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Book of Moses Essays
Enoch's Preaching Mission (Moses 6-7)
Essays #5 - #13

Essay #13: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Imprisonment of the Gibborim (Moses 7:38)

The conclusion of the story of the rebellion of the Watchers in 1 Enoch is their terrible binding and eternal imprisonment: "Go, Michael, bind Shemihazah and the others with him, … bind them … in the valleys of the earth, until the day of their judgment. … Then they will be led away to the fiery abyss, and to the torture, and to the prison where they will be confined forever....

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Essay #11: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Enoch’s Call Raises the Possibility of Repentance (Moses 6:47, 50–68)

As Hugh Nibley was finishing the concluding, August 1977 article in his long-running series on ancient Enoch manuscripts and Moses 6–7 for the Ensign magazine, he received—“just in time” —the anxiously awaited English translation of the fragments of Aramaic books of Enoch from cave 4 at Qumran. ...

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Essay #7: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Could Joseph Smith Have Borrowed “Mahijah/Mahujah” from the Book of Giants? (Moses 6:40)

As Hugh Nibley was finishing the concluding, August 1977 article in his long-running series on ancient Enoch manuscripts and Moses 6–7 for the Ensign magazine, he received—“just in time” —the anxiously awaited English translation of the fragments of Aramaic books of Enoch from cave 4 at Qumran. ...

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Essay #5: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Were Ancient Enoch Manuscripts the Inspiration for Moses 6–7? (Moses 6–7)

In this Essay, we will introduce the most well-known ancient Enoch manuscripts and review the possibility that Joseph Smith could have derived the Enoch accounts in Moses 6–7 from any of them. Pioneering insights on the relationship between ancient Enoch manuscripts and the Book of Moses can be found in the writings of Hugh W. Nibley, who wrote a series of articles on the subject for the Ensign magazine in 1975–1977. ...

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Essay #12: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — The Defeat of the Gibborim and the Roar of the Wild Beasts (Moses 7:13)

A previous Insight described how the gibborim sorrowed and trembled after Enoch read their wicked deeds out of the book of remembrance and tendered the possibility of repentance. Drawing jointly on the Manichaean and Qumran accounts, Matthew Goff conjectures that the Book of Giants follows a set of Jewish traditions where at least some of the nephilim and gibborim “are not killed in a flood but rather have long lives.”...

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Essay #10: Enoch’s Preaching Mission — Enoch Reads from a Book of Remembrance (Moses 6:46–47)

As Hugh Nibley was finishing the concluding, August 1977 article in his long-running series on ancient Enoch manuscripts and Moses 6–7 for the Ensign magazine, he received—“just in time” —the anxiously awaited English translation of the fragments of Aramaic books of Enoch from cave 4 at Qumran. ...

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