuller form of this etiology, known to us indirectly through the Book of Mormon text and directly through the restored text of the Joseph Smith Translation, creates additional wordplay on “Cain” that associates his name with murder to “get gain.” This fuller narrative is thus also an etiology for organized evil—secret combinations “built up to get power and gain” (Ether 8:22–23; 11:15). The original etiology exerted a tremendous influence on Book of Mormon writers (e.g., Nephi, Jacob, Alma, Mormon, and Moroni) who frequently used allusions to this narrative and sometimes replicated the wordplay on “Cain” and “getting gain.” The fuller narrative seems to have exerted its greatest influence on Mormon and Moroni, who witnessed the destruction of their nation firsthand — destruction catalyzed by Cainitic secret combinations. Moroni, in particular, invokes the Cain etiology in describing the destruction of the Jaredites by secret combinations. The destruction of two nations by Cainitic secret combinations stand as two witnesses and a warning to latter-day Gentiles (and Israel) against building up these societies and allowing them to flourish.

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 4–6:12 — Grand Council in Heaven, Adam and Eve
ID = [4246]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,moses,old-test  Size: 63458  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘God Hath Taken Away His Plainness’: Some Notes on Jacob 4:14, Revelation, Canon, Covenant, and Law.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 39 (2020): 81-102.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: This article examines Jacob’s statement “God hath taken away his plainness from [the Jews]” (Jacob 4:14) as one of several scriptural texts employing language that revolves around the Deuteronomic canon formulae (Deuteronomy 4:2; 12:32 [13:1]; cf. Revelation 22:18‒19). It further examines the textual dependency of Jacob 4:13‒14 on Nephi’s earlier writings, 1 Nephi 13 and 2 Nephi 25 in particular. The three texts in the Hebrew Bible that use the verb bʾr (Deuteronomy 1:5; 27:8; Habakkuk 2:2) — each having covenant and “law” implications — all shed light on what Nephi and Jacob may have meant when they described “plain” writing, “plain and precious things [words],” “words of plainness,” etc. Jacob’s use of Zenos’s allegory of the olive tree as a means of describing the Lord’s restoring or re-“adding” what had been “taken away,” including his use of Isaiah 11:11 (Jacob 6:2) as a hermeneutical lens for the entire allegory, further connects everything from Jacob 4:14 (“God hath taken away”) to Jacob 6:2 with the name “Joseph.” Genesis etiologizes the name Joseph in terms of divine “taking away” (ʾāsap) and “adding” (yōsēp; Genesis 30:23‒24; cf. Numbers 36:1‒5). God’s “tak[ing] away his plainness” involved both divine and human agency, but the restoration of his plainness required divine agency. For Latter-day Saints, it is significant the Lord accomplished this through a “Joseph.”.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Enos
Book of Mormon Topics > Doctrines and Teachings > Plainness
ID = [3482]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 56344  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘He Did Go About Secretly’: Additional Thoughts on the Literary Use of Alma’s Name.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 27 (2017): 197-212.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Mormon describes Alma the Younger’s “go[ing] about secretly” to destroy the church that his father, Alma the Elder, had established (Mosiah 27:8–10), this as a narratalogical inversion of that period when Alma the Elder “went about privately” teaching the words of Abinadi and establishing a church “that it might not come to the knowledge of the king” (Mosiah 18:1–6). In Mosiah 27:10, Mormon subtly reworks Alma the Younger’s autobiographical statement preserved in Alma 36:6, adding in the former passage a word rendered “secretly” to create a midrashic or interpretive pun on the name Alma, echoing the meaning of the Semitic root ʿlm, “hide,” “conceal”). Mosiah 27:8–10 contains additional language that evokes the introduction of the name Alma in the Book of Mormon (at first in terms of ʿelem [“young man”] but also in terms of the homonymous root ʿlm) in Mosiah 17:2–4 but also re-invokes allusions in the latter passage to Mosiah 14:1 (Isaiah 53:1).

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
ID = [3670]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 31176  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘He Is a Good Man’: The Fulfillment of Helaman 5:6-7 in Helaman 8:7 and 11:18-19.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 17 (2016): 165-170.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Mormon, as an author and editor, was concerned to show the fulfillment of earlier Nephite prophecy when such fulfillment occurred. Mormon took care to show that Nephi and Lehi, the sons of Helaman, fulfilled their father’s prophetic and paranetic expectations regarding them as enshrined in their given names — the names of their “first parents.” It had been “said and also written” (Helaman 5:6-7) that Nephi’s and Lehi’s namesakes were “good” in 1 Nephi 1:1. Using onomastic play on the meaning of “Nephi,” Mormon demonstrates in Helaman 8:7 that it also came to be said and written of Nephi the son of Helaman that he was “good.” Moreover, Mormon shows Nephi that his brother Lehi was “not a whit behind him” in this regard (Helaman 11:19). During their lifetimes — i.e., during the time of the fulfillment of Mosiah’s forewarning regarding societal and political corruption (see Mosiah 29:27) that especially included secret combinations — Nephi and Lehi stood firm against increasingly popular organized evil.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
ID = [4217]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 12701  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L. “He Knows My Affliction: The Hill Onidah as Narrative Counterpart to the Rameumptom.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 34 (2020): 195-220.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The toponym Onidah, attested as the name of a hill in Alma 32:4, most plausibly derives from Hebrew ʿŏnî /ʿōnî/ʿônî (ʿonyî, “my affliction”) + yādaʿ/yēdaʿ (“he knew,” “he knows”) — i.e., “he has acknowledged my affliction” or “he knows my affliction.” This etymology finds support in the context of the Zoramite narrative in which it occurs. In view of the pejorative lexical associations of the Rameumptom, the “high” and “holy stand,” with Hebrew rām (< rwm, “high”) and haughtiness, arrogance, and pride, we see Mormon using the Rameumptom, the “high” platform for Zoramite self-exalting worship, with Onidah, the hill from which Alma and Amulek taught the Zoramite poor and humble. The latter name and Alma’s teaching from that location constituted a sign that the Lord “knew” their “affliction.” Alma devotes a significant part of his message not only extolling the spiritual value of their state of “affliction” and humiliation or compelled “humility” (ʿŏnî Exodus 3:7, 17), but teaching them how to “plant” the “word” (even Jesus Christ himself) in their hearts through prayer — the word that would grow up into a “perfect knowledge” of God — experientially “knowing” God (Alma 32:16‒36) and being known by him (cf. Alma 7:12).
“Though the Lord be high, yet hath he respect unto the lowly: but the proud he knoweth afar off.” (Psalms 138:6)
“It is good for me that I have been afflicted; that I might learn thy statutes. The law of thy mouth is better unto me than thousands of gold and silver.” (Psalms 119:71‒72)
“And the afflicted people thou wilt save: but thine eyes are upon the haughty, that thou mayest bring them down.” (2 Samuel 22:28).

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Topics > Places > Americas > Book of Mormon Geography > Onidah
Book of Mormon Topics > Literary and Textual Studies > Toponym
ID = [3552]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 63427  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘I Have Done According to My Will’: Reading Jacob 5 as a Temple Text.” Paper presented at the 2014 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. October 25, 2014.
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
ID = [6868]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2014-10-25  Collections:  bom,interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:51
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘I Kneeled Down Before My Maker’: Allusions to Esau in the Book of Enos.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 27 (2017): 29-56.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The Book of Enos constitutes a brief literary masterpiece. A close reading of Enos’s autobiography reveals textual dependency not only on 1 Nephi 1:1-2 and Genesis 32–33, but also on earlier parts of the Jacob Esau cycle in Genesis 25, 27. Enos’s autobiographical allusions to hunting and hungering serve as narrative inversions of Esau’s biography. The narrative of Genesis 27 exploits the name “Esau” in terms of the Hebrew verb ʿśh/ʿśy (“make,” “do”). Enos (“man”) himself incorporates paronomastic allusions to the name “Esau” in terms of ʿśh/ʿśy in surprising and subtle ways in order to illustrate his own transformation through the Atonement of Jesus Christ. These wordplays reflect the convergence (in the Genesis narratives) of the figure of Esau before whom Jacob bows and whom he embraces in reconciliation with the figure of the divine “man” with whom Jacob wrestles. Finally, Enos anticipates his own resurrection, divine transformation, and final at-one-ment with the Lord in terms of a clothing metaphor reminiscent of Jacob’s “putting on” Esau’s identity in Genesis 27.

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Enos
ID = [3660]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 62965  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘I of Myself Am a Wicked Man’: Some Notes on Allusion and Textual Dependency in Omni 1:1-2.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 40 (2020): 71-88.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Omni greatly revered his ancestors and their personal accounts on the small plates of Nephi. A close examination of Omni’s brief autobiography (Omni 1:1–3) evidences borrowing from all four of his predecessors’ writings. Moreover, his self-description, “I of myself am a wicked man,” constitutes far more than a confession of religious dereliction. That self-assessment alludes to Nephi’s autobiographical wordplay on his name in terms “good” and “having been born of goodly parents” and his grandfather Enos’s similarly self-referential wordplay in describing his own father Jacob as a “just man.” Omni’s name most likely represents a hypocoristic form of a longer theophoric name, *ʾomnîyyāhû (from the root *ʾmn), meaning “Yahweh is [the object of] my faith” or “Yahweh is my guardian [or, nursing father],” but could also be heard or understood as a gentilic, “faithful one” or “trustworthy one.” These observations have implications for Omni’s stated defense of his people the Nephites (traditionally, the “good” or “fair ones”) against the Lamanites, those who had dwindled in “unbelief” (cf. Hebrew lōʾ-ʾēmun). In the end, Omni’s description of himself as “a wicked man” should be viewed in the context of his reverence for “goodly” and “just” ancestors and brought into balance with those sacred trusts in which he did prove faithful: preserving his people, his genealogy, and the small plates themselves.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Enos
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jarom
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Omni
Book of Mormon Topics > Persons and Peoples > Omni
Book of Mormon Topics > Literary and Textual Studies > Proper Names
Book of Mormon Topics > Literary and Textual Studies > Wordplay
ID = [3469]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 40312  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘I Will Deliver Thy Sons’: An Onomastic Approach to Three Iterations of an Oracle to Mosiah II (Mosiah 28:7; Alma 17:35, 19:23).” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 41 (2020): 241-256.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Three times in his narrative Mormon recounts the Lord’s oracle (revelation) to Mosiah II regarding his sons undertaking a mission among the Lamanites (Mosiah 28:7, Alma 17:35, and Alma 19:23). In all three instances, the Lord’s promises of deliverance revolve around the meaning of the name Mosiah (“Yahweh is Deliverer” or “Yahweh is Savior”), emphasizing that the Lord (Hebrew yhwh) himself would act in his covenant role as môšîaʿ in delivering Mosiah’s sons, and sparing Ammon in particular. In two of the iterations of the oracle, Mosiah 28:7 and Alma 19:23, we find additional wordplay on the name Ammon (“faithful”) in terms of “many shall believe” (Hebrew yaʾămînû) in the first instance and ʾĕmûnâ (“faith,” “faithfulness”) in the latter. In Alma 19:23 the Lord also employs an additional wordplay on his own name, Yahweh (Jehovah), to emphasize his ability to bring to pass his promises to Mosiah regarding Ammon.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Topics > Literary and Textual Studies > Wordplay
Book of Mormon Topics > Doctrines and Teachings > Deliver
ID = [3460]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 36390  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘If Ye Believe on His Name’: Wordplay on the Name Samuel in Helaman 14:2, 12–13 and 3 Nephi 23:9 and the Doctrine of Christ in Samuel’s Speech.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 46 (2021): 49-76.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The Semitic/Hebrew name Samuel (šĕmûʾēl) most likely means “his name is El” — i.e., “his name [the name that he calls upon in worship] is El” — although it was also associated with “hearing” (šāmaʿ) God (e.g., 1 Samuel 3:9–11). In the ancient Near East, the parental hope for one thus named is that the son (and “his name”) would glorify El (a name later understood in ancient Israel to refer to God); or, like the biblical prophet Samuel, the child would hear El/God (“El is heard”). The name šĕmûʾēl thus constituted an appropriate symbol of the mission of the Son of God who “glorified the name of the Father” (Ether 12:8), was perfectly obedient to the Father in all things, and was the Prophet like Moses par excellence, whom Israel was to “hear” or “hearken” in all things (Deuteronomy 18:15; 1 Nephi 22:20; 3 Nephi 20:32). Jesus may have referred to this in a wordplay on the name Samuel when he said: “I commanded my servant Samuel, the Lamanite, that he should testify unto this people, that at the day that the Father should glorify his name in me that there were many saints who should arise from the dead” (3 Nephi 23:9). Samuel the Lamanite had particularly emphasized “believ[ing] on the name” of God’s Son in the second part of his speech (see Helaman 14:2, 12–13) in advance of the latter’s coming. Samuel thus seems to use a recurrent or thematic rhetorical wordplay on his own name as an entry point to calling the Nephites to repent and return to living the doctrine of Christ, which activates the blessings of the atonement of Jesus Christ. Mormon took great care to show that all of the signs and prophecies that Samuel gave the Nephites of Zarahemla were fulfilled at the time of Jesus’s birth, death, and resurrection as Jesus glorified the Father’s name in every particular, and found further fulfillment in some particulars during Mormon’s own life and times.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
ID = [3383]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 63481  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘If Ye Will Hearken’: Lehi’s Rhetorical Wordplay on Ishmael in 2 Nephi 1:28–29 and Its Implications.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 25 (2017): 157-189.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Nephi’s preservation of the conditional “first blessing” that Lehi bestowed upon his elder sons (Laman, Lemuel, and Sam) and the sons of Ishmael, contains a dramatic wordplay on the name Ishmael in 2 Nephi 1:28–29. The name Ishmael — “May El hear [him],” “May El hearken,” or “El Has Hearkened” — derives from the Semitic (and later Hebrew) verb šāmaʿ (to “hear,” “hearken,” or “obey”). Lehi’s rhetorical wordplay juxtaposes the name Ishmael with a clustering of the verbs “obey” and “hearken,” both usually represented in Hebrew by the verb šāmaʿ. Lehi’s blessing is predicated on his sons’ and the sons of Ishmael’s “hearkening” to Nephi (“if ye will hearken”). Conversely, failure to “hearken” (“but if ye will not hearken”) would precipitate withdrawal of the “first blessing.” Accordingly, when Nephi was forced to flee from Laman, Lemuel, and the sons of Ishmael, Lehi’s “first blessing” was activated for Nephi and all those who “hearkened” to his spiritual leadership, including members of Ishmael’s family (2 Nephi 5:6), while it was withdrawn from Laman, Lemuel, the sons of Ishmael, and those who sympathized with them, “inasmuch as they [would] not hearken” unto Nephi (2 Nephi 5:20). Centuries later, when Ammon and his brothers convert many Lamanites to the truth, Mormon revisits Lehi’s conditional blessing and the issue of “hearkening” in terms of Ishmael and the receptivity of the Ishmaelites. Many Ishmaelite-Lamanites “hear” or “hearken” to Ammon et al., activating Lehi’s “first blessing,” while many others — including the ex-Nephite Amalekites/Amlicites — do not, thus activating (or reactivating) Lehi’s curse.

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
ID = [3692]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 63457  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘In the Mount of the Lord It Shall Be Seen’ and ‘Provided’: Theophany and Sacrifice as the Etiological Foundation of the Temple in Israelite and Latter-day Saint Tradition.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 5 (2013): 201-223.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: For ancient Israelites, the temple was a place where sacrifice and theophany (i.e., seeing God or other heavenly beings) converged. The account of Abraham’s “arrested” sacrifice of Isaac (Genesis 22) and the account of the arrested slaughter of Jerusalem following David’s unauthorized census of Israel (2 Samuel 24; 1 Chronicles 21) served as etiological narratives—explanations of “cause” or “origin”—for the location of the Jerusalem temple and its sacrifices. Wordplay on the verb rāʾâ (to “see”) in these narratives creates an etiological link between the place-names “Jehovah-jireh,” “Moriah” and the threshing floor of Araunah/Ornan, pointing to the future location of the Jerusalem temple as the place of theophany and sacrifice par excellence. Isaac’s arrested sacrifice and the vicarious animal sacrifices of the temple anticipated Jesus’s later “un-arrested” sacrifice since, as Jesus himself stated, “Abraham rejoiced to see my day” (John 8:56). Sacrifice itself was a kind of theophany in which one’s own redemption could be “seen” and the scriptures of the Restoration confirm that Abraham and many others, even “a great many thousand years before” the coming of Christ, “saw” Jesus’s sacrifice and “rejoiced.” Additionally, theophany and sacrifice converge in the canonized revelations regarding the building of the latter-day temple. These temple revelations begin with a promise of theophany, and mandate sacrifice from the Latter-day Saints. In essence, the temple itself was, and is, Christ’s atonement having its intended effect on humanity. .

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Old Testament Scriptures > Exodus
Old Testament Scriptures > 1 & 2 Samuel
Old Testament Scriptures > 1 & 2 Kings/1 & 2 Chronicles
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
ID = [4354]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2013-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,moses,old-test  Size: 56711  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Bowen, Matthew L. “Jacob’s Protector.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 27 (2017): 229-256.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The name Jacob (yaʿăqōb) means “may he [i.e., God] protect,” or “he has protected.” As a hypocoristic masculine volitive verbal form,
it is a kind of blessing upon, or prayer on behalf of the one so named that he will receive divine protection and safety (cf. Deuteronomy 33:28). Textual evidence from Nephi’s writings suggests that his brother Jacob’s protection was a primary concern of their parents, Lehi and Sariah. Lehi saw Nephi as the specific means of divine protection for Jacob, his “first born in the wilderness.” Moreover, the term “protector” is used twice in LDS scripture, in both instances by Jacob himself (2 Nephi 6:2; Jacob 1:10), this in reference to Nephi, who became the “great protector” of the Nephites in general and Jacob in particular. All of the foregoing is to be understood against the backdrop of the patriarch Jacob’s biography. Lehi, Nephi, Jacob, and Enos all expressed their redemption in terms reminiscent of their ancestor Jacob’s being “redeemed … from all evil,” a process which included Jacob “wrestling” a divine “man” and preparing him to be reconciled to his estranged brother by an atoning “embrace.” Mormon employed the biblical literary etymology of the name Jacob, in the terms “supplant,” “usurp,” or “rob” as a basis for Lamanite accusations that Nephites had usurped them or “robbed” them of their birthright. Mormon, aware of the high irony, shows that the Gadianton [Gaddianton] robbers take up the same polemic. The faithful Lehites, many of whom were descendants of two Jacobs, prayed “May the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, protect this people in righteousness, so long as they shall call on the name of their God for protection” (3 Nephi 4:30). By and large, they enjoyed the God of Jacob’s protection until they ceased to call upon their true protector for it.

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Old Testament Scriptures > Deuteronomy
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Enos
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
ID = [3674]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 63356  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘The Lord God Will Proceed’: Nephi’s Wordplay in 1 Nephi 22:8–12 and the Abrahamic Covenant.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 50 (2022): 51-70.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: Nephi quotes or alludes to four distinct Old Testament passages — Genesis 22:18; Isaiah 29:14; Isaiah 49:22–23; and Isaiah 52:10 — twice each in 1 Nephi 22:6, 8–12. These four texts form the basis of his description of how the Lord would bring to pass the complete fulfillment of the promises in the Abrahamic covenant for the salvation of the human family. These texts’ shared use of the Hebrew word gôyim (“nations” [> kindreds], “Gentiles”) provides the lexical basis for Nephi’s quotation and interpretation of these texts in light of each other. Nephi uses these texts to prophesy that the Lord would act in the latter-days for the salvation of the human family. However, Nephi uses Isaiah 29:14 with its key-word yôsīp (yôsip) to assert that iterative divine action to fulfill the Abrahamic covenant — taking the form of “a marvelous work and a wonder” — would be accomplished through a “Joseph.” Onomastic wordplay involving the names Abram⁄Abraham and Joseph constitute key elements in 1 Nephi 22:8–12.

Keywords: Abrahamic covenant; Book of Mormon; Nephi; onomastic wordplay
Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Old Testament Scriptures > Isaiah
ID = [8436]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-00-00  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 49047  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:53:56
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., and Matthew L. Bowen. “‘Made Stronger Than Many Waters’: The Purported Sacred Names of Moses as a Series of Keywords.” Paper presented at the 2020 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. November 7, 2020.
ID = [6790]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-11-07  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:51
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., and Matthew L. Bowen. “‘Made Stronger Than Many Waters’: The Purported Sacred Names of Moses as a Series of Keywords.” In Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, Volume 2. Edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon, 943–1000. Orem, UT; Springville, UT; Redding, CA; Tooele, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, and Eborn Books, 2021.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 1 — Visions of Moses
Book of Moses Topics > Temple Themes in the Book of Moses and Related Scripture
ID = [4654]  Status = Type = book chapter  Date = 2021-08-04  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:03
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘The Messenger of Salvation’: The Messenger-Message Christology of D&C 93:8 and Its Implications for Latter-day Saint Missionary Work and Temple Worship.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 51 (2022): 1-28.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: Several of the Prophet Joseph Smith’s earliest revelations, beginning with Moroni’s appearance in 1823, quote the prophecy of Malachi 3:1 with the Lord “suddenly com[ing] to his temple” as “messenger of the covenant.” Malachi 3:1 and its quoted iterations in 3 Nephi 24:1; Doctrine and Covenants 36:8; 42:36; 133:2 not only impressed upon Joseph and early Church members the urgency of building a temple to which the Lord could come, but also presented him as the messenger of the Father’s restored covenant. Malachi’s prophecy concords with the restored portion of the “fulness of the record of John” and its “messenger” Christology in D&C 93:8 in which Jesus Christ is both “the messenger of salvation” (the “Word”) and the Message (also “the Word”). The ontological kinship of God the Father with Jesus, angels (literally messengers), and humankind in Joseph’s early revelations lays the groundwork for the doctrine of humankind’s coeternality with God (D&C 93:29), and the notion that through “worship” one can “come unto the Father in [Jesus’s] name, and in due time receive of his fulness” (D&C 93:19; cf. D&C 88:29). D&C 88 specifies missionary work and ritual washing of the feet as a means of becoming, through the atonement of Jesus Christ, “clean from the blood of this generation” (D&C 88:75, 85, 138). Such ritual washings continued as a part of the endowment that was revealed to Joseph Smith during the Nauvoo period. Missionary work itself constitutes a form of worship, and temple worship today continues to revolve around missionary work for the living (the endowment) and for the dead (ordinances). The endowment, like the visions in which prophets were given special missionary commissions, [Page 2]situates us ritually in the divine council, teaches us about the great Messenger of salvation, and empowers us to participate in his great mission of saving souls.

Keywords: Church history; Malachi 3:1; messenger of the covenant; temples
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
Old Testament Scriptures > Twelve Minor Prophets
ID = [12566]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-01  Collections:  bom,d-c,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 67872  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Bowen, Matthew L. “Messengers of the Covenant: Mormon’s Doctrinal Use of Malachi 3:1 in Moroni 7:29–32.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 31 (2019): 111-138.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Although not evident at first glance, shared terminology and phraseology in Malachi 3:1 (3 Nephi 24:1) and Moroni 7:29–32 suggest textual dependency of the latter on the former. Jesus’s dictation of Malachi 3–4 to the Lamanites and Nephites at the temple in Bountiful, as recorded and preserved on the plates of Nephi, helped provide Mormon a partial scriptural and doctrinal basis for his teachings on the ministering of angels, angels/messengers of the covenant, the “work” of “the covenants of the Father,” and “prepar[ing] the way” in his sermon as preserved in Moroni 7. This article explores the implications of Mormon’s use of Malachi 3:1. It further explores the meaning of the name Malachi (“[Yahweh is] my messenger,” “my angel”) in its ancient Israelite scriptural context and the temple context within which Jesus uses it in 3 Nephi 24:1.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
Old Testament Scriptures > Isaiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
Old Testament Scriptures > Twelve Minor Prophets
ID = [3591]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 63497  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘The Messiah Will Set Himself Again’: Jacob’s Use of Isaiah 11:11 in 2 Nephi 6:14 and Jacob 6:2.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 44 (2021): 287-306.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In sermons and writings, Jacob twice quotes the prophecy of Isaiah 11:11 (“the Lord [ʾădōnāy] shall set his hand again [yôsîp] the second time to gather the remnant of his people”). In 2 Nephi 6:14 and Jacob 6:2, Jacob uses Isaiah 11:11 as a lens through which he interprets much lengthier prophetic texts that detail the restoration, redemption, and gathering of Israel: namely, Isaiah 49:22–52:2 and Zenos’s Allegory of the Olive Trees (Jacob 5). In using Isaiah 11:11 in 2 Nephi 6:14, Jacob, consistent with the teaching of his father Lehi (2 Nephi 2:6), identifies ʾădōnāy (“the Lord”) in Isaiah 11:11 as “the Messiah” and the one who will “set himself again the second time to recover” his people (both Israel and the righteous Gentiles who “believe in him”) and “manifest himself unto them in great glory.” This recovery and restoration will be so thoroughgoing as to include the resurrection of the dead (see 2 Nephi 9:1–2, 12–13). In Jacob 6:2, Jacob equates the image of the Lord “set[ting] his hand again [yôsîp] the second time to recover his people” (Isaiah 11:11) to the Lord of the vineyard’s “labor[ing] in” and “nourish[ing] again” the vineyard to “bring forth again” (cf. Hebrew yôsîp) the natural fruit (Jacob 5:29–33, 51–77) into the vineyard. All of this suggests that Jacob saw Isaiah 49:22–52:2 and Zenos’s allegory (Jacob 5) as telling essentially the same story. For Jacob, the prophetic declaration of Isaiah 11:11 concisely summed up this story, describing divine initiative and iterative action to “recover” or gather Israel in terms of the verb yôsîp. Jacob, foresaw this the divine action as being accomplished through the “servant” and “servants” in Isaiah 49–52, “servants” analogous to those described by Zenos in his allegory. For Jacob, the idiomatic use of yôsîp in Isaiah 11:11 as he quotes it in 2 Nephi 6:14 and Jacob 6:2 and as repeated throughout Zenos’s allegory (Jacob 5) reinforces the patriarch Joseph’s statement preserved in 2 Nephi 3 that this figure would be a “Joseph” (yôsēp).

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Enos
Old Testament Scriptures > Isaiah
ID = [3422]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 53981  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘Most Desirable Above All Things’: Onomastic Play on Mary and Mormon in the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 13 (2015): 27-61.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The names Mary and Mormon most plausibly derive from the Egyptian word mr(i), “love, desire, [or] wish.” Mary denotes “beloved [i.e., of deity]” and is thus conceptually connected with divine love, while Mormon evidently denotes “desire/love is enduring.” The text of the Book of Mormon manifests authorial awareness of the meanings of both names, playing on them in multiple instances. Upon seeing Mary (“the mother of God,” 1 Nephi 11:18, critical text) bearing the infant Messiah in her arms in vision, Nephi, who already knew that God “loveth his children,” came to understand that the meaning of the fruit-bearing tree of life “is the love of God, which sheddeth itself abroad in the hearts of the children of men; wherefore it is the most desirable above all things” (1 Nephi 11:17-25). Later, Alma the Elder and his people entered into a covenant and formed a church based on “love” and “good desires” (Mosiah 18:21, 28), a covenant directly tied to the waters of Mormon: Behold here are the waters of Mormon … and now, as ye are desirous to come into the fold of God … if this be the desire of your hearts, what have you against being baptized …?”; “they clapped their hands for joy and exclaimed: This is the desire of our hearts” (Mosiah 18:8-11). Alma the Younger later recalled the “song of redeeming love” that his father and others had sung at the waters of Mormon (Alma 5:3-9, 26; see Mosiah 18:30). Our editor, Mormon, who was himself named after the land of Mormon and its waters (3 Nephi 5:12), repeatedly spoke of charity as “everlasting love” or the “pure love of Christ [that] endureth forever” (Moroni 7:47-48; 8:16-17; 26). All of this has implications for Latter-day Saints or “Mormons” who, as children of the covenant, must endure to the end in Christlike “love” as Mormon and Moroni did, particularly in days of diminishing faith, faithfulness, and love (see, e.g., Mormon 3:12; contrast Moroni 9:5).

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [4267]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 63213  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘My People Are Willing’: The Mention of Aminadab in the Narrative Context of Helaman 5-6.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 19 (2016): 83-107.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Aminadab, a Nephite by birth who later dissented to the Lamanites, played a crucial role in the mass conversion of three hundred Lamanites (and eventually many others). At the end of the pericope in which these events are recorded, Mormon states: “And thus we see that the Lord began to pour out his Spirit upon the Lamanites, because of their easiness and willingness to believe in his words” (Helaman 6:36), whereas he “began to withdraw” his Spirit from the Nephites “because of the wickedness and the hardness of their hearts” (Helaman 6:35). The name Aminadab is a Semitic/Hebrew name meaning “my kinsman is willing” or “my people are willing.” As a dissenter, Aminadab was a man of two peoples. Mormon and (probably) his source were aware of the meaning of Aminadab’s name and the irony of that meaning in the context of the latter’s role in the Lamanite conversions and the spiritual history of the Nephites and Lamanites. The narrative’s mention of Aminadab’s name (Helaman 5:39, 41) and Mormon’s echoes of it in Helaman 6:36, 3 Nephi 6:14, and elsewhere have covenant and temple significance not only in their ancient scriptural setting, but for latter-day readers of the Book of Mormon today.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
ID = [3760]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 63110  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L. Name as Key-Word: Collected Essays on Onomastic Wordplay and the Temple in Mormon Scripture. Orem and Salt Lake City, UT: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2018.
Display Abstract  

Throughout the Bible, understanding the meaning of names of important people and places is often crucial to understanding the message of the ancient authors. In other words, names of people and places serve as \"key-words\" that can help unlock the intended messages of scripture.Since the Book of Mormon is an ancient record rooted in Old Testament traditions, it is not surprising that similar patterns of wordplay emerge from its pages. Besides their important tole as key-words in scriptural interpretation, the names of people and places may also provide our clearest glimpses into the text that existed on the plates from which Joseph Smith translated the Book of Mormon. In many instances, the names of important Book of Mormon people and places are directly related to words matching the most-likely Hebrew and Egyptian origins for those names. Textual and contextual clues suggest that this matching was done deliberately in order to enhance literary beauty and as an aid to understanding. In some cases, authorial wordplay can be verified by a close analysis of matching text structures. In others, the wordplay can be verified by using the Bible as a \"control\" text. A wealth of philological, onomastic, and textual evidence suggests that the Book of Mormon, like the Bible, is the work of ancient authors rather than of a rural nineteenth-century man of limited literary attainments. Knowing more about these names enriches our understanding of the stories that these authors tell.

ID = [6733]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:50
Bowen, Matthew L. “Nephi’s Good Inclusio.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 17 (2016): 181-195.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: As John Gee noted two decades ago, Nephi is best explained as a form of the Egyptian word nfr, which by Lehi’s time was pronounced neh-fee, nay-fee, or nou-fee. Since this word means “good,” “goodly,” “fine,” or “fair,” I subsequently posited several possible examples of wordplay on the name Nephi in the Book of Mormon, including Nephi’s own autobiographical introduction (1 Nephi 1:1: “I, Nephi, having been born of goodly parents … having had a great knowledge of the goodness and the mysteries of God”). It should be further pointed out, however, that Nephi also concludes his personal writings on the small plates using the terms “good” and “goodness of God.” This terminological bracketing constitutes a literary device, used anciently, called inclusio or an envelope figure. Nephi’s literary emphasis on “good” and “goodness” not only befits his personal name, but fulfills the Lord’s commandment, “thou shalt engraven many things … which are good in my sight” (2 Nephi 5:30), a command which also plays on the name Nephi. Nephi’s autobiographical introduction and conclusion proved enormously influential on subsequent writers who modeled autobiographical and narrative biographical introductions on 1 Nephi 1:1-2 and based sermons — especially concluding sermons — on Nephi’s “good” conclusion in 2 Nephi 33. An emphasis in all these sermons is that all “good”/“goodness” ultimately has its source in God and Christ.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Enos
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Omni
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
ID = [4220]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 36814  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L. “Not Leaving and Going On to Perfection.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 16 (2015): 131-150.
Display Abstract  

A Review of Samuel M. Brown’s First Principles and Ordinances: The Fourth Article of Faith in Light of the Temple, Provo, UT: Neal A. Maxwell Institute, 2014. 167 pp., index. $16.95.

ID = [4230]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 51267  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘O Ye Fair Ones’ — Revisited.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 20 (2016): 315-344.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The best explanation for the name “Nephi” is that it derives from the Egyptian word nfr, “good,” “goodly,” “fine,” “fair,” “beautiful.” Nephi’s autobiographical wordplay on his own name in his self-introduction (and elsewhere throughout his writings) revolves around the evident meaning of his name. This has important implications for how the derived gentilic term “Nephites” was understood over time, especially among the Nephites themselves. Nephi’s early ethno-cultural descriptions of his people describe them as “fair” and “beautiful” (vis-à-vis the Lamanites). These early descriptions subsequently become the basis for Nephite ethno-cultural self-perceptions. The Nephites’ supposition that they were the “good” or “fair ones” was all too frequently at odds with reality, especially when Nephite “chosenness” was understood as inherent or innate. In the end the “good” or “fair ones” fell (Mormon 6:17‒20), because they came to “delight in everything save that which is good” (Moroni 9:19). The Book of Mormon thus constitutes a warning against our own contemporary cultural and religious tendency toward exceptionalism. Mormon and Moroni, like Nephi their ancestor through his writings on the small plates, endeavor through their own writing and editorial work to show how the “unbelieving” descendants of the Nephites and Lamanites can again become the “good” and the “fair ones” by choosing to come unto Christ, partaking of his “goodness,” and doing the “good” stipulated by the doctrine of Christ.
.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [3753]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 63414  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L. “Onomastic Wordplay on Joseph and Benjamin and Gezera Shawa in the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 18 (2016): 255-273.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The Book of Mormon contains several quotations from the Hebrew Bible that have been juxtaposed on the basis of shared words or phrases, this for the purpose of interpreting the cited scriptural passages in light of one another. This exegetical technique — one that Jesus himself used — came to be known in later rabbinic times as Gezera Shawa (“equal statute”). In several additional instances, the use of Gezera Shawa converges with onomastic wordplay. Nephi uses a Gezera Shawa involving Isaiah 11:11 and Isaiah 29:14 twice on the basis of the yāsap verb forms yôsîp/yôsīp (2 Nephi 25:17 and quoting the Lord in 2 Nephi 29:1) to create a stunning wordplay on the name “Joseph.” In another instance, King Benjamin uses Gezera Shawa involving Psalm 2:7, 2 Samuel 7:14, and Deuteronomy 14:1 (1–2) on the basis of the Hebrew noun bēn (“son”; plural bānîm, bānôt, “sons” and “daughters”) on which to build a rhetorical wordplay on his own name. This second wordplay, which further alludes to Psalm 110:1 on account of the noun yāmin (“right hand”), was ready-made for his temple audience who, on the occasion of Mosiah’s coronation, were receiving their own “endowment” to become “sons” and “daughters” at God’s “right hand.” The use of Gezera Shawa was often christological — e.g., Jacob’s Gezera Shawa on (“stone”) in Jacob 4:15–17 and Alma’s Gezera Shawa on Zenos’s and Zenock’s phrase “because of thy Son” in Alma 33:11–16 (see Alma 33:4 17). Taken together, these examples suggest that we should pay more attention to scripture’s use of scripture and, in particular, the use of this exegetical practice. In doing so, we will better discern the messages intended by ancient prophets whose words the Book of Mormon preserves.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Enos
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
ID = [4409]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 49682  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:01
Bowen, Matthew L., and Pedro Olavarria. “Place of Crushing: The Literary Function of Heshlon in Ether 13:25-31.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 14 (2015): 227-239.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The name Heshlon, attested once (in Ether 13:28), as a toponym in the Book of Mormon most plausibly denotes “place of crushing.” The meaning of Heshlon thus becomes very significant in the context of Ether 13:25–31, which describes the crushing or enfeebling of Coriantumr’s armies and royal power. This meaning is also significant in the wider context of Moroni’s narrative of the Jaredites’ destruction. Fittingly, the name Heshlon itself serves as a literary turning point in a chiastic structure which describes the fateful reversal of Coriantumr’s individual fortunes and the worsening of the Jaredites’ collective fortunes. Perhaps Moroni, who witnessed the gradual crushing and destruction of the Nephites, mentioned this name in his abridgement of the Book of Ether on account of the high irony of its meaning in view of the Jaredite war of attrition which served as precursor to the destruction of the Nephites.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [4262]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 32282  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘Possess the Land in Peace’: Zeniff’s Ironic Wordplay on Shilom.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 28 (2018): 115-120.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The toponym Shilom likely derives from the Semitic/Hebrew root š-l-m, whence also the similar-sounding word šālôm, “peace,” derives. The first mention of the toponym Shilom in Zeniff’s record — an older account than the surrounding material and an autobiography — occurs in Mosiah 9:6 in parallel with Zeniff’s mention of his intention to “possess the land in peace” (Mosiah 9:5). The language and text structure of Mosiah 9:5‒6 thus suggest a deliberate wordplay on Shilom in terms of šālôm. Zeniff uses the name Shilom as a point of irony throughout his brief royal record to emphasize a tenuous and often absent peace between his people and the Lamanites.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
ID = [3645]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 8684  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bowen, Matthew L. “Putting Down the Priests: A Note on Royal Evaluations, (wĕ)hišbît, and Priestly Purges in 2 Kings 23:5 and Mosiah 11:5.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 51 (2022): 105-114.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: The historian who wrote 2 Kings 23:5 and Mormon, who wrote Mosiah 11:5, used identical expressions to describe King Josiah’s and King Noah’s purges of the priests previously ordained and installed by their fathers. These purges came to define their respective kingships. The biblical writer used this language to positively evaluate Josiah’s kingship (“And he put down [w<ĕhišbît] the idolatrous priests whom the kings of Judah had ordained”), whereas Mormon levies a negative evaluation against Noah (“For he put down [cf. Hebrew (wĕ)hišbît] all the priests that had been consecrated by his father”). Mormon employs additional “Deuteronomistic” language in evaluating Mosiah, Noah, and other dynastic Book of Mormon leaders, suggesting that the evident contrast between King Noah and King Josiah is deliberately made.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; idolatry; Josiah; King Noah; priests
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Old Testament Scriptures > 1 & 2 Kings/1 & 2 Chronicles
ID = [12569]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 21448  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Bowen, Matthew L. “The Scalp of Your Head: Polysemy in Alma 44:14–18.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 20 (2016): 39-45.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The fear that Moroni’s soldier’s speech (Alma 44:14) aroused in the Lamanite soldiers and the intensity of Zerahemnah’s subsequently redoubled anger are best explained by the polysemy (i.e., multiple meanings within a lexeme’s range of meaning) of a single word translated “chief” in Alma 44:14 and “heads” in Alma 44:18. As editor of a sacred history, Mormon was interested in showing the fulfilment of prophecy when such fulfilment occurred. Mormon’s description of the Lamanites “fall[ing] exceedingly fast” because of the exposure of the Lamanites’ “bare heads” to the Nephites’ swords and their being “smitten” in Alma 44:18 — just as “the scalp of their chief” was smitten and thus fell (Alma 44:12–14) — pointedly demonstrates the fulfilment of the soldier’s prophecy. In particular, the phrase “bare heads” constitutes a polysemic wordplay on “chief,” since words translated “head” can alternatively be translated “chief,” as in Alma 44:14. A similar wordplay on “top” and “leader” in 3 Nephi 4:28–29, probably again represented by a single word, also partly explains the force of the simile curse described there.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [3746]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 15432  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘See That Ye Are Not Lifted Up’: The Name Zoram and Its Paronomastic Pejoration.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 19 (2016): 109-143.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The most likely etymology for the name Zoram is a third person singular perfect qal or pôʿal form of the Semitic/Hebrew verb *zrm, with the meaning, “He [God] has [is] poured forth in floods.” However, the name could also have been heard and interpreted as a theophoric –rām name, of which there are many in the biblical Hebrew onomasticon (Ram, Abram, Abiram, Joram/Jehoram, Malchiram, etc., cf. Hiram [Hyrum]/Huram). So analyzed, Zoram would connote something like “the one who is high,” “the one who is exalted” or even “the person of the Exalted One [or high place].” This has important implications for the pejoration of the name Zoram and its gentilic derivative Zoramites in Alma’s and Mormon’s account of the Zoramite apostasy and the attempts made to rectify it in Alma 31–35 (cf. Alma 38–39). The Rameumptom is also described as a high “stand” or “a place for standing, high above the head” (Heb. rām; Alma 31:13) — not unlike the “great and spacious building” (which “stood as it were in the air, high above the earth”; see 1 Nephi 8:26) — which suggests a double wordplay on the name “Zoram” in terms of rām and Rameumptom in Alma 31. Moreover, Alma plays on the idea of Zoramites as those being “high” or “lifted up” when counseling his son Shiblon to avoid being like the Zoramites and replicating the mistakes of his brother Corianton (Alma 38:3-5, 11-14). Mormon, perhaps influenced by the Zoramite apostasy and the magnitude of its effects, may have incorporated further pejorative wordplay on the Zoram-derived names Cezoram and Seezoram in order to emphasize that the Nephites had become lifted up in pride like the Zoramites during the judgeships of those judges. The Zoramites and their apostasy represent a type of Latter-day Gentile pride and apostasy, which Nephi, Mormon, and Moroni took great pains to warn against.
“For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted” (Luke 14:11).

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Old Testament Scriptures > Deuteronomy
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 4 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [3761]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 63846  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L. “Shazer: An Etymological Proposal in Narrative Context.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 33 (2019): 1-12.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In 1 Nephi 16:13–14, Nephi mentions the name Shazer as a toponym the Lehite clan bestowed on a site in western Arabia “four days” journey south-southeast of the valley of Laman. The Lehites used this site as a base camp for a major hunting expedition. A footnote to the first mention of the name Shazer in the 1981 and 2013 Latter-day Saint editions of the Book of Mormon has virtually enshrined “twisting, intertwining” as the presumed meaning of this toponym. However, the structure of Nephi’s text in 1 Nephi 16:12–13 suggests that the name Shazer serves as the bracketing for a chiastic description of the Lehites’ hunting expedition from the site. This chiasm recommends hunting as a possible starting point for seeking a more precise etymology for Shazer, one related to food supply. Consequently, I briefly argue for Shazer as a Semitic word (possibly also a loanword from an Old Arabic dialect) and a close cognate with both Hismaic šaṣar (“young gazelle,” plural šaṣr) and Arabic šaṣara (a type of “gazelle”).

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
ID = [3558]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 23222  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘Swearing by Their Everlasting Maker’: Some Notes on Paanchi and Giddianhi.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 28 (2018): 155-170.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: This brief article explores Paanchi and Giddianhi as names evidencing the Egyptian onomastic element –anchi/anhi/ʿnḫ(i) and the potential literary significance of these two names in the context of Mormon’s narrative detailing the formation of the oath-bound secret combinations sworn with oath-formulae upon one’s “life” (cf. Egyptian ʿnḫ, “life”; “live”; “swear an oath [by one’s life]”). It also explores the implications for Mormon’s telling of Nephite history during his own time.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
ID = [3648]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 39973  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., Matthew L. Bowen, and Ryan Dahle. “Textual Criticism and the Book of Moses: A Response to Colby Townsend’s ‘Returning to the Sources,’ Part 1 of 2.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 40 (2020): 99-162.
Display Abstract  

Review of Colby Townsend, “Returning to the Sources: Integrating Textual Criticism in the Study of Early Mormon Texts and History.” Intermountain West Journal of Religious Studies 10, no. 1 (2019): 55–85, https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/imwjournal/vol10/iss1/6/.
Abstract: Textual criticism tries by a variety of methods to understand the “original” or “best” wording of a document that may exist in multiple, conflicting versions or where the manuscripts are confusing or difficult to read. The present article, Part 1 of a two-part series by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw and Ryan Dahle, commends Colby Townsend’s efforts to raise awareness of the importance of textual criticism, while differing on some interpretations. Among the differences discussed is the question of whether it is better to read Moses 7:28 as it was dictated in Old Testament 1 version of the Joseph Smith Translation manuscript (OT1) that “God wept,” or rather to read it as it was later revised in the Old Testament 2 version (OT2) that “Enoch wept.” Far from being an obscure technical detail, the juxtaposition of the two versions of this verse raises general questions as to whether readings based on the latest revisions of Latter-day Saint scripture manuscripts should always take priority over the original dictations. A dialogue with Colby Townsend and Charles Harrell on rich issues of theological and historical relevance demonstrates the potential impact of the different answers to such questions by different scholars. In a separate discussion that highlights the potential significance of handwriting analysis to textual criticism, Bradshaw and Dahle respond to Townsend’s arguments that the spelling difference between the names Mahujah and Mahijah in the Book of Moses may be due to a transcription error.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
Book of Moses Topics > Literary and Textual Studies of the Book of Moses
ID = [3471]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-journal,moses  Size: 65485  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘That They May Be Purified in Me’: Ritual Purification in 3 Nephi 19 and the Implications of Holiness as ‘Purity’ for Latter-day Saint Temple Ordinances and Worship.” Paper presented at the 2020 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. November 7, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
ID = [6782]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-11-07  Collections:  bom,interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:51
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘That They Might Come Again unto the Remnant of the House of Jacob’: Onomastic Allusions to Joseph in 3 Nephi 26:8–10 and 4 Nephi 1:49.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 55 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 55 (2023): 279-296.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: The prophecies in 3 Nephi 26:8–10 and 4 Nephi 1:49 are third-generation members of the same family of texts derived from Isaiah 11:11–12 and Isaiah 29:4, all of which ultimately rely on yāsap (yôsîp or yôsip) idioms to describe the gathering of Israel and the concomitant coming forth of additional scripture. Mormon, following Nephi, apparently engages in a specific kind of wordplay on the name Joseph in 3 Nephi 26:8–10 and 4 Nephi 1:49 that ultimately harks back to the divine promises made to Joseph in Egypt (2 Nephi 25:21; see also especially 2 Nephi 3:4–16, Genesis 50:24–34 JST) and to his descendants. This wordplay looks forward to the name and role of the prophetic translator through whom additional scripture “[would] be brought again” and “[would] come again” in the last days.

Keywords: Abrahamic covenant; Book of Mormon; gathering of Israel; Joseph; wordplay
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 4 Nephi
ID = [81235]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 44297  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:12
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘That Which They Most Desired’: The Waters of Mormon, Baptism, the Love of God, and the Bitter Fountain.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 39 (2020): 261-298.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: Paronomasia in the Hebrew text of Exodus creates narrative links between the name Miriam (Mary) and the “waters” (mayim) of the Re[e]d Sea from which Israel is “pulled” and the nearby “bitter” waters of Marah. Nephi sees Mary (Mariam), the mother of Jesus, associated with the “love of God,” and thus to both “the tree of life” and “the fountain of living waters” (1 Nephi 11:25) vis-à-vis “the fountain of filthy water” (1 Nephi 12:16). Mormon was named after “the land of Mormon” (3 Nephi 5:12). He associates his given name with “waters,” which he describes as a “fountain of pure water” (Mosiah 18:5), and with the good “desires” and “love” that Alma the Elder’s converts manifest at the time of their baptism (Mosiah 18:8, 10‒11, 21, 28). Mormon’s accounts of the baptisms of Alma the Elder’s people, Limhi’s people, the people at Sidom (Alma 15:13), and a few repentant Nephites at Zarahemla who responded to Samuel the Lamanite’s preaching (Helaman 16:1), anticipate Jesus’s eventual reestablishment of the church originally founded by Alma, the baptism of his disciples, and their reception of the Holy Ghost — “that which they most desired” (see 3 Nephi 19:9‒14, 24). Desire serves as a key term that links all of these baptismal scenes. Mormon’s analogy of “the bitter fountain” and its “bitter water” vis-à-vis the “the good fount” and its “good water” — which helps set up his discussion of “the pure love of Christ,” which “endureth forever” (Moroni 7:47‒48) — should be understood against the backdrop of Lehi’s dream as Nephite “cultural narrative” and the history of Alma the Elder’s people at the waters of Mormon. As Mormon’s people lose the “love [which] endureth by faith unto prayer” (Moroni 8:26; see also Moroni 8:14‒17; 9:5) they become like the “bitter fountain” (Moroni 7:11) and do not endure to the end in faith, hope, and charity on the covenant path (cf. 2 Nephi 31:20; Moroni 7:40‒88; 8:24‒26). The name Mormon (“desire is enduring” or “love is enduring”), as borne by the prophet-editor of the Book of Mormon, embraces the whole cloud of these associations.

Keywords: baptism; bitter; Book of Mormon; desire; fountain; love; Mormon; paronomasia; water
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
Book of Mormon Topics > Literary and Textual Studies > Proper Names
Book of Mormon Topics > Literary and Textual Studies > Wordplay
ID = [3487]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 63180  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘Their Anger Did Increase Against Me’: Nephi’s Autobiographical Permutation of a Biblical Wordplay on the Name Joseph.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 23 (2017): 115-136.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Nephi’s record on the small plates includes seven distinct scenes in which Nephi depicts the anger of his brethren against him. Each of these scenes includes language that recalls Genesis 37:5‒10, 20, the biblical scene in which Joseph’s brothers “hate him yet the more [wayyôsipû ʿôd] for his dreams and for his words” because they fear that he intends to “reign” and to “have dominion” or rule over them (Genesis 37:8). Later, they plot to kill him (Genesis 37:20). Two of these “anger” scenes culminate in Nephi’s brothers’ bowing down before him in the same way that Joseph’s brothers bowed down in obeisance before him. Nephi permutes the expression wayyôsipû ʿôd in terms of his brothers’ “continuing” and “increasing” anger, which eventually ripens into a hatred that permanently divides the family. Nephi uses language that represents other yāsap/yôsîp + verbal-complement constructions in these “anger” scenes, usage that recalls the name Joseph in such a way as to link Nephi with his ancestor. The most surprising iteration of Nephi’s permuted “Joseph” wordplay occurs in his own psalm (2 Nephi 4:16‒35).

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
ID = [3712]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 54618  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘They Shall Be Joined unto Thee’” Paper presented at the 2018 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. November 10, 2018.
ID = [6900]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2018-11-10  Collections:  interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:52
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘They Shall Be Scattered Again’: Some Notes on JST Genesis 50:24–25, 33–35.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 57 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 57 (2023): 107-128.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: This article examines the extension of the etiological wordplay on the name Joseph (in terms of the Hebrew verbs ʾāsap and yāsap), recurrent in the canonical text of Genesis, into the JST Genesis 50 text, where Joseph learns about and prophesies of a future “Joseph” who would help gather Israel after they had been “scattered again” by the Lord. This article also analyzes the pairing of the prophetic and seeric roles of Moses and the latter-day “Joseph” at the beginning and ending of JST Genesis and explores the significance of this framing. The importance of Moses and Joseph Smith writing the word of the Lord in order to fulfill their prophetic responsibility to “gather” Israel emerges.

Keywords: Abrahamic covenant; gathering; Joseph; Joseph Smith Translation; Moses; scattering
ID = [81210]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal,jst  Size: 52454  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:11
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘They Shall No More Be Confounded’: Moroni’s Wordplay on Joseph in Ether 13:1-13 and Moroni 10:31.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 30 (2018): 91-104.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In two related prophecies, Moroni employs an apparent wordplay on the name Joseph in terms of the Hebrew idiom (lōʾ) yôsîp … ʿôd (+ verbal component), as preserved in the phrases “they shall no more be confounded” (Ether 13:8) and “that thou mayest no more be confounded” (Moroni 10:31). That phraseology enjoyed a long currency within Nephite prophecy (e.g., 1 Nephi 14:2, 15:20), ultimately having its source in Isaiah’s prophecies regarding Jerusalem/Zion (see, for example, Isaiah 51:22; 52:1– 2; 54:2–4). Ether and Moroni’s prophecy in Ether 13 that the Old Jerusalem and the New Jerusalem would “no more be confounded” further affirms the gathering of Israel in general and the gathering of the seed of Joseph in particular.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
Old Testament Scriptures > Isaiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [3609]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 32457  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘They Were Moved with Compassion’ (Alma 27:4; 53:13): Toponymic Wordplay on Zarahemla and Jershon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 18 (2016): 233-253.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: As in Hebrew biblical narrative, wordplay on (or play on the meaning of) toponyms, or “place names,” is a discernable feature of Book of Mormon narrative. The text repeatedly juxtaposes the toponym Jershon (“place of inheritance” or “place of possession”) with terms inherit, inheritance, possess, possession, etc. Similarly, the Mulekite personal name Zarahemla (“seed of compassion,” “seed of pity”), which becomes the paramount Nephite toponym as their national capital after the time of Mosiah I, is juxtaposed with the term compassion. Both wordplays occur and recur at crucial points in Nephite/Lamanite history. Moreover, both occur in connection with the migration of the first generation Lamanite converts. The Jershon wordplay recurs in the second generation, when the people of Ammon receive the Zoramite (re)converts into the land of Jershon, and wordplay on Zarahemla recurs subsequently, when the sons of these Lamanite converts come to the rescue of the Nephite nation. Rhetorical wordplay on Zarahemla also surfaces in important speeches later in the Book of Mormon.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
ID = [4408]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 54434  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:01
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘This Son Shall Comfort Us’: An Onomastic Tale of Two Noahs.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 23 (2017): 263-298.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: From an etiological perspective, the Hebrew Bible connects the name Noah with two distinct but somewhat homonymous verbal roots: nwḥ (“rest”) and nḥm (“comfort,” “regret” [sometimes “repent”]). Significantly, the Enoch and Noah material in the revealed text of the Joseph Smith Translation of Genesis (especially Moses 7–8) also connects the name Noah in a positive sense to the earth’s “rest” and the Lord’s covenant with Enoch after the latter “refuse[d] to be comforted” regarding the imminent destruction of humanity in the flood. The Book of Mormon, on the other hand, connects the name Noah pejoratively to Hebrew nwḥ (“rest”) and nḥm (“comfort” and “repentance” [regret]) in a negative evaluation of King Noah, the son of Zeniff. King Noah causes his people to “labor exceedingly to support iniquity” (Mosiah 11:6), gives “rest” to his wicked and corrupt priests (Mosiah 11:11), and anesthetizes his people in their sins with his winemaking. Noah and his people’s refusal to “repent” and their martyring of Abinadi result in their coming into hard bondage to the Lamanites. Mormon’s text further demonstrates how the Lord eventually “comforts” Noah’s former subjects after their “sore repentance” and “sincere repentance” from their iniquity and abominations, providing them a typological deliverance that points forward to the atonement of Jesus Christ.
“Sing, O heavens; and be joyful, O earth; and break forth into singing, O mountains: for the Lord hath comforted his people, and will have mercy upon his afflicted.” (Isaiah 49:13).

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Mosiah
Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 8 — Noah
ID = [3717]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,moses,old-test  Size: 63516  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Bowen, Matthew L., and Loren Blake Spendlove. “‘Thou Art the Fruit of My Loins’: The Interrelated Symbolism and Meanings of the Names Joseph and Ephraim in Ancient Scripture,.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 28 (2018): 273-298.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: To the ancient Israelite ear, the name Ephraim sounded like or connoted “doubly fruitful.” Joseph explains the naming of his son Ephraim in terms of the Lord’s having “caused [him] to be fruitful” (Genesis 41:52). The “fruitfulness” motif in the Joseph narrative cycle (Genesis 37–50) constitutes the culmination of a larger, overarching theme that begins in the creation narrative and is reiterated in the patriarchal narratives. “Fruitfulness,” especially as expressed in the collocation “fruit of [one’s] loins” dominates in the fuller version of Genesis 48 and 50 contained in the Joseph Smith Translation, a version of which Lehi and his successors had upon the brass plates. “Fruit” and “fruitfulness” as a play on the name Ephraim further serve to extend the symbolism and meaning of the name Joseph (“may he [God] add,” “may he increase”) and the etiological meanings given to his name in Genesis 30:23–24). The importance of the interrelated symbolism and meanings of the names Joseph and Ephraim for Book of Mormon writers, who themselves sought the blessings of divine fruitfulness (e.g., Lehi, Nephi, and Jacob), is evident in their use of the fuller version of the Joseph cycle (e.g., in Lehi’s parenesis to his son Joseph in 2 Nephi 3). It is further evident in their use of the prophecies of Isaiah and Zenos’s allegory of the olive tree, both of which utilize (divine) “fruitfulness” imagery in describing the apostasy and restoration of Israel (including the Northern Kingdom or “Ephraim”).

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Enos
Old Testament Scriptures > Isaiah
Old Testament Scriptures > Twelve Minor Prophets
ID = [3655]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 63193  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘Unto the Taking Away of Their Stumbling Blocks’: The Taking Away and Keeping Back of Plain and Precious Things and Their Restoration in 1 Nephi 13–15.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 53 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 53 (2022): 145-170.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: In the latter part (1 Nephi 13–14) of his vision of the tree of life (1 Nephi 11–14), Nephi is shown the unauthorized human diminution of scripture and the gospel by the Gentile “great and abominable church” — that plain and precious things/words, teachings, and covenants were “taken away” or otherwise “kept back” from the texts that became the Bible and how people lived out its teachings. He also saw how the Lord would act to restore those lost words, teachings, and covenants among the Gentiles “unto the taking away of their stumbling blocks” (1 Nephi 14:1). The iterative language of 1 Nephi 13 describing the “taking away” and “keeping back” of scripture bears a strong resemblance to the prohibitions of the Deuteronomic canon-formula texts (Deuteronomy 4:2; 12:31 [MT 13:1]). It also echoes the etiological meanings attached to the name Joseph in Genesis 30:23–24 in terms of “taking away” and “adding.” Nephi’s prophecies of scripture and gospel restoration on account of which “[the Gentiles] shall be no more [cf. Hebrew lōʾ yôsîpû … ʿôd] brought down into captivity, and the house of Israel shall no more [wĕlōʾ yôsîpû … ʿôd] be confounded” (1 Nephi 14:2) and “after that they were restored, they should no more be confounded [(wĕ)lōʾ yôsîpû … ʿôd], neither should they be scattered again [wĕlōʾ yôsîpû … ʿôd]” (1 Nephi 15:20) depend on the language of Isaiah. Like other Isaiah-based prophecies of Nephi (e.g., 2 Nephi 25:17, 21; 29:1–2), they echo the name of the prophet through whom lost scripture and gospel covenants would be restored — i.e., through a “Joseph.”

Keywords: apostasy; Book of Mormon; Canon; covenants; Joseph; keeping back; restoration; taking away; wordplay
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
ID = [81253]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 61085  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:12
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘Upon the Wings of His Spirit’: A Note on Hebrew rûaḥ and 2 Nephi 4:25.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 58 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 58 (2023): 19-32.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: Nephi, in composing his psalm (2 Nephi 4:15–35), incorporates a poetic idiom from Psalm 18:10 (2 Samuel 22:11) and Psalm 104:3 to describe his participation in a form of divine travel. This experience constituted a part of the vision in which he saw “the things which [his] father saw” in the latter’s dream of the tree of life (see 1 Nephi 11:1–3; 14:29–30). Nephi’s use of this idiom becomes readily apparent when the range of meaning for the Hebrew word rûaḥ is considered. Nephi’s experience helps our understanding of other scriptural scenes where similar divine travel is described.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; Nephi; polysemy; Spirit; wind
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
ID = [81197]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 31131  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:11
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘We Are a Remnant of the Seed of Joseph’: Moroni’s Interpretive Use of Joseph’s Coat and the Martial nēs-Imagery of Isaiah 11:11–12.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 41 (2020): 169-192.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Genesis 30:23–24 offers a double etiology for Joseph in terms of “taking away”/“gathering” (ʾāsap) and “adding” (yāsap). In addition to its later narratological use of the foregoing, the Joseph cycle (Genesis 37–50) evidences a third dimension of onomastic wordplay involving Joseph’s kĕtōnet passîm, an uncertain phrase traditionally translated “coat of many colours” (from LXX), but perhaps better translated, “coat of manifold pieces.” Moroni1, quoting from a longer version of the Joseph story from the brass plates, refers to “Joseph, whose coat was rent by his brethren into many pieces” (Alma 46:23). As a military and spiritual leader, Moroni1 twice uses Joseph’s torn coat and the remnant doctrine from Jacob’s prophecy regarding Joseph’s coat as a model for his covenant use of his own coat to “gather” (cf. ʾāsap) and rally faithful Nephites as “a remnant of the seed of Joseph” (Alma 46:12–28, 31; 62:4–6). In putting that coat on a “pole” or “standard” (Hebrew nēs — i.e., “ensign”) to “gather” a “remnant of the seed of Joseph” appears to make use of the Isaianic nēs-imagery of Isaiah 11:11–12 (and elsewhere), where the Joseph-connected verbs yāsap and ʾāsap serve as key terms. Moroni’s written-upon “standard” or “ensign” for “gathering” the “remnant of the seed of Joseph” constituted an important prophetic antetype for how Mormon and his son, Moroni2, perceived the function of their written record in the latter-days (see, e.g., 3 Nephi 5:23–26; Ether 13:1–13).

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 3 Nephi
Old Testament Scriptures > Isaiah
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
Book of Mormon Topics > Persons and Peoples > Joseph (Ancient Egypt)
Book of Mormon Topics > Doctrines and Teachings > Gather
ID = [3455]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 56239  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘We Might Have Enjoyed Our Possessions and the Land of Our Inheritance’: Hebrew yrš and 1 Nephi 17:21.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 50 (2022): 123-144.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: The verbal expression “we might have enjoyed,” as used in a complaint that Nephi attributes to his brothers, “we might have enjoyed our possessions and the land of our inheritance” (1 Nephi 17:21), reflects a use of the Hebrew verb yrš in its progressive aspect, “to enjoy possession of.” This meaning is evident in several passages in the Hebrew Bible, and perhaps most visibly in the KJV translation of Numbers 36:8 (“And every daughter, that possesseth [Hebrew yōrešet] an inheritance [naḥălâ] in any tribe of the children of Israel, shall be wife unto one of the family of the tribe of her father, that the children of Israel may enjoy [yîršû] every man the inheritance [naḥălat] of his fathers”) and Joshua 1:15 (“then ye shall return unto the land of your possession [lĕʾereṣ yĕruššatkem or, unto the land of your inheritance], and enjoy it [wîrištem ʾôtāh].” Examining Laman and Lemuel’s complaint in a legal context helps us better appreciate “land[s] of … inheritance” as not just describing a family estate, but as also expressing a seminal Abrahamic Covenant concept in numerous Book of Mormon passages, including the covenant implications of the resettlement of the converted Lamanites and reconverted Zoramites as refugees in “the land of Jershon” (“place of inheritance”).

Keywords: Abrahamic covenant; inherit; lands of inheritance; possess
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Old Testament Scriptures > Numbers
Old Testament Scriptures > Joshua
Old Testament Scriptures > Judges
Old Testament Scriptures > Psalms/Proverbs/Ecclesiastes/Song of Solomon
Old Testament Scriptures > Ezekiel
ID = [8441]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-00-00  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 54978  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:53:56
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘What Thank They the Jews’? (2 Nephi 29:4): A Note on the Name ‘Judah’ and Antisemitism.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 12 (2014): 111-125.
Display Abstract  

The Hebrew Bible explains the meaning of the personal and tribal name “Judah”—from which the term “Jews” derives—in terms of “praising” or “thanking” (*ydy/ydh). In other words, the “Jews” are those who are to be “praised out of a feeling of gratitude.” This has important implications for the Lord’s words to Nephi regarding Gentile ingratitude and antisemitism: “And what thank they the Jews for the Bible which they receive from them?” (2 Nephi 29:4). Gentile Christian antisemitism, like the concomitant doctrine of supersessionism, can be traced (in part) to widespread misunderstanding and misapplication of Paul’s words regarding Jews and “praise” (Romans 2:28-29). Moreover, the strongest scriptural warnings against antisemitism are to be found in the Book of Mormon, which also offers the reassurance that the Jews are still “mine ancient covenant people” (2 Nephi 29:4-5) and testifies of the Lord’s love and special concern for them.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 2 Nephi
ID = [4279]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2014-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 30998  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Dahle, Ryan, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Where Did the Names Mahaway and Mahujah Come From? A Response to Colby Townsend’s ‘Returning to the Sources,’ Part 2 of 2.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 40 (2020): 181-242.
Display Abstract  

Review of Colby Townsend, “Returning to the Sources: Integrating Textual Criticism in the Study of Early Mormon Texts and History,” Intermountain West Journal of Religious Studies 10, no. 1 (2019): 55–85, https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/imwjournal/vol10/iss1/6/.
Abstract: In the present article, Part 2 of 2 of a set of articles supporting Colby Townsend’s efforts to raise awareness of the importance of textual criticism, we focus on his argument that Joseph Smith created the Book of Moses names Mahijah and Mahujah after seeing a table of name variants in the Hebrew text of Genesis 4:18 in a Bible commentary written by Adam Clarke. While we are not averse in principle to the general possibility that Joseph Smith may have relied on study aids as part of his translation of the Bible, we discuss why in this case such a conjecture raises more questions than it answers. We argue that a common ancient source for Mahujah and Mahijah in the Book of Moses and similar names in the Bible and an ancient Dead Sea Scrolls Enoch text named the Book of Giants cannot be ruled out. More broadly, we reiterate and expand upon arguments we have made elsewhere that the short and fragmentary Book of Giants, a work not discovered until 1948, contains much more dense and generally more pertinent resemblances to Moses 6‒7 than the much longer 1 Enoch, the only ancient Enoch text outside the Bible that was published and translated into English in Joseph Smith’s lifetime.

Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
Book of Moses Topics > Literary and Textual Studies of the Book of Moses
ID = [4591]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-journal,moses  Size: 64661  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Bowen, Matthew L. “‘Where I Will Meet You’: The Convergence of Sacred Time and Sacred Space.” Paper presented at the 2016 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. November 5, 2016.
ID = [6894]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2016-11-05  Collections:  interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:51
Bowen, Matthew L. “You More than Owe Me This Benefit: Onomastic Rhetoric in Philemon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 17 (2016): 1-12.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Wordplay and punning involving the names Philemon (Φιλήμων, “affectionate one”) and Onesimus (Ὀνήσιμος, “useful”) and their meanings, with concomitant paronomasia involving the name-title Χριστός (Christos) and various homonymic terms, constitutes a key element in Paul’s polite, diplomatic, and carefully-worded letter to Philemon, the Christian owner of a converted slave named Onesimus. Paul artfully uses Philemon’s own name to play on the latter’s affections and to remind him that despite whatever Onesimus may owe (ὀφείλει, opheilei) Philemon, Philemon more than owes (προσοφείλεις, prosopheileis) his very self — i.e., his life as a Christian and thus his eternal wellbeing — to Paul. Hence, Philemon “more than owes” Paul his request to have Onesimus — who was once “useless” or “unprofitable” and “without Christ,” but is now “profitable” and “well-in-Christ” — as a fellow worker in the Gospel. In a further (polyptotonic) play on Onesimus, Paul expresses his urgent desire to “have the benefit” (ὀναίμην, onaimēn) of Onesimus in the Lord out of Philemon’s own free will and with his blessing, since all three are now brothers in Christ, and thus slaves to Christ, their true “master.” In the context of Paul’s use of –χρηστός (–chrēstos) and ὀναίμην (onaimēn), Paul’s desire for Philemon’s voluntary “good deed” or “benefit” (τὸ ἀγαθόν σου, to agathon sou) is to be understood as the granting of Onesimus and as the point and climax of this publicly-read letter.

ID = [4209]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 29800  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Boyce, Duane. “The Ammonites Were Not Pacifists.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 20 (2016): 293-313.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Although it is common to believe that the Ammonites were pacifists, the report of their story demonstrates that this is a mistake. Appreciating the Ammonites’ non-pacifism helps us think more clearly about them, and it also explains several features of the text. These are textual elements that surprise us if we assume that the Ammonites were pacifists, but that make perfect sense once we understand that they were not. Moreover, in addition to telling us that the Ammonites were not pacifists, the text also gives us the actual reason the Ammonites came to eschew all conflict — and we learn from this why significant prophetic leaders (from King Benjamin to Alma to Mormon) did not reject the sword in the same way. The text also reveals the intellectual flaw in supposing that the Ammonites’ early acts of self-sacrifice set the proper example for all disciples to follow.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
ID = [3752]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 53122  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Boyce, Duane. “‘Beloved by All the People’: A Fresh Look at Captain Moroni.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 45 (2021): 181-204.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In his well-known volume about the Book of Mormon, Grant Hardy focuses primarily on the book’s main narrators. However, he also makes a number of observations about other figures in the book that are of particular interest, including some about Captain Moroni. In addition to those I address elsewhere, these observations range from the assertion that Captain Moroni slaughtered his political opponents in one instance, to his claim that Moroni is not depicted as “particularly religious,” to his claim that Moroni had a “quick temper.” The question is: Are such observations supported in the text? Carefully examining this question both shows the answer to be “no” and allows a deeper look into Captain Moroni.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [3403]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 59754  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Boyce, Duane. “D&C 21, George Albert Smith, and Hugh B. Brown: A Fresh Look at Three Incidents in Church History.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 32 (2019): 229-252.
Display Abstract  

Abstract. When discussions arise about the relationship between Church members and the prophets who lead them, certain episodes in Church history often appear. These include the Lord’s words about “all patience and faith” in Doctrine and Covenants 21:4–5, as well as incidents involving George Albert Smith and Hugh B. Brown. On the surface, such episodes might seem to raise doubts about the reliability of the presiding Brethren in representing the Lord or to minimize the importance of Church orthodoxy itself. A closer look shows such interpretations to be a mistake, however. When we clarify the record, we see that these episodes do not support the conclusions that are sometimes drawn from them. Examining these incidents also permits making a point about so-called “blind obedience.”.

ID = [3580]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  d-c,interpreter-journal  Size: 55873  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Boyce, Duane. “Did Captain Moroni Lack the Typical Religious Virtues?” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 45 (2021): 217-240.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In his well-known volume about the Book of Mormon, Grant Hardy focuses primarily on the book’s main narrators. However, he also makes a number of observations about other figures in the book that are of particular interest, including some about Captain Moroni. In addition to those I address elsewhere, these observations include the claim that Moroni lacked the typical religious virtues — which Hardy identifies as “humility, self-sacrifice, kindness, and relying upon the Lord.” They also include the assertion that Helaman, in his manifest reliance upon God, serves as a counterexample to Moroni’s military leadership. A close look at the text, however, indicates that both these claims are mistaken.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Helaman
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Moroni
ID = [3405]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 64201  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Boyce, Duane. “‘In the Cause … of their God’: Clarifying Some Issues Regarding the Book of Mormon and a Gospel View of War.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 56 (2023): Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 56 (2023): 125-170.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Abstract: A recent effort to think about war concludes that the Book of Mormon displays two righteous approaches to conflict: a violent approach that is justified and therefore “blessed;” and a nonviolent approach that is higher than this and therefore “more blessed” (an approach that is also said to be effective in ending conflict). This effort, however, turns out to be unsuccessful for multiple reasons. Attending to these reasons can be valuable, since doing so can help clarify several important issues about the Book of Mormon and a gospel view of war.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; just-war ethics; nonviolent theology; war
ID = [81222]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 122754  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:12
Boyce, Duane. “Jacob Did Not Make a False Prediction.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 33 (2019): 161-174.
Display Abstract  

Review of Adam S. Miller, “Reading Signs or Repeating Symptoms,” in Christ and Antichrist: Reading Jacob 7, eds. Adam S. Miller and Joseph M. Spencer (Provo, Utah: Neal A. Maxwell Institute, 2017), 10 pages (chapter), 174 pages (book).

Abstract. The Neal A. Maxwell Institute recently published a volume on the encounter between Jacob and Sherem in Jacob 7. Adam Miller’s contribution to this book is a reiteration of views he published earlier in his own volume. One of Miller’s claims is that Jacob made a false prediction about the reaction Sherem would have to a sign if one were given him — an assertion that is already beginning to shape the conventional wisdom about this episode. This shaping is unfortunate, however, since the evidence indicates that this view of Jacob’s prediction is a mistake. Once we see this, it is easier to avoid other mistakes that seem evident in Miller’s approach.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Book of Mormon Scriptures > Alma
ID = [3563]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 32212  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Boyce, Duane. “A Lengthening Shadow: Is Quality of Thought Deteriorating in LDS Scholarly Discourse Regarding Prophets and Revelation? Part One.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 26 (2017): 1-48.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Many mistakes that occur in scholarly endeavors are understandable. The truth is often difficult to discover, and this makes errors inevitable and expected. And, of course, some mistakes are so insignificant that to complain of them would be mere pedantry. But this is not true of all errors. Some are both obvious and of such significance to their topics that they are egregious. With respect to the gospel, there is reason to be concerned that this is occurring to some degree on the topic of prophets and the Lord’s revelations to them. Erroneous claims and arguments are not difficult to find, including some published under the auspices of reputable and mainstream entities. Is it possible that such errors are becoming common, and commonly accepted, in Latter-day Saint scholarly discourse? To help answer this question, it is useful to consider, among others, works by Terryl Givens, Patrick Mason, and Grant Hardy. This paper will do so in three Parts.

ID = [3677]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 64440  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Boyce, Duane. “A Lengthening Shadow: Is Quality of Thought Deteriorating in LDS Scholarly Discourse Regarding Prophets and Revelation? Part Three.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 26 (2017): 93-122.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Many mistakes that occur in scholarly endeavors are understandable. The truth is often difficult to discover, and this makes errors inevitable and expected. And, of course, some mistakes are so insignificant that to complain of them would be mere pedantry. But this is not true of all errors. Some are both obvious and of such significance to their topics that they are egregious. With respect to the gospel, there is reason to be concerned that this is occurring to some degree on the topic of prophets and the Lord’s revelations to them. Erroneous claims and arguments are not difficult to find, including some published under the auspices of reputable and mainstream entities. Is it possible that such errors are becoming common, and commonly accepted, in Latter-day Saint scholarly discourse? Part One considered multiple examples, primarily from Terryl Givens and Patrick Mason, that begin to suggest a positive answer to this question, and Part Two did the same with regard to examples from Grant Hardy. This Part considers several additional instances that can be treated more briefly and then provides a general conclusion to the two-part question that has guided this exploration.

ID = [3679]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 64534  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Boyce, Duane. “A Lengthening Shadow: Is Quality of Thought Deteriorating in LDS Scholarly Discourse Regarding Prophets and Revelation? Part Two.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 26 (2017): 49-92.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Many mistakes that occur in scholarly endeavors are understandable. The truth is often difficult to discover, and this makes errors inevitable and expected. And of course, some mistakes are so insignificant that to complain of them would be mere pedantry. But this is not true of all errors. Some are both obvious and of such significance to their topics that they are egregious. There is reason to be concerned that this is occurring to some degree on the topic of prophets and the Lord’s revelations to them. Erroneous claims and arguments are not difficult to find, including some published under the auspices of reputable and mainstream entities. Is it possible that such errors are becoming common, and commonly accepted, in LDS scholarly discourse? Part One considered multiple examples, primarily from Terryl Givens and Patrick Mason, that begin to suggest a positive answer to this question. This installment, Part Two, considers examples from Grant Hardy that also suggest an affirmative answer.

ID = [3678]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 63954  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Boyce, Duane. “Reclaiming Jacob.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 22 (2016): 107-129.
Display Abstract  

Abstract. A chapter of Adam Miller’s Future Mormon concerns Jacob’s encounter with Sherem in Jacob 7. While novel, Miller’s treatment of Jacob and Sherem appears inadequate. He overlooks features of the text that seem to subvert his unconventional conclusions about them. This essay identifies a number of such matters, falling in four major categories, and shares thoughts on the need for perspective when discussing Jacob’s conduct — or the conduct of any prophet, for that matter. It also highlights the jeopardy we face of being the second group to fall for Sherem’s lies.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
ID = [3724]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 57562  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Boyce, Duane. “Sustaining the Brethren.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 14 (2015): vii-xxxii.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Believing Latter-day Saints hold different views about what it means to sustain the presiding Brethren of the Church. In this article, I outline some considerations that might be kept in mind as members of the Church evaluate their views on this vital topic and the Lord’s admonition to sustain the Brethren by their faith, prayers, and actions.

ID = [4250]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 64580  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:59
Boyce, Duane. “Text as Afterthought: Jana Riess’s Treatment of the Jacob-Sherem Episode.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 33 (2019): 123-140.
Display Abstract  

Review of Jana Riess, “‘There Came a Man’: Sherem, Scapegoating, and the Inversion of Prophetic Tradition,” in Christ and Antichrist: Reading Jacob 7, eds. Adam S. Miller and Joseph M. Spencer (Provo, Utah: Neal A. Maxwell Institute, 2017), 17 pages (chapter), 174 pages (book).
Abstract: The Neal A. Maxwell Institute recently published a book on the encounter between Jacob and Sherem in Jacob 7. Jana Riess’s contribution to this volume demonstrates the kind of question-asking and hypothesis formation that might occur on a quick first pass through the text, but it does not demonstrate what obviously must come next, the testing of those hypotheses against the text. Her article appears to treat the text as a mere afterthought. The result is a sizeable collection of errors in thinking about Jacob and Sherem.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Jacob
Old Testament Scriptures > 1 & 2 Samuel
Old Testament Scriptures > 1 & 2 Kings/1 & 2 Chronicles
ID = [3561]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 45632  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Boyce, Duane. “‘Yes, It’s True, But I Don’t Think They Like to Hear it Quite That Way’: What Spencer W. Kimball Told Elaine Cannon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 32 (2019): 277-286.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Elaine Cannon, who was general president of the Young Women some four decades ago, had an interesting conversation with President Spencer W. Kimball in 1978. According to Sister Cannon’s firsthand account, President Kimball revealed important insight into how he thought about himself as the prophet as well as how he thought leaders should talk to the general membership about that topic. Sister Cannon’s report is thus a valuable part of the historical record regarding both Spencer W. Kimball and prophets generally.

ID = [3582]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 19384  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Boylan, Robert S. “Book Review: Forgery and Counterforgery: The Use of Literary Deceit in Early Christian Polemics, by Bart D. Ehrman.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 3 (2013): 115-118.
Display Abstract  

Review of Bart D. Ehrman. Forgery and Counterforgery: The Use of Literary Deceit in Early Christian Polemics. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012). x + 628 pp, including bibliography and index. $39.95. Hardback.

ID = [4372]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2013-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 7147  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Boylan, Robert S. “Two Notes on the Language Used in the Last Supper Accounts.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 28 (2018): 171-176.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The institution of the Lord’s Supper is recounted explicitly in four New Testament texts (Matthew 26:26–29; Mark 14:22–25; Luke 22:19–20; 1 Corinthians 11:23–26). Common to all these texts is the phrase “this is my body,” and in the Lukan and Pauline texts, the command to “do this in remembrance of me.” In this paper, I will examine both the grammatical and theological implications of “this is my body” and the concept of “remembrance” in the theology of the Last Supper — with how Latter-day Saints can appropriate such in their weekly observance of this sacred ordinance.

.

ID = [3649]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  interpreter-journal  Size: 12181  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:58
Bradley, Don. “A Passover Setting for Lehi’s Exodus.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 34 (2020): 119-142.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Later in his life, former Palmyra resident Fayette Lapham recounted with sharp detail an 1830 interview he conducted with Joseph Smith Sr. about the coming forth of the Book of Mormon. Among the details he reports that Lehi’s exodus from Jerusalem occurred during a “great feast.” This detail, not found in the published Book of Mormon, may reveal some of what Joseph Sr. knew from the lost 116 pages. By examining the small plates account of this narrative in 1 Nephi 1−5, we see not only that such a feast was possible, but that Lehi’s exodus and Nephi’s quest for the brass plates occurred at Passover. This Passover setting helps explain why Nephi killed Laban and other distinctive features of Lehi’s exodus. Read in its Passover context, the story of Lehi is not just the story of one man’s deliverance, but of the deliverance of humankind by the Lamb of God. The Passover setting in which it begins illuminates the meaning of the Book of Mormon as a whole.
[Editor’s Note: This article is an excerpt from Chapter 7 of the author’s new book, The Lost 116 Pages: Reconstructing the Book of Mormon’s Lost Stories (Salt Lake City: Kofford Books, 2019).].

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Mormon Topics > General Topics > Passover
ID = [3548]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 57161  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:57
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “‘Abound in Hope’ — Stories of the Saints in the DR Congo, Part 6.” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 8, 2018.
ID = [4875]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2018-10-08  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website  Size: 12617  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:04
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., and David J. Larsen. “Ancient Affinities within the LDS Book of Enoch Part One.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 4 (2013): 1-27.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In this article, we will examine affinities between ancient extracanonical sources and a collection of modern revelations that Joseph Smith termed “extracts from the Prophecy of Enoch.” We build on the work of previous scholars, revisiting their findings with the benefit of subsequent scholarship. Following a perspective on the LDS canon and an introduction to the LDS Enoch revelations, we will focus on relevant passages in pseudepigrapha and LDS scripture within three episodes in the Mormon Enoch narrative: Enoch’s prophetic commission, Enoch’s encounters with the “gibborim,” and the weeping and exaltation of Enoch and his people.

Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4356]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2013-01-01  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-journal  Size: 60779  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., and David J. Larsen. “Ancient Affinities within the LDS Book of Enoch Part Two.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 4 (2013): 29-74.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In this article, we will examine affinities between ancient extracanonical sources and a collection of modern revelations that Joseph Smith termed “extracts from the Prophecy of Enoch.” We build on the work of previous scholars, revisiting their findings with the benefit of subsequent scholarship. Following a perspective on the LDS canon and an introduction to the LDS Enoch revelations, we will focus on relevant passages in pseudepigrapha and LDS scripture within three episodes in the Mormon Enoch narrative: Enoch’s prophetic commission, Enoch’s encounters with the “gibborim,” and the weeping and exaltation of Enoch and his people.

Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4357]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2013-01-01  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-journal,moses  Size: 64071  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:00
Brown, Matthew B., Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Stephen D. Ricks, and John S. Thompson, eds. Ancient Temple Worship: Proceedings of the Expound Symposium, 14 May 2011. Temple on Mount Zion 1. Orem and Salt Lake City, UT: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2014.
Display Abstract  

The first volume in a series by Eborn Books and The Interpreter Foundation. The second title in this series is TEMPLE INSIGHTS. The Interpreter Foundation is a new organization, much like FARMS [The Foundation of Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.] Contributors and Chapters: 1. Cube, Gate and Measuring Tools: A Biblical Pattern, by Matthew B. Brown. 2. The Tabernacle: Mountain of God in the Cultus of Israel, by L. Michael Morales. 3. Standing in the Holy Place: Ancient and Modern Reverberations, by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. 4. Understanding Ritual Hand Gestures of the Ancient World, by David Calabro. 5. The Sacred Embrace and the Sacred Handclasp, by Stephen D. Ricks. 6. Ascending into the Hill of the Lord: What the Psalms Can Tell Us, by David J. Larsen. 7. The Sod of YHWH and the Endowment, by William J. Hamblin. 8. Temples All the Way Down: Notes on the Mi\'raj of Muhammad, by Daniel C. Peterson. 9. The Lady at the Horizon: Egyptian Tree Goddess Iconography, by John S. Thompson. 10. Nephite Daykeepers: Ritual Specialists in Mesoamerica, by Mark Alan Wright. 11. Is Decrypting the Genetic Legacy of America\'s Indigenous Populations Key to the Historicity of the Book of Mormon? by Ugo A. Perego and Jayne E. Ekins.

ID = [6735]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2014-01-01  Collections:  bom,bradshaw,interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:50
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “The Ark and the Tent: Temple Symbolism in the Story of Noah.” Paper presented at the 2012 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. September 22, 2012.
ID = [6848]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2012-09-22  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:51
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “The Ark and the Tent: Temple Symbolism in the Story of Noah.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 44 (2021): 93-136.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Jeffrey M. Bradshaw compares Moses’ tabernacle and Noah’s ark, and then identifies the story of Noah as a temple related drama, drawing of temple mysticism and symbols. After examining structural similarities between ark and tabernacle and bringing into the discussion further information about the Mesopotamian flood story, he shows how Noah’s ark is a beginning of a new creation, pointing out the central point of Day One in the Noah story. When Noah leaves the ark, they find themselves in a garden, not unlike the Garden of Eden in the way the Bible speaks about it. A covenant is established in signs and tokens. Noah is the new Adam. This is then followed by a fall/Judgement scene story, even though it is Ham who is judged, not Noah. In accordance with mostly non-Mormon sources quoted, Bradshaw points out how Noah was not in “his” tent, but in the tent of the Shekhina, the presence of God, how being drunk was seen by the ancients as a synonym to “being caught up in a vision of God,” and how his “nakedness” was rather referring to garments God had made for Adam and Eve.
[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.
See Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, “The Ark and the Tent: Temple Symbolism in the Story of Noah,” in Temple Insights: Proceedings of the Interpreter Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference, “The Temple on Mount Zion,” 22 September 2012, ed. William J. Hamblin and David Rolph Seely (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2014), 25–66. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/temple-insights/.].

Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Old Testament Scriptures > Exodus
Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 8 — Noah
Book of Moses Topics > Temple Themes in the Book of Moses and Related Scripture
Book of Moses Topics > Selection of Ancient Sources > Noah
ID = [3416]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-journal,moses,old-test  Size: 64300  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:56
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “Beauty and Truth in Moses 1.” Paper presented at the 2018 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. November 10, 2018.
ID = [6901]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2018-11-10  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:52
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “‘The Book Nobody Wants’: Hugh Nibley and the Book of Mormon.” In Hugh Nibley Observed Introductory Blog Series, by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR. 8 April 2021.
Display Abstract  

This is the second of eight weekly blog posts published in honor of the life and work of Hugh Nibley.
Hugh Nibley ironically called the Book of Mormon “the Book Nobody Wants,” since many people act like it’s being forced on them. This article attempts to answer the question, “What did Nibley mean by the Book Nobody Wants?”

Topics:    Hugh W. Nibley Topics > Hugh Nibley > Scholarship, Footnotes, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, CWHN, Editing > Book of Mormon
ID = [1934]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2021-04-01  Collections:  bom,bradshaw,interpreter-website,nibley  Size: 14560  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:44
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “The Book of Moses as a Temple Text.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 49 (2021): 63-112.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In this fascinating article, Jeff Bradshaw details how the Book of Moses might be understood as a temple text, including elements of temple architecture, furnishings, and ritual in the story of the Creation and the Fall. Bradshaw shows how the second half of the Book of Moses follows a general pattern of a specific sequence of covenants that will resonate with members of the Church who have received the temple endowment. The story of Enoch and his people provides a vivid demonstration of the final steps on the path that leads back to God and exaltation.

ID = [6497]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-journal  Size: 64344  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:51:48
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “The Book of Moses as a Temple Text.” In Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, Volume 1. Edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon, 421–68. Orem, UT; Springville, UT; Redding, CA; Tooele, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, and Eborn Books, 2021.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Temple Themes in the Book of Moses and Related Scripture
ID = [4644]  Status = Type = book chapter  Date = 2021-08-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:03
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #1: Enoch’s Prophetic Commission (Moses 6:26–36) — Introduction.” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 02, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4589]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 25856  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #2: Enoch’s Prophetic Commission — The Opening of Enoch’s Mouth and Eyes (Moses 6:31–32, 35).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 09, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4587]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 18916  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #3: Enoch’s Prophetic Commission — Enoch As a Lad (Moses 6:31).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 16, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4586]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 16253  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #4: Enoch’s Prophetic Commission — Enoch’s Power Over the Elements and His Divine Protection (Moses 6:32, 34).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 23, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4585]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 34035  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #5: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Were Ancient Enoch Manuscripts the Inspiration for Moses 6–7? (Moses 6–7).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. May 30, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4584]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 47191  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #6: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Enoch and the Other ‘Wild Man’ (Moses 6:38).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 06, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4583]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 48002  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #7: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Could Joseph Smith Have Borrowed ‘Mahijah/Mahujah’ from the Book of Giants? (Moses 6:40).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 13, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4582]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 48609  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #8: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Mahijah and Mahaway Interrogate Enoch (Moses 6:40).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 20, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4581]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 21423  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #9: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Secret Works, Oaths, and Murders (Moses 6:15).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. June 27, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4580]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 19741  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #10: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Enoch Reads from a Book of Remembrance (Moses 6:46–47).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 04, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4579]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 16264  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #11: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Enoch’s Call Raises the Possibility of Repentance (Moses 6:47, 50–68).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 11, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4578]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 16371  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #12: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — The Defeat of the Gibborim and the Roar of the Wild Beasts (Moses 7:13).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 18, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4577]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 26996  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #13: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Imprisonment of the Gibborim (Moses 7:38).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. July 25, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4576]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 40396  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #14: The Teachings of Enoch — Enoch as a Teacher (Moses 6:51–68).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 01, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4575]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 40859  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #15: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘The Son of Man, Even Jesus Christ, a Righteous Judge’ (Moses 6:57).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 08, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4574]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 47872  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #16: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By Water, and Blood, and the Spirit’ (Moses 6:58–60).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 15, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4573]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 28271  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #17: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By the Water Ye Keep the Commandment’ (Moses 6:60, 64).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 22, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4572]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 23290  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #18: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘Out of the Waters of Judah’ (1 Nephi 20:1; JST Genesis 17:3–7).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. August 29, 2020.
Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4571]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bom,bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses,old-test  Size: 30134  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #19: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By the Spirit Ye Are Justified’ (Moses 6:60, 63, 65–66).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 05, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4570]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 29035  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #20: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘By the Blood Ye Are Sanctified’ (Moses 6:60).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 12, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4569]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 40440  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, and Matthew L. Bowen. “Essay #21: The Teachings of Enoch — ‘Thus May All Become My Sons’ (Moses 6:59, 66–68).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 19, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4568]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 31504  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #22: Enoch the Prophet and Seer — Enoch’s Transfiguration (Moses 7:1–3).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. September 26, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4567]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 36131  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #23: Enoch the Prophet and Seer — Enoch’s Prophecy of the Tribes (Moses 7:5–11, 22).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 03, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4566]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 28053  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #24: Enoch, the Prophet and Seer: The End of the Wicked and the Beginnings of Zion (Moses 7:12–18).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 10, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4565]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 62460  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #25: Enoch’s Grand Vision: A Chorus of Weeping (Moses 7:18–49).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 17, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4564]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 43161  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #26: Enoch’s Grand Vision: The Complaining Voice of the Earth (Moses 7:48–49, 54, 61, 64).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 24, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4563]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 13809  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #27: Enoch’s Grand Vision: The Weeping Voice of the Heavens (Moses 7:28–29, 40, 42–43).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. October 31, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4562]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 18662  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Jacob A. Rennaker, and David J. Larsen. “Essay #28: Enoch’s Grand Vision: The Weeping of Enoch (Moses 7:28–43).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. November 07, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4561]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 47378  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #29: Enoch’s Grand Vision: The Earth Shall Rest (Moses 7:60–69).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. November 14, 2020.
Topics:    Book of Moses Topics > Chapters of the Book of Moses > Moses 6:13–7 — Enoch
ID = [4560]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-05-02  Collections:  bradshaw,interpreter-website,moses  Size: 28585  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:52:02
Book of Mormon Central, and Jeffrey M. Bradshaw. “Essay #30: Enoch’s Grand Vision: God Receives Zion unto Himself (Moses 7:18–19, 68–69).” In Pearl of Great Price Central; The Interpreter Foundation. November 21, 2020.