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A

Adams, Linda Hunter. “Role Models.” Latter-day Digest 2, no. 4 (1993): 3–12.

Linda Hunter Adams expressed gratitude for Nibley’s article.

Anderson, Richard Lloyd. “Foreword to the 1967 Edition.” In Since Cumorah: The Book of Mormon in the Modern World, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 7, 2nd ed. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 1988.

A hundred years ago, the Book of Mormon was regarded by the scholarly world as an odd text that simply did not fit their understanding of the ancient world. Since that time, however, numerous ancient records have come to light, including the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Nag Hammadi texts. These discoveries have forced scholars to change their views of history, and they place the Book of Mormon in a new light as well. That is why respected Latter-day Saint scholar Hugh Nibley wrote Since Cumorah, a brilliant literary, theological, and historical evaluation of the Book of Mormon as an ancient book.

Anderson, Richard Lloyd. “Religious Validity: The Sacrament Covenant in Third Nephi.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

A study of how history is typically written and the similarities with how the Book of Mormon is written.

Arnold, Marilyn. “Words words words: Hugh Nibley on the Book of Mormon.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture 19, no. 2 (2010): 4–21.

On 25 March 2010, in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium, Brigham Young University, Marilyn Arnold presented this lecture as part of a series honoring Hugh W. Nibley on the 100th anniversary of his birth (27 March 2010).

In this lecture commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of Hugh Nibley’s birth, Arnold paints a picture of him by discussing not only his scholarship but also his very unique, and often humorous, writing and speaking styles and his consistent jabs at academia. According to Arnold, who read everything Nibley had written on the Book of Mormon, Nibley was never more eloquent or serious than when he defended that book. Often, Arnold notes, his defenses and other writings are illuminated by literary devices, including the use of parable, epistle, and Platonic dialogue.

Arnold, Marilyn. “‘Words, Words, Words’: Hugh Nibley on the Book of Mormon.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

On 25 March 2010, in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium, Brigham Young University, Marilyn Arnold presented this lecture as part of a series honoring Hugh W. Nibley on the 100th anniversary of his birth (27 March 2010).

In this lecture commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of Hugh Nibley’s birth, Arnold paints a picture of him by discussing not only his scholarship but also his very unique, and often humorous, writing and speaking styles and his consistent jabs at academia. According to Arnold, who read everything Nibley had written on the Book of Mormon, Nibley was never more eloquent or serious than when he defended that book. Often, Arnold notes, his defenses and other writings are illuminated by literary devices, including the use of parable, epistle, and Platonic dialogue.

Atiya, Aziz S. “The Copts and the Bible.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

A look at the historical significances of the Copts (an ancient Egyptian/Sudanese ethnic group) in regards to the Bible.

B

Ball, Terry B. “Nibley and the Environment.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture 20, no. 2 (2011): 16–29.

Hugh Nibley cared deeply about creation and was passionate about our stewardship over the earth. His arguments in defense of the environment were informed by the disciplines he knew best: history, philosophy, and theology. From his study, research, and reasoning, Nibley drew several principles that seem to have directed his thoughts and crafted his sense of environmental stewardship. Four of these principles are discussed in this paper: (1) humankind has a divine mandate to properly care for creation; (2) humankind’s spiritual health and environmental heath are linked; (3) creation obeys, reverences, and provides for humankind, as humankind righteously cares for creation; and (4) humankind should not sacrifice environmental health for temporal wealth.

A review of Hugh Nibley’s thoughts and writings on the environment.

Ball, Terry B. “Nibley and the Environment.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh W. Nibley (1910–2005) was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century, with wide-ranging interests in scripture, history, and social issues. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley comprise nineteen weighty volumes. But he was also one of the most enigmatic observers of the Church. In this volume readers will discover that the personal stories and perspectives behind the scholarship are sometimes even more captivating than his brilliant and witty intellectual breakthroughs. This comprehensive three-part collection of essays sheds fascinating new light on Hugh Nibley as a scholar and a man. Part 1, entitled “Portraits,” contains the first collection of observations—a “spiritual” portrait of Hugh Nibley by his close friend and colleague John W. “Jack” Welch, a description of the physical portrait by Rebecca Everett hanging in the Hugh Nibley Ancient Studies room at Brigham Young University, and a biographical portrait by Hugh himself. Part 2, “Nibley, the Scholar,” contains expanded and updated versions of the almost forgotten audio and video recordings of the BYU Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship lecture series celebrating the centennial of Nibley’s birth in 2010. An additional set of chapters on Nibley’s scholarship rounds out this collection. Part 3, “Nibley, the Man,” includes tributes given by family members and others at Nibley’s funeral service. A series of entertaining personal stories, reminiscences, and folklore accounts concludes the volume.

A review of Hugh Nibley’s thoughts and writings on the environment.

Barney, Kevin L. Review of One Eternal Round, by Hugh Nibley and Michael D. Rhodes. By Common Consent, 21 March 2010.
Benson, Lee. “Mormondom Mourns Unique Man of Letters.” Deseret News, 28 February 2005.

The Deseret News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.

An overview of Hugh Nibley’s life as a tribute after his death.

McKinlay, Daniel B., Hugh W. Nibley, and Steven W. Booras. “The Dead Sea Scrolls: Select Publications by Latter-day Saint Scholars.” Studies in the Bible and Antiquity 2 no. 1 (2010).

Select bibliography of LDS research on the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Boyce, Duane. “Do Liberal Economic Policies Approximate the Law of Consecration?” The FARMS Review 21, no. 1 (2009): Article 15.

Also available for free at BYU ScholarsArchive.

A review of Approaching Zion, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 9.

Bradford, Mary Lythgoe. “A Reader's Library: Hugh Nibley: A Legend in His Own Time.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 12, no. 1 (2003): 108–110, 120.

This review enthusiastically endorses Boyd Petersen’s biography of his father-in-law, Hugh Nibley. Petersen intersperses narrative chapters with thematic ones in Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life.

Brady, Jane D. “The Legend of Hugh Nibley.” For publication in Brigham Young Magazine, n.d. See Hugh Nibley Collection or Boyd Jay Petersen box 21, folder 11.
Brady, Jane D. “The BYU Folklore of Hugh Nibley.” In Colloquium Essays in Literature and Belief, 515–28. Provo, UT: Center for the Study of Christian Values in Literature, 2001.

Republished as “The BYU Folklore of Hugh W. Nibley“ in Hugh Nibley Observed.

How Hugh Nibley became a household name and a legend at Brigham Young University.

Brady, Jane D. “The BYU Folklore of Hugh W. Nibley.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Originally published as “The BYU Folklore of Hugh Nibley“ in Colloquial Essays in Literature and Belief.

How Hugh Nibley became a household name and a legend at Brigham Young University.

Brown, S. Kent. “The Seventy in Scripture.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

Asks the questions Why the number seventy and why to Gentiles? It then suggests that the key to both questions lies in the catalog of the descendants of Noah in Genesis 10.

Brown, S. Kent. “Enoch, the Book of Moses, and the Book of Giants: More Light on the 1977 Visit of Professor Matthew Black to BYU.” In Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR Blog Posts, May 17, 2021.

A discussion of remarks given at Brigham Young University by Professor Matthew Black and his wife, Ethel.

Brueck, Sara. “Nibley Celebrates 90th Birthday.” Daily Universe, 27 March 2000.

The Daily Universe is an educational lab tied to the curriculum of the journalism sequence in the BYU School of Communications and is committed to the mission of BYU and its sponsoring institution, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

An overview of Hugh Nibley’s accomplishments as tribute for his ninetieth birthday.

Burns, Mark. “Late Night: Starring Hugh Nibley.” Student Review, 27 September 1989, 4.
Bushman, Richard Lyman. “The Lamanite View of Book of Mormon History.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

There are enough clues scattered through the Nephite record to offer a few conjectures about a Lamanite history of Lehi’s descendants.

Bushman, Richard Lyman. “Hugh Nibley and Joseph Smith.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture 19, no. 1, (2010): 4–13.

Reprinted in Hugh Nibley Observed.

Just as attorneys representing the church wouldn’t bear their testimonies in a courtroom, Hugh Nibley defended Joseph Smith through facts and scholarly dialogue, not testimony bearing. Although Nibley did, at times, discuss the Prophet specifically, his defense of Joseph came primarily through academic vindication of the Book of Mormon. When others made scholarly attacks against Joseph’s character, Nibley would move the debate to a discussion of the historicity of the book on its own terms. When Nibley did directly discuss the Prophet, he portrayed him as a humble, loving servant of God.

Bushman, Richard Lyman. “Hugh Nibley and Joseph Smith.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Originally published in the Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture (2010).

Just as attorneys representing the church wouldn’t bear their testimonies in a courtroom, Hugh Nibley defended Joseph Smith through facts and scholarly dialogue, not testimony bearing. Although Nibley did, at times, discuss the Prophet specifically, his defense of Joseph came primarily through academic vindication of the Book of Mormon. When others made scholarly attacks against Joseph’s character, Nibley would move the debate to a discussion of the historicity of the book on its own terms. When Nibley did directly discuss the Prophet, he portrayed him as a humble, loving servant of God.

C

Capener, Brian. “The Faith of an Observer: Conversations with Hugh Nibley.” Coproduced by Brigham Young University and the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1985.

Remastered with English subtitles. Excerpted version.

Who was Hugh Nibley? For starters, he was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century. Though he was sometimes one of the harshest critics of Brigham Young University, he was also one of the Church’s most faithful and loyal advocates. People liked Hugh Nibley because he was not afraid to say things that we wish we could say, to espouse unpopular causes, to thumb his nose at fashion, or to buck the crowd. According to Elder Neal A. Maxwell, Nibley’s well-known eccentricity was itself “a reflection of his deepened discipleship.”

Capener, Brian. “Faith of an Observer: Conversations with Hugh Nibley (complete version, subtitled).” 2021.

Remastered with English subtitles. Complete version.

Who was Hugh Nibley? For starters, he was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century. Though he was sometimes one of the harshest critics of Brigham Young University, he was also one of the Church’s most faithful and loyal advocates. People liked Hugh Nibley because he was not afraid to say things that we wish we could say, to espouse unpopular causes, to thumb his nose at fashion, or to buck the crowd. According to Elder Neal A. Maxwell, Nibley’s well-known eccentricity was itself “a reflection of his deepened discipleship.”

Card, Orson Scott. “How Hugh Nibley Blessed the Church.” Meridian Magazine, 25 February 2005. https://latterdaysaintmag.com/article-1-5327/.

An article written the day after Hugh Nibley’s death, in memoriam.

Card, Orson Scott. “Nibley Explains Gospel Best.” Mormon Times, 19 February 2009.

Mormon Times is for and about members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

“A comparison between C. S. Lewis and Hugh Nibley to show that, between them, they had formed most of my

theoretical and practical Christian education.“

Chandler, Tertins. “The Controversy over Joseph Smith.” Part I dated July 14, 1952 and Part II dated September 1, 1952.

Unpublished.

Discussion of Nibley’s review of No Man Knows My History.

Charlesworth, James H. “From the Philopedia of Jesus to the Misopedia of the Acts of Thomas.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

The purpose of this little essay is to reveal that Jesus’ philopedia was so altered by some second-century Christian groups that it became misopedia. Jesus’ own teachings were sometimes changed or even abandoned by those who called him “Lord“.

Cheesman, Paul R. “External Evidences of the Book of Mormon.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

An exploration into Quetzalcoatl—the white, bearded, blue-eyed king of gods for many ancient cultures—and what that might represent in regards to the Book of Mormon and its message.

Clark, E. Douglas. “Foreword.” In Abraham in Egypt, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 14, 2nd ed. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2000.

The Book of Abraham, one of the canonized works of Latter-day Saint scripture brought forth by the Prophet Joseph Smith, has been attacked by critics since its publication in 1842. In Abraham in Egypt, LDS scholar Hugh Nibley draws on his erudition in ancient languages, literature, and history to defend the book on historical and doctrinal grounds. Nibley examines the Book of Abraham’s striking connections with ancient texts and Egyptian religion and culture. He discusses the book’s many nonbiblical themes that are found in apocryphal literature not known or available in Smith’s day. In opening up many other lines of inquiry, Nibley lays an essential foundation for further research on the biblical patriarch Abraham. This enlarged, second edition of Nibley’s classic 1981 work of the same title updates the endnotes, includes many illustrations, and adds several chapters taken from a series of articles in the Improvement Era entitled “A Look at the Pearl of Great Price,” which Nibley wrote between 1968 and 1970.

Compton, Todd M. “Foreword.” In Mormonism and Early Christianity, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley 4, edited by Todd M. Compton and Stephen D. Ricks. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 1987.
Compton, Todd M. “Hugh Nibley, Lehi in the Desert, The World of the Jaredites, There Were Jaredites; An Approach to the Book of Mormon; and Since Cumorah.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 1 (1989): 114-118.

Since 1989, the Review of Books on the Book of Mormon has published review essays to help serious readers make informed choices and judgments about books and other publications on topics related to the Latter-day Saint religious tradition. It has also published substantial freestanding essays that made further contributions to the field of Mormon studies. In 1996, the journal changed its name to the FARMS Review with Volume 8, No 1. In 2011, the journal was renamed Mormon Studies Review.

A review of Lehi in the Desert, The World of the Jaredites, There Were Jaredites; An Approach to the Book of Mormon; and Since Cumorah, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley vols. 5, 6, and 7, respectively.

Compton, Todd M. Review of Lehi in the Desert, The World of the Jaredites, There Were Jaredites; An Approach to the Book of Mormon; Since Cumorah. Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 1 (1989): 114–18.
Compton, Todd M. “The Handclasp and Embrace as Tokens of Recognition.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

Excerpted from a longer paper published in Epoché, the UCLA graduate journal of history of religions, in 1985.

A study of the religious significance of symbols, signs, and tokens.

Luschin, Immo, Richard O. Cowan, Arthur D. Haycock, Robert L. Simpson, Hugh W. Nibley, and Stephen D. Ricks. “Temples.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism 4, edited by Daniel H. Ludlow. New York: Macmillan, 1992.

An encyclopedia of church terminology.

Explains various parts of the temples from temple worship, to the history of temples, to how members worship in the temples.

Crandall, Justin. “Hugh Nibley: A Man of Paradoxes and Disagreements.” Mormon Times, 19 February 2010.

This article can now be found in the Deseret News archives.

A report on a lecture given by Alex Nibley as part of a series commemorating the centennial of Hugh Nibley’s birth.

D

De Groote, Michael. “Hugh Nibley's Coded Language and the Minority Mind-set.” Mormon Times, 15 November 2009.

This article can now be found in the Deseret News archives.

A summary of Boyd J. Petersen’s remarks at a Utah Valley University conference on “outmigration“ and some thoughts about the address.

De Groote, Michael. “Hugh Nibley: The Hidden Power of Christmas.” Mormon Times, 18 December 2009.

This article can now be found in the Deseret News archives.

A summary of Hugh Nibley’s article “The Christmas Quest.“

De Groote, Michael. “Critics Couldn’t Touch Nibley’s Faith.” Mormon Times, 15 January 2010.

A summary of Hugh Nibley’s vindication of Joseph Smith’s character, as told to the article’s writer by Richard Bushman.

De Groote, Michael. “Hugh Nibley's Defense of Truth.” Mormon Times, 5 February 2010.

This article can now be found in the Deseret News archives.

A look at Hugh Nibley’s works through an apologist lens.

De Groote, Michael. “The Truth about Hugh Nibley Myths.” Mormon Times, 5 March 2010.

Found in the “Faith” and“Mormon Times” sections of the journal.

A discussion of what truths may lie behind the many stories about Hugh Nibley and what we can learn from each of them.

De Groote, Michael. “Hugh Nibley Writings That Changed the Church.” Mormon Times, 11 March 2010.

How influential Hugh Nibley was, and a list of his most notable works.

De Groote, Michael. “Hugh Nibley, a Modern Socrates.” Mormon Times, 2 April 2010.

This article can now be found in the Deseret News archives.

Comparing Hugh Nibley to Socrates.

De Groote, Michael. “Egyptology, Hugh Nibley and the Really Big Book.” Mormon Times, 9 April 2010.

This article can now be found in the Deseret News archives.

Reflections about how Hugh Nibley’s book One Eternal Round was completed after his death.

De Groote, Michael. “One Eternal Round Focuses on Facsimile 2 from the Book of Abraham.” Mormon Times, 22 April 2010.
De Hoyos, Genevieve. “Cultural Pluralism or Assimilation? A Dilemma of Our Times.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

An essay written with the purpose to shd some light on problems related to ethnic and racial relations, via a few different channels.

E

Eddington, Mark. “Fact or Fiction: Nibley Mystique.” Salt Lake Tribune, 7 October 2000. See Hugh Nibley Collection or Boyd Jay Petersen Collection box 15, folder 10; box 21, folder 11.
Stack, Peggy Fletcher, and Mark Eddington. “LDS Historian Nibley Dies at 94.” Salt Lake Tribune, 25 February 2005.

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2005, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Praise for Hugh Nibley and some details about his life.

England, Eugene. “Hugh Nibley as Cassandra.” Review of Since Cumorah, Approaching Zion, and Warfare and the Book of Mormon by Hugh Nibley, BYU Studies 30, no. 4 (1990): 104–16.

A review of two books and one chapter, all written by Hugh Nibley.

A review that expresses the author’s feeling that Hugh Nibley predicts the future accurately but no one believes him, much as Cassandra does in Greek mythology.

England, Eugene. “A Second Witness for the Logos: The Book of Mormon and Contemporary Literary Criticism.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

Until recently, attempts to vindicate the central claim of the Book of Mormon about itself—that it is a divinely inspired book based on the history of an ancient culture—have focused mainly on external evidences. Such attempts examine parallels in the geographies, cultures, and literatures of the Middle East and ancient America (especially parallels to knowledge that have become available only since Joseph Smith’s time). These parallels are used to prove that the Book of Mormon is consistent with ancient knowledge and forms which Joseph Smith could have known only through an ancient manuscript and revelation. This essay takes a different approach, based essentially on internal evidence provided by the book itself. My reflections, stimulated by the work of Mormon scholars such as John Welch, Noel Reynolds, and Bruce Jorgensen, examine techniques developed by non-Mormon literary critics Northrop Frye and Rene Girard in their work on the Bible.

Everett, Rebecca Fechser. “The Blueprint.” “The Blueprint (Upon Pondering Nibley’s Temple and Cosmos)”; “A Note of Explanation upon the Portrait of Hugh W. Nibley.” Hugh Nibley Collection or Boyd Jay Petersen Collection box 15, folder 3, undated.

A poem that captures the spirit of the Book of Abraham.

Everett, Rebecca Fechser. “About the Portrait of Hugh Nibley.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

An essay written about a painted portrait of Hugh Nibley.

F

Ferrin, Kristina L. “Nibley Becoming a BYU Tradition: Teaching in 45th Year at Y.” Daily Universe, 27 March 1991. 10.
Florence, Giles H., Jr. “Observing the Observer: A Personal Look at Hugh Nibley, for Insights into a Faithful Life.” BYU Magazine, Spring 2001, 26–31.

A look into Hugh Nibley’s life.

G

Gee, John. “Hugh Nibley Dies at 94.” Insights 25, no. 1 (2005): 2.
Gee, John. “Introduction to the Second Edition.” In The Message of the Joseph Smith Papyri: An Egyptian Endowment, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 16, 2nd ed. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2005.

This is the first and still the only book-length commentary on the Joseph Smith Papyri. In this long-awaited new edition, with expanded text and numerous illustrations, Professor Nibley shows that the papyri are not the source of the Book of Abraham. Rather than focusing on what the papyri are not, as most commentators have done, Nibley masterfully explores what the papyri are and what they meant in ancient times. He demonstrates how these ancient Egyptian papyri contain a message that is of particular interest to Latter-day Saints.

Gee, John. “Hugh Nibley and the Joseph Smith Papyri.” In An Approach to the Book of Abraham, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 18. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2009.

Reflections on Hugh Nibley’s work with Egyptian artifacts and papyri, especially the Joseph Smith Papyri.

Gee, John. “‘A Stranger in a Strange Land’: Hugh Nibley as an Egyptologist.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh W. Nibley (1910–2005) was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century, with wide-ranging interests in scripture, history, and social issues. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley comprise nineteen weighty volumes. But he was also one of the most enigmatic observers of the Church. In this volume readers will discover that the personal stories and perspectives behind the scholarship are sometimes even more captivating than his brilliant and witty intellectual breakthroughs. This comprehensive three-part collection of essays sheds fascinating new light on Hugh Nibley as a scholar and a man. Part 1, entitled “Portraits,” contains the first collection of observations—a “spiritual” portrait of Hugh Nibley by his close friend and colleague John W. “Jack” Welch, a description of the physical portrait by Rebecca Everett hanging in the Hugh Nibley Ancient Studies room at Brigham Young University, and a biographical portrait by Hugh himself. Part 2, “Nibley, the Scholar,” contains expanded and updated versions of the almost forgotten audio and video recordings of the BYU Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship lecture series celebrating the centennial of Nibley’s birth in 2010. An additional set of chapters on Nibley’s scholarship rounds out this collection. Part 3, “Nibley, the Man,” includes tributes given by family members and others at Nibley’s funeral service. A series of entertaining personal stories, reminiscences, and folklore accounts concludes the volume.

Gileadi, Avraham. “Twelve Diatribes of Modern Israel.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

This essay serves as a testimony to modern Israel—the Latter-day Saints—that we are beginning to resemble God’s ancient covenant people in ways that conflict with our high ideals.

Gillum, Gary P. “All Scripture Index to Hugh Nibley's Works.” FARMS Preliminary Report.

A full list of scripture references used in works written by Hugh Nibley.

Gillum, Gary P. “Hugh Nibley: A Subject Index to His Works.” FARMS Preliminary Report.

An index sorted by subject.

Gillum, Gary P. “Nibley: An Annotated Bibliography 1939-May 1982.” FARMS Preliminary Report.

26 pages, alphabetical ignoring the FARMS ID in left column where available.

Gillum, Gary P. “Observations of Hugh Nibley: from Gillum’s 1972–2009 journals.” http://sites.lib.byu.edu/nibley/journal/.

A collection of excerpts from Gillum’s journal that mention Hugh Nibley.

Gillum, Gary P. “Bibliography from Of All Things!, 1st Edition.” Of All Things! A Nibley Quote Book. Compiled and edited by Gary P. Gillum. Salt Lake City: Signature Books. 1981. xi + 178 pp.; 167–171.

All manuscripts cited are in the Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah.

Short, selected bibliography at the end of the book.

Gillum, Gary P. “Hugh Nibley Quotes: Of the Book of Mormon.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1981. Reprinted by permission from Gary P. Gillum, Of All Things: A Nibley Quote Book. Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 1981.
Gillum, Gary P. “Complete Annotated Bibliography of Hugh Nibley’s Works.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1982.
Gillum, Gary P. “Hugh Nibley: A Subject Index to His Works.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1983.
Gillum, Gary P. “Introduction.” In Old Testament and Related Studies, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley 1, edited by John W. Welch, Gary P. Gillum, and Don E. Norton. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 1986.
Gillum, Gary P. “Repentance Also Means Rethinking.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

Although Latter-day Saints have a knowledge of the process of repentance, they lack a complete understanding of how the scriptures use the term repentance: repentance consists not only of remorse, confession, restitution, and forgiveness, but a literal changing of one’s entire perspective on life, so that eventually a Latter-day Saint may “repent of having to repent.”

Gillum, Gary P. “Editor’s Preface.” In Abraham in Egypt, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 14, 2nd ed. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2000.

The Book of Abraham, one of the canonized works of Latter-day Saint scripture brought forth by the Prophet Joseph Smith, has been attacked by critics since its publication in 1842. In Abraham in Egypt, LDS scholar Hugh Nibley draws on his erudition in ancient languages, literature, and history to defend the book on historical and doctrinal grounds. Nibley examines the Book of Abraham’s striking connections with ancient texts and Egyptian religion and culture. He discusses the book’s many nonbiblical themes that are found in apocryphal literature not known or available in Smith’s day. In opening up many other lines of inquiry, Nibley lays an essential foundation for further research on the biblical patriarch Abraham. This enlarged, second edition of Nibley’s classic 1981 work of the same title updates the endnotes, includes many illustrations, and adds several chapters taken from a series of articles in the Improvement Era entitled “A Look at the Pearl of Great Price,” which Nibley wrote between 1968 and 1970.

Gillum, Gary P. “Hugh Nibley: Scholar of the Spirit, Missionary of the Mind.” In Nibley on the Timely and the Timeless, vii–xviii. 2nd ed. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2004.

Reprinted in Hugh Nibley Observed.

Breaking down Hugh Nibley’s attributes into broad categories in order to talk about Bro. Nibley in his own context.

Gillum, Gary P. Review of Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life, by Boyd Jay Petersen. BYU Studies 43, no. 2 (2004): 167–70.
Gillum, Gary P. Review of One Eternal Round, by Hugh Nibley and Michael D. Rhodes. BYU Studies Quarterly 51, no. 1 (2012): 170–7.
Gillum, Gary P. “Hugh Nibley: Scholar of the Spirit, Missionary of the Mind.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Originally published in Nibley on the Timely and the Timeless.

Breaking down Hugh Nibley’s attributes into broad categories in order to talk about Bro. Nibley in his own context.

Gillum, Gary P. “Hugh Winder Nibley: The Man, the Scholar, the Legacy.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Reminiscing on Hugh Nibley’s role in helping the author’s conversion to the Church along, and who Bro. Nibley was as a scholar.

Gordon, Cyrus H. “A Hebrew Inscription Authenticated.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

A discussion of the Bat Creek Inscription, a Hebrew inscription found in a burial site in Loudon County, Tennessee in 1889.

Green, Doyle L., and Jay M. Todd. “The Ancient Land of Egypt.” Green, Doyle L. and Jay M. Todd.

Includes color photographs taken by the author.

Articles introducing Egypt accompanying Nibley’s series “A New Look at the Pearl of Great Price.”

Griggs, C. Wilfred. “A Great Fuss about a Scrap of Papyrus.” Review of The Message of the Joseph Smith Papyri by Hugh Nibley, Ensign, October 1975. 84.

Written by an associate member of the Institute for Ancient Studies at Brigham Young University.

A discussion of Hugh Nibley’s book The Message of the Joseph Smith Papyri and its contributions to the understanding Latter-day Saints have of the papyri today.

Griggs, C. Wilfred. “Hugh Nibley, Mentor to the Saints.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

This essay seems to have been a talk on an April Fools’ Day before its publication in Hugh Nibley Observed.

Comparisons of Hugh Nibley to Socrates.

H

Haddock, Sharon. “Hugh Nibley: Mankind Should Take Care of the Earth.” Mormon Times, 12 February 2010.

This article can now be found in the Deseret News archives.

A reflection on Hugh Nibley’s feelings about the environment and humankind’s responsibilities as stewards of the earth.

Haddock, Sharon. “Nibley a Passionate Defender of the Book of Mormon.” Mormon Times, 26 March 2010.

Describes Hugh Nibley’s passion for the Book of Mormon and how he defended it.

Haglund, Richard F., Jr. “Is There a Cure for Authoritarianism in Science?” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This essay originally appeared in a slightly different form in the unpublished “Tinkling Cymbals: Essays in Honor of Hugh Nibley,“ John W. Welch, ed., 1978.

Why science shouldn’t be the absolutely authoritative source of knowledge.

Hall, John F. “Mars and Anna Perenna: March Gods and the Etruscan New Year in Archaic Rome.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

A study into the original Roman New Year and how some of those traditions carry on now in March instead.

Welch, John W., and John F. Hall. “Editors’ Postscript.” In Apostles and Bishops in Early Christianity, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 15. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2005.
Welch, John W., and John F. Hall. “Editor’s Preface.” In Apostles and Bishops in Early Christianity, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 15. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2005.
Welch, John W., Joseph Ponczoch, and John F. Hall. “Overview.” In Apostles and Bishops in Early Christianity, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 15. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2005.
Hamblin, William J. “Aspects of an Early Christian Initiation Ritual.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

What accounts for the parallels between modern temple rituals and ancient Judeo-Christian ceremonies?

Hamblin, William J. “Time Vindicates Hugh Nibley.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): Article 18.

Since 1989, the Review of Books on the Book of Mormon has published review essays to help serious readers make informed choices and judgments about books and other publications on topics related to the Latter-day Saint religious tradition. It has also published substantial freestanding essays that made further contributions to the field of Mormon studies. In 1996, the journal changed its name to the FARMS Review with Volume 8, No 1. In 2011, the journal was renamed Mormon Studies Review.

Review of An Approach to the Book of Mormon (1988), by Hugh Nibley.

Peterson, Daniel C., and William J. Hamblin. “In Memoriam: Hugh Winder Nibley (1910-2005).” Meridian Magazine, 28 February 2005. https://latterdaysaintmag.com/article-1-4261/.
Hamblin, William J. “Joseph or Jung?” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

This chapter is adapted from a review of Douglas F. Salmon, “Parallelomania and the Study of Latter-day Scripture: Confirmation, Coincidence, or the Collective Unconscious,“ Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 33, no. 2 (2000): 129–56. The article was originally published as William J. Hamblin and Gordon C. Thomasson, “Joseph or Jung? A Response to Douglas Salmon,“ FARMS Review of Books 13, no. 2 (2001): 87–107.

A review of an article written by Douglas F. Salmon.

Hamilton, Andrew. “Bradshaw, Ricks, & Whitlock, Hugh Nibley Observed (Reviewed by Andrew Hamilton).” In “Dawning of a Brighter Day from the Association for Mormon Letters.” http://associationmormonletters.org/blog/reviews/current-reviews/bradshaw-ricks-whitlock-hugh-nibley-observed-reviewed-by-andrew-hamilton/.

Reviewed for the Association of Mormon Letters.

A review of Hugh Nibley Observed that draws on the reviewer’s own experiences with Nibley and his writings.

Harmon, Dick. “Kresimir Cosic honored in Croatia, teammate on hand for celebration.” Deseret News, 8 Jun 2015.

Deseret News, 8 Jun 2015

The author remembers a trip to Croatia and the places where Kresimir Cosic (Europe’s Michael Jordan equivalent) lived.

Harmon, Dick. “Kresimir Cosic’s adventure to get to BYU was as complex as it was destined.” Deseret News, 19 April 2020.

Deseret News, 19 Apr 2020

“Kresimir Cosic arrived on BYU’s campus without knowing the language, the school’s

affiliation to a church, the honor code or its unique culture. Yet, he survived and starred.“

Hauglid, Brian M. “Nibley’s Abraham in Egypt: Laying the Foundation for Abraham Research.” The FARMS Review 15, no. 1 (2003): Article 9.

Since 1989, the Review of Books on the Book of Mormon has published review essays to help serious readers make informed choices and judgments about books and other publications on topics related to the Latter-day Saint religious tradition. It has also published substantial freestanding essays that made further contributions to the field of Mormon studies. In 1996, the journal changed its name to the FARMS Review with Volume 8, No 1. In 2011, the journal was renamed Mormon Studies Review.

Review of Hugh Nibley. Abraham in Egypt.

Luschin, Immo, Richard O. Cowan, Arthur D. Haycock, Robert L. Simpson, Hugh W. Nibley, and Stephen D. Ricks. “Temples.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism 4, edited by Daniel H. Ludlow. New York: Macmillan, 1992.

An encyclopedia of church terminology.

Explains various parts of the temples from temple worship, to the history of temples, to how members worship in the temples.

Haymond, Bryce M. “Introduction to Ancient Temples & Sacred Symbolism.” Haymond, Bryce.

References to Hugh Nibley weekly lecture series at Brigham Young University.

Hogge, Robert M. Review of Sergeant Nibley PhD: Memories of an Unlikely Screaming Eagle, by Hugh Nibley and Alex Nibley. Journal of Mormon History 33, no. 3 (2007): 204–7.
Holland, Jeffrey M. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Elder Jeffrey R. Holland.” 2 March 2005.

Also a statement from the First Presidency.

Holland, Jeffrey M. “Hugh Nibley Introduction.” BYU Commencement, 2 March 2005.

Elder Holland’s introduction of Hugh Nibley at BYU Commencement.

Holsinger, Emily. “Hugh Nibley’s Brush with Death.” Student Review, 4 November 1987, 3, 7; see box 17, folder 7.

A student’s interview with Hugh Nibley about Bro. Nibley’s near-death experience.

Honey, David B. “Ecological Nomadism versus Epic Heroism in Ether: Nibley's Works on the Jaredites.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): Article 20.

Also available for free at BYU ScholarsArchive.

A review of Lehi in the Desert, The World of the Jaredites, There Were Jaredites, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley vol. 5.

Honey, David B. “Heroic Legitimation in Traditional Nomadic Societies.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

An essay written in celebration of Hugh Nibley and his contributions to questions about steppe nomadism.

Honey, David B. Review of The Ancient State: The Rulers and the Ruled. BYU Studies 32, no. 3 (1992): 103–11.
Hoskisson, Paul Y. “An Introduction to the Relevance of and a Methodology for a Study of the Proper Names of the Book of Mormon.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

A discussion about proper names for the Book of Mormon and the relevance of name studies to studying the Book of Mormon.

Huchel, Frederick M. “Combined Table of Contents and Index of Titles for The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley.” FARMS.

Indexes of volumes 1–13 of the Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, printed as a half page booklet. Contains an alphabetical article listing at end.

Huchel, Frederick M. “Combined Table of Contents and Index of Titles for The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley.” FARMS.

Indexes of vol 1–13 of the Collected Works of Hugh Nibley containing an alphabetical article listing at end.

Huggins, Ronald V. “Hugh Nibley’s Footnotes.” Salt Lake City Messenger, no. 110, May 2008, 9–21.
Huntsman, Eric D. “Hugh Nibley and Classical Scholarship.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Reflections on Hugh Nibley and his work with classics.

Hutchinson, Terry L. “Meeting a Doorkeeper in the House of the Lord: A Review of ‘Hugh Nibley Observed’” In Meridian Magazine, 1 June 2021. https://latterdaysaintmag.com/meeting-a-doorkeeper-in-the-house-of-the-lord-a-review-of-hugh-nibley-observed/.

Praises the book Hugh Nibley Observed for its more complete portrait of Hugh Nibley.

I

Irvine, Arnold J. “Hugh Nibley: Always Studying, Always Learning, Always on the Go.” Deseret News Supplement, 15 April 1984. 4.
Irvine, Arnold J. “Hugh Nibley: Profile of a Scholar.” Utah Magazine, Sunday, 15 April 1984, 4–6.
Israelsen-Hartley, Sara. “Mormon Author High Nibley Honored with BYU Lecture Series.” Deseret News, 28 January 2010.

The Deseret News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.

Suggests that Latter-day Saints can honor Hugh Nibley by knowing why they believe what they do.

J

Jackson, Kent P. Review of Old Testament and Related Studies, by Hugh Nibley. BYU Studies 28, no. 4 (1988): 114–19.
Jackson, Kent P. “‘Watch and Remember’: The New Testament and the Great Apostasy.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

In this paper the apostasy will be discussed on two fronts. First, Jackson examines statements of Jesus and his apostles that foretell the passing of the early church. Then, he considers the evidence in the New Testament that shows apostasy taking place as the New Testament documents were being written

Jakeman, M. Wells. Review of An Approach to the Book of Mormon, by Hugh Nibley. University Archaeological Society Newsletter 40 (1957): 1–11.
Johnson, David J. “The Woman behind the Man: A Look into the Life of Hugh Nibley’s Widow.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

This is an interview with Phyllis Nibley.

Description of Phyllis Nibley’s life.

Johnston, Jerry. “A Legendary Passion for Books and Languages.” Deseret News, Friday, 31 October 1980, C1.

Reprinted in Eloquent Witness, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley 17. 80–82.

Johnston, a staff reporter for the Deseret News, conducted a series of interviews concerning the reading habits of prominent Utahns. This was the eighth in the series. Nibley listed, as his favorite books, the following: (1) Shakespeare, Complete Works; (2) Book of Mormon; (3) Homer, Odyssey; (4) Goethe, Faust; (5) Gaius Petronius, Satyricon; (6) Jean Froissart, Chronicles. Nibley also said that by age thirteen, he knew Macbeth by heart and tried to learn Hamlet but found it too long.

Johnston, Jerry. “Awards Are Almost Routine for Legendary Writer Nibley.” Deseret News, 27 August 1995.

An article written about Brother Nibley’s acceptance of the 1995 Frankie and John Kenneth Orton Award for LDS Literature.

Johnston, Jerry. “Don’t Fret—Nibley’s Shoes Will Be Filled.” Deseret News, 12 March 2005.

Thoughts about Hugh Nibley’s passing.

K

Keller, Sharon R. “Two Letters to the Dead.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

A treatment of two out of thirteen of the Egyptian Letters to the Dead: the Cairo Bowl and the Berlin Bowl.

King, Arthur Henry. “Language, Humour, Character, and Persona in Shakespeare.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

This essay goes into the meanings of character, humour, and persona and how Shakespeare uses them in his plays to create different stories.

King, Arthur Henry, and C. Terry Warner. “Talent and the Individual’s Tradition: History as Art, and Art as Moral Response.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

Expresses a modification of T. S. Eliot’s these that expands the usual connotations of the terms “talent” and “tradition,” which suggests that there is a strong sense in which talents are fully employed by individuals only when they do not regard them as their own, and that there is an equally strong sense in which tradition exists only in the form of individuals in whom it is reincarnated.

Knight, Hal. “Behind the Legend, There's a Man.” Deseret News, 1 September 1976. See Hugh Nibley Collection or Boyd Jay Petersen Collection box 21, folder 1.

L

Larson, Clinton F. “Scholar.” in Centennial Portraits, 1976. 50. See Hugh Nibley Collection or the Boyd Jay Petersen Collection box 15, folder 11.
Larson, Stan. “Hugh Nibley Interview by Stan Larson.” Everett L. Cooley Oral History Project No. 325, 19 April 1990. See Hugh Nibley Collection or Boyd Jay Petersen Collection box 17, folder 7.

Interview transcript.

An interview with Hugh Nibley covering everything from early life and academics to his patriarchal blessing (and his refusal to talk about it) to his work.

Lloyd, R. Scott. “Scholar Advances to Next Great Stage.” Church News, 5 March 2005. See Hugh Nibley Collection or the Boyd Jay Petersen Collection box 21, folder 14.

Attendees paid tribute through speech, craftsmanship, and music.

A tribute to Hugh Nibley.

Ricks, Stephen D., and John M. Lundquist. By Study and Also By Faith, Volume 1. Provo, UT/Salt Lake City: FARMS/Deseret Book, 1990.

Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990.

Essays based on what people have learned from Hugh Nibley.

Lundquist, John M. “What Is Reality?” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

An argument that the Real, or Reality, is where God dwells.

Ricks, Stephen D., and John M. Lundquist. By Study and Also By Faith, Volume 2. Provo, UT/Salt Lake City: FARMS/Deseret Book, 1990.

Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990.

Essays based on what people have learned from Hugh Nibley.

Lundquist, Suzanne E. “Native American Rites of Passage: Implications for Latter-day Saints.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

A comparison of Native American rituals with rituals in The Church of Jesus Christ of latter-day Saints.

Luschin, Immo, Richard O. Cowan, Arthur D. Haycock, Robert L. Simpson, Hugh W. Nibley, and Stephen D. Ricks. “Temples.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism 4, edited by Daniel H. Ludlow. New York: Macmillan, 1992.

An encyclopedia of church terminology.

Explains various parts of the temples from temple worship, to the history of temples, to how members worship in the temples.

Lyon, Tania Rands. Review of Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life, by Boyd Jay Petersen. Dialogue 36, no. 1 (2003): 198–201.
Lythgoe, Dennis L. “Age Hasn't Slowed Sharp Wit, Mind.” Deseret News, 31 January 2003.
Lythgoe, Dennis L. “Consecrated Life Chronicles Nine Decades of Marvelous Wit.” Review of Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life by Boyd J. Petersen, Deseret News, 31 January 2003, C04.

An article written in praise of Hugh Nibley.

Lythgoe, Dennis L. “Nibley Biographer Is Son-in-Law, Fan.” Deseret News, 31 January 2003.

The Deseret News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States.

Describes Boyd Petersen’s experience collecting material for and writing Hugh Nibley’s biography.

M

Mackay, Thomas W. “Early Christian Millenarianist Interpretation of the Two Witnesses in John’s Apocalypse 11:3–13.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

A sketch of some medieval European Christian exegetical and homiletic traditions, which analyzes references from the second century to the Carolingian Renaissance.

Madsen, Ann N. “Hugh Nibley and the Bible: ‘Look! And I Looked’” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh Nibley had a wealth of knowledge. Ann Madsen had the opportunity to catch much of it in a graduate class. These are her thoughts about his works and about Bro. Nibley as a teacher, person, and friend.

Madsen, Truman G. “Foreword.” In Nibley on the Timely and the Timeless, ix–xvii. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1978.

Thoughts on Hugh Nibley, his personality, and his works.

Madsen, Truman G. “‘Putting on the Names’: A Jewish-Christian Legacy.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

Addresses the argument that names are simply sounds made up to label something and suggests that this takes away from the religious belief that some names have a divine origin.

Madsen, Truman G. “Foreword to the First Edition.” In Nibley on the Timely and the Timeless, xix–xxviii. 2nd ed. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2004.

Thoughts on Hugh Nibley, his personality, and his works.

Madsen, Truman G. “Hugh Nibley: A Prodigy, an Enigma, and a Symbol.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Reflections on Hugh Nibley’s personal history, habits, and work.

Magleby, Kirk. “Hugh Nibley and Book of Mormon Geography.” Salt Lake City: Book of Mormon Archaeological Forum, 2010.

Discussion about Hugh Nibley’s work on the Book of Mormon’s potential geography.

Maynes, Todd F. “Nibleys: Pianist, Scholar, Brilliant but Different.” Daily Universe, 1 November 1982; see box 17, folder 7.
McKinlay, Daniel B. “Appendix: Echoes and Evidences from the Writings of Hugh Nibley.” In Echoes and Evidences of the Book of Mormon, edited by Donald W. Parry, Daniel C. Peterson and John W. Welch, 453-506. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2002.

A discussion of evidence of the Book of Mormon’s authenticity.

McKinlay, Daniel B., Hugh W. Nibley, and Steven W. Booras. “The Dead Sea Scrolls: Select Publications by Latter-day Saint Scholars.” Studies in the Bible and Antiquity 2 no. 1 (2010).

Select bibliography of LDS research on the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Mesle, C. Robert. Review of Since Cumorah: The Book of Mormon in the Modern World, by Hugh Nibley. Courage 2, no. 1 (1971): 331–32.
Midgley, Louis C. Review of One Eternal Round, by Hugh Nibley and Michael D. Rhodes. Association for Mormon Letters.
Midgley, Louis C. Review of One Eternal Round, by Hugh Nibley and Michael D. Rhodes. Confestti Antiques and Books.
Midgley, Louis C. “Hugh Nibley: A Short Bibliographical Note.” Dialogue 2, no. 1 (1967): 119–21.

A quick introduction to Hugh Nibley followed by an annotated list of his works.

Midgley, Louis C. “The Secular Relevance of the Gospel.” Review of Since Cumorah, by Hugh Nibley. Dialogue 4, no. 4 (1969): 76–85.

Looks at how Hugh Nibley strives to provide answers to the questions: (1) What message has the Book of Mormon for our world? and (2) Does it speak to those who sense their own involvement in the greatness and the misery of secular existence?

Midgley, Louis C. “Hugh Nibley: The Portrait of a Leader.” Improvement Era, 1961-1970 (Volumes 64-73); 1970 (Volume 73); 1970 May (No. 5), Church History Library, 79–81.

The name of Hugh Nibley has become a byword within the Church in the past two decades, primarily as a result of his writings published in the pages of the Improvement Era for 21 years. Since 1948, only six volumes of the Era have been published without the by-line of Hugh Nibley, which is usually part of an extended series of articles. His brilliant, incisive mind, fortified on one hand by fluency in some ten languages and strengthened on the other by his strong faith in the gospel’s message, has blessed countless readers. But it is his zest for knowledge, his joy in discovery, and his thrill at uncovering old things for us to view anew that have endeared him to all who have read his works. In this respect, Brother Nibley represents a symbol of the person hungering and thirsting after knowledge, an ideal that most individuals could well adapt for the betterment and fulfillment of their own personal lives. In this spirit, as his current series is concluded, the Era is pleased to feature Brother Nibley as a fitting symbol of one who has truly found many adventures in learning.

Midgley, Louis C. “Bibliography from Nibley on the Timely and Timeless, 1st Edition.” Nibley on the Timely and the Timeless: Classic Essays of Hugh Nibley, Provo, UT: RSC. 1978. xxviii + 323 pp.; 307–323.

Contains 95 listings from 1926 to 1977.

Midgley, Louis C. “Hugh W. Nibley: Bibliography and Register.” FARMS Study Aid, MID-88, 10 August 1988. 65 pp.

65 pages.

Contains a description of the Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, followed by chronological listings with annotations.

Midgley, Louis C. “Hugh Winder Nibley: Bibliography and Register.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990. xv–lxxxvii.

Reprinted in 2021.

The most recent and most complete Nibley bibliography, updated from the 2010 version.

Midgley, Louis C. “The Challenge of Historical Consciousness: Mormon History and the Encounter with Secular Modernity.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

A study showing that the Book of Mormon and Joseph Smith’s prophecies are being discussed in an arena in which there is a struggle for control of the past of the Latter-day Saints.

Midgley, Louis C. “Directions That Diverge.” Review of The Ancient State: The Rulers and Ruled, FARMS Review of Books 11, no. 1, (1999): 27–87.

A thorough review of Hugh Nibley’s book The Ancient State: The Rulers and the Ruled.

Midgley, Louis C. “Hugh W. Nibley. The Ancient State: The Rulers and the Ruled.” FARMS Review of Books 11, no. 1 (1999): Article 8.

Available for free at BYU ScholarsArchive.

A review of Ancient State: The Rulers and the Ruled, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley vol. 10.

Midgley, Louis C. “A Mighty Kauri Has Fallen: Hugh Winder Nibley (1910–2005).” The FARMS Review 17, no. 1 (2005): Article 14.

Since 1989, the Review of Books on the Book of Mormon has published review essays to help serious readers make informed choices and judgments about books and other publications on topics related to the Latter-day Saint religious tradition. It has also published substantial freestanding essays that made further contributions to the field of Mormon studies. In 1996, the journal changed its name to the FARMS Review with Volume 8, No 1. In 2011, the journal was renamed Mormon Studies Review.

The author reflects on the lasting influence of the eminent Latter-day Saint scholar Hugh Nibley, whose far-reaching scholarship, unmatched erudition, and vigorous defense of the Mormon faith established Mormon studies on a solid foundation and pointed the way for others to follow.

Midgley, Louis C. “Hugh Nibley Subject Index.” Hugh Nibley Collection in the Harold B. Lee Library at Brigham Young University.

Index from the Harold B. Lee Library at Brigham Young University.

An index covering the books and articles written by Hugh Nibley.

Midgley, Louis C. “The Nibley Legacy.” The FARMS Review 20, no. 2 (2008): Article 13.

Reprinted in Eloquent Witness: Nibley on Himself, Others, and the Temple, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley 17.

Review of Hugh Nibley. Eloquent Witness: Nibley on Himself, Others, and the Temple, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley 17.

Midgley, Louis C. “Bibliography of Hugh Winder Nibley's Work, Secondary Material about Him, and Reviews of His Work.” Provo, UT: Maxwell Institute, 2010.

A detailed list of works by and about Hugh Nibley with commentary.

Midgley, Louis C. Review of One Eternal Round, by Hugh Nibley and Michael D. Rhodes. FARMS Review 22, no. 1 (2010): 282–85.
Midgley, Louis C. “Out of Obscurity: The Story of Nibley’s ‘Beyond Politics’” Mormon Studies Review 23, no. 1 (2011): Article 11.

Since 1989, the Review of Books on the Book of Mormon has published review essays to help serious readers make informed choices and judgments about books and other publications on topics related to the Latter-day Saint religious tradition. It has also published substantial freestanding essays that made further contributions to the field of Mormon studies. In 1996, the journal changed its name to the FARMS Review with Volume 8, No 1. In 2011, the journal was renamed Mormon Studies Review.

An explanation of why “Beyond Politics” was never published.

Midgley, Louis C. “A Mighty Kauri Has Fallen: Hugh Winder Nibley (1910–2005).” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh W. Nibley (1910–2005) was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century, with wide-ranging interests in scripture, history, and social issues. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley comprise nineteen weighty volumes. But he was also one of the most enigmatic observers of the Church. In this volume readers will discover that the personal stories and perspectives behind the scholarship are sometimes even more captivating than his brilliant and witty intellectual breakthroughs. This comprehensive three-part collection of essays sheds fascinating new light on Hugh Nibley as a scholar and a man. Part 1, entitled “Portraits,” contains the first collection of observations—a “spiritual” portrait of Hugh Nibley by his close friend and colleague John W. “Jack” Welch, a description of the physical portrait by Rebecca Everett hanging in the Hugh Nibley Ancient Studies room at Brigham Young University, and a biographical portrait by Hugh himself. Part 2, “Nibley, the Scholar,” contains expanded and updated versions of the almost forgotten audio and video recordings of the BYU Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship lecture series celebrating the centennial of Nibley’s birth in 2010. An additional set of chapters on Nibley’s scholarship rounds out this collection. Part 3, “Nibley, the Man,” includes tributes given by family members and others at Nibley’s funeral service. A series of entertaining personal stories, reminiscences, and folklore accounts concludes the volume.

The author reflects on the lasting influence of the eminent Latter-day Saint scholar Hugh Nibley, whose far-reaching scholarship, unmatched erudition, and vigorous defense of the Mormon faith established Mormon studies on a solid foundation and pointed the way for others to follow.

Midgley, Louis C. “Honoring Hugh Nibley — Again.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 45, (2021): 61-70.

The author also has an article in Hugh Nibley Observed, for which this review was written.

Hugh Nibley Observed is the third assembly of essays honoring Hugh Nibley by his friends and admirers. It differs from the other two in many ways. It is packed with photographs, observations by his children about their father, and many other similar and related items that are often deeply personal reflections on Nibley as well as the influence he has had on Latter-day Saint intellectual life and also the faith of the Saints. Its contents are far more accessible than the strictly scholarly works written by the academic friends and colleagues of Nibley. There is some of that in this book, but it contains information and reflections on a host of different aspects of the first Latter-day Saint scholar who could and did provide a competent defense of the faith and the Saints. This book is very much about Nibley and not merely for him, as were the two previous efforts to honor him.

Midgley, Louis C. “Hugh Winder Nibley: Bibliography and Register.” Midgley, Louis and Ricks, Shirley S.

Originally published in By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990 vol. 1.

The most recent and most complete Nibley bibliography, updated from the 2010 version.

Milgrom, Jacob. “Milk and Meat: Unlikely Bedfellows.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

Studies the prohibition against eating meat in the Old Testament.

Millet, Robert L. “Hugh Nibley and the Church.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Personal reflections on Hugh Nibley and his contributions to religious studies.

Mincek, Christina Nibley. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Christina Nibley Mincek.” 2 March 2005.
Mincek, Christina Nibley. “Remembering My Father.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh W. Nibley (1910–2005) was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century, with wide-ranging interests in scripture, history, and social issues. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley comprise nineteen weighty volumes. But he was also one of the most enigmatic observers of the Church. In this volume readers will discover that the personal stories and perspectives behind the scholarship are sometimes even more captivating than his brilliant and witty intellectual breakthroughs. This comprehensive three-part collection of essays sheds fascinating new light on Hugh Nibley as a scholar and a man. Part 1, entitled “Portraits,” contains the first collection of observations—a “spiritual” portrait of Hugh Nibley by his close friend and colleague John W. “Jack” Welch, a description of the physical portrait by Rebecca Everett hanging in the Hugh Nibley Ancient Studies room at Brigham Young University, and a biographical portrait by Hugh himself. Part 2, “Nibley, the Scholar,” contains expanded and updated versions of the almost forgotten audio and video recordings of the BYU Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship lecture series celebrating the centennial of Nibley’s birth in 2010. An additional set of chapters on Nibley’s scholarship rounds out this collection. Part 3, “Nibley, the Man,” includes tributes given by family members and others at Nibley’s funeral service. A series of entertaining personal stories, reminiscences, and folklore accounts concludes the volume.

A reminiscence of Hugh Nibley from his daughter.

Moore, Carrie A. “Revered LDS Scholar Hugh Nibley Dies at 94.” Deseret Morning News, 25 February 2005.

Found in the “Utah” section of the newspaper.

A brief discussion of Hugh Nibley’s life and the influence he had inside and outside of the Church.

Moore, Carrie A. “Hugh Nibley Laid to Rest.” Deseret News, 3 March 2005. See Hugh Nibley Collection or Boyd Jay Petersen box 21, folder 13.

Hugh Nibley is remembered as a brilliant scholar, loving father, and humanitarian.

N

Needle, Jeffrey. Review of The Message of the Joseph Smith Papyri, 2nd ed., by Hugh Nibley. Association for Mormon Letters, 25 January 2006.
Needle, Jeffrey. Review of Eloquent Witness: Nibley on Himself, Others, and the Temple, by Hugh Nibley. Association for Mormon Letters, 25 August 2008.
Needle, Jeffrey. Review of An Approach to the Book of Abraham, by Hugh Nibley. Association for Mormon Letters, 14 October 2009.
Neusner, Jacob. “The Case of Leviticus Rabbah.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

Exactly how did the scriptures enter the framework of Judaism? In what way, when, and where, in the unfolding of the canon, were they absorbed and recast, and how did they find the distinctive role they played from late antiquity onward?

Neusner, Jacob. “Why No New Judaisms in the Twentieth Century?” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

A shorter version of this article appeared as “Can Judaism Survive the Twentieth Century?“ Tikkun 4, no. 4 (July–August 1989): 38–42.

An explanation of what conditions favor the formation of religious systems, with particular attention to the condition of Judaism in the twentieth century.

Newman, Nick. “A View into How Hugh Nibley Studied the Truth.” Mormon Times, 26 February 2010.

Found in the “Faith” section of the journal.

An explanation of what questions Hugh Nibley would ask and what types of things he would look for in his studies.

Newman, Nick. “Classical Scholarship Drove Nibley to Religion.” Mormon Times, 19 March 2010.
Nibley, Alex. “Graduate School through BYU.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Originally presented as remarks for Hugh Nibley’s funeral.

Covers much of Hugh Nibley’s life from his time in graduate school to him becoming a teacher at BYU.

Nibley, Alex. “Hugh Nibley, World’s Worst Politician.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

This chapter was reprinted with permission from Alex Nibley and Hugh W. Nibley’s Beyond Politics (2013).

Hugh Nibley’s son talks about Bro. Nibley’s political stances, traditions, and tendencies to be merciful in political situations.

Nibley, Alex. “Remarks.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh W. Nibley (1910–2005) was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century, with wide-ranging interests in scripture, history, and social issues. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley comprise nineteen weighty volumes. But he was also one of the most enigmatic observers of the Church. In this volume readers will discover that the personal stories and perspectives behind the scholarship are sometimes even more captivating than his brilliant and witty intellectual breakthroughs. This comprehensive three-part collection of essays sheds fascinating new light on Hugh Nibley as a scholar and a man. Part 1, entitled “Portraits,” contains the first collection of observations—a “spiritual” portrait of Hugh Nibley by his close friend and colleague John W. “Jack” Welch, a description of the physical portrait by Rebecca Everett hanging in the Hugh Nibley Ancient Studies room at Brigham Young University, and a biographical portrait by Hugh himself. Part 2, “Nibley, the Scholar,” contains expanded and updated versions of the almost forgotten audio and video recordings of the BYU Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship lecture series celebrating the centennial of Nibley’s birth in 2010. An additional set of chapters on Nibley’s scholarship rounds out this collection. Part 3, “Nibley, the Man,” includes tributes given by family members and others at Nibley’s funeral service. A series of entertaining personal stories, reminiscences, and folklore accounts concludes the volume.

This is taken from a talk given with memories of Hugh Nibley by his son Alex at Hugh Nibley’s funeral.

Nibley, Charles Alexander. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Charles Alexander Nibley.” 2 March 2005.
Nibley, Kelly C. P., and Reid Nibley. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Kelly C. P. and Reid Nibley.” 2 March 2005.
Nibley, Michael Draper. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Michael D. Nibley.” 2 March 2005.
Nibley, Michael Draper. “In Memoriam HWN.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

A short epitaph for Hugh Nibley written by his son.

Nibley, Paul Sloan. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Paul Sloan Nibley.” 2 March 2005.
Nibley, Paul Sloan. “A Tribute to My Father.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.
Nibley, Rebecca. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Rebecca Nibley.” 2 March 2005.
Nibley, Rebecca. “Memories of a Special Occasion.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh W. Nibley (1910–2005) was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century, with wide-ranging interests in scripture, history, and social issues. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley comprise nineteen weighty volumes. But he was also one of the most enigmatic observers of the Church. In this volume readers will discover that the personal stories and perspectives behind the scholarship are sometimes even more captivating than his brilliant and witty intellectual breakthroughs. This comprehensive three-part collection of essays sheds fascinating new light on Hugh Nibley as a scholar and a man. Part 1, entitled “Portraits,” contains the first collection of observations—a “spiritual” portrait of Hugh Nibley by his close friend and colleague John W. “Jack” Welch, a description of the physical portrait by Rebecca Everett hanging in the Hugh Nibley Ancient Studies room at Brigham Young University, and a biographical portrait by Hugh himself. Part 2, “Nibley, the Scholar,” contains expanded and updated versions of the almost forgotten audio and video recordings of the BYU Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship lecture series celebrating the centennial of Nibley’s birth in 2010. An additional set of chapters on Nibley’s scholarship rounds out this collection. Part 3, “Nibley, the Man,” includes tributes given by family members and others at Nibley’s funeral service. A series of entertaining personal stories, reminiscences, and folklore accounts concludes the volume.

Nibley, Kelly C. P., and Reid Nibley. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Kelly C. P. and Reid Nibley.” 2 March 2005.
Nibley, Reid. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Reid Nibley.” 2 March 2005.
Nibley, Thomas H. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Thomas H. Nibley.” 2 March 2005.
Norman, Keith E. “Zeal in the Quest of Knowledge.” Review of Old Testament and Related Studies by Hugh Nibley, Sunstone 11, no. 2 (1987): 33–35.
Norman, Keith E. Review of Mormonism and Early Christianity, by Hugh Nibley. Whitmer Historical Association Journal 9 (1989): 108–12.
Norton, Don E. “Foreword.” In Approaching Zion, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 9. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 1989.
Norton, Don E. “Foreword.” In Temple and Cosmos: Beyond This Ignorant Present, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 12. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 1992.

In Temple and Cosmos, Brother Nibley explains the relationship of the House of the Lord to the cosmos. In Temple, the first part of the volume, he focuses on the nature, meaning, and history of the temple, discussing such topics as sacred vestments, the circle and the square, and the symbolism of the temple and its ordinances. In the second part, Cosmos, he discusses the cosmic context of the temple-the expanding gospel, apocryphal writings, religion and history, the genesis of the written word, cultural diversity in the universal church, and the terrible questions: Where did we come from? Why are we here? and Where are we going?

Norton, Don E. “Foreword.” Norton, Don, and Shirley S. Ricks.
Norton, Don E. “An Exemplary Biography.” The FARMS Review 15, no. 2 (2003): Article 18.

Access this article at BYU ScholarsArchive.

Review of Boyd Petersen’s Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life.

Norton, Don E. “Hugh Nibley and Me.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Don Norton’s experiences with Hugh NIbley.

O

Oaks, Dallin H. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Elder Dallin H. Oaks.” 2 March 2005.
Oaks, Dallin H. “Funeral Service for Hugh W. Nibley.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

These remarks were given at the Provo Tabernacle on Wednesday, March 2, 2005. Used by permission.

Reflections on the life of Hugh Nibley and his contributions as a historian.

Olsen, Mike. Review of Of All Things!. Payson Chronicle, edited by Gary Gillum, 19 May 1982. Hugh Nibley Collection or the Boyd Jay Petersen Collection box 22 folder 5.
Olson, Eric Jay. “Hint of an Explanation.” Review of The Message of the Joseph Smith Papyri: An Egyptian Endowment by Hugh Nibley, Dialogue 9, no. 4, (1974): 74–75.
Olson, Eric Jay. “The Extremes of Eclecticism.” Review of Abraham in Egypt by Hugh Nibley, Dialogue 15, no. 4, (1982): 123–5.

An in-depth review of Hugh Nibley’s book Abraham in Egypt.

P, Q

Palmer, Spencer J. “Mormon Views of Religious Resemblances.” Paper delivered at the symposia on the expanding church, at Brigham Young University, 9 april 1976.

Also in BYU Studies Quarterly 16, no. 4, Article 18.

Includes comments about Nibley’s work.

Parry, Donald W. “Sinai as Sanctuary and Mountain of God.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

Looks at temple worship in the Israelite religion, specifically with the idea that “the temple is the architectural embodiment of the cosmic mountain.”

Patai, Raphael. “Ancient Jewish Seafaring and River-faring Laws.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

This paper presents data, culled primarily from talmudic and midrashic sources, pertaining to the commercial and religious laws that governed Jewish seafaring up to ca. AD 500.

Payne, Sara. “Nibley Remembered at Broadcast Funeral.” Daily Universe, 3 March 2005; see box 21, folder 14.

A report of Hugh Nibley’s funeral and of those who will continue to remember him.

Petersen, Boyd J. “And So Forth: The Personal Hugh Nibley.” Manuscript, n.d. Boyd Jay Petersen Collection box 15, folder 6.
Petersen, Boyd J. “Something to Move Mountains: The Book of Mormon in Hugh Nibley\'s Correspondences.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6, no. 2 (1997): 1–25.

Hugh Nibley’s correspondence reveals a lifelong fascination with the Book of Mormon. This is significant for two reasons: First, Nibley has taken the book seriously longer than we have as a church, and second, the private Hugh Nibley is as devoted to the Book of Mormon as is the public man.

Nibley’s interest in the book is threefold: he recognizes the striking similarities it shares with other ancient Near Eastern texts; acknowledges its witness to Joseph Smith’s divine calling; and, most importantly, perceives the relevance and accuracy of the book’s prophetic warnings. In his letters, Nibley also addresses criticism raised against his methodology. “The potential power” of the Book of Mormon, writes Nibley, “is something to move mountains; it will only take effect when everything is pretty far gone, but then it will be dynamite. That leaves room for optimism.” Hugh Nibley’s words make that optimism contagious.

Petersen, Boyd J. “Youth and Beauty: The Correspondence of Hugh Nibley.” BYU Studies 37, no. 2 (1997–98): 25.

Personal letters written by Hugh Nibley during his youth show the fundamental consistency of his personality, style, beliefs, concerns, and penetrating perceptions throughout his lifetime.

An analysis of personal letters written by Hugh Nibley during his youth.

Petersen, Boyd J. “Something to Move Mountains: Hugh Nibley’s Devotion to the Book of Mormon.” In Colloquium Essays in Literature and Belief, 489–513. Provo, UT: Center for the Study of Christian Values in Literature, 2001.

Hugh Nibley’s correspondence reveals a lifelong fascination with the Book of Mormon. This is significant for two reasons: First, Nibley has taken the book seriously longer than we have as a church, and second, the private Hugh Nibley is as devoted to the Book of Mormon as is the public man.

Nibley’s interest in the book is threefold: he recognizes the striking similarities it shares with other ancient Near Eastern texts; acknowledges its witness to Joseph Smith’s divine calling; and, most importantly, perceives the relevance and accuracy of the book’s prophetic warnings. In his letters, Nibley also addresses criticism raised against his methodology. “The potential power” of the Book of Mormon, writes Nibley, “is something to move mountains; it will only take effect when everything is pretty far gone, but then it will be dynamite. That leaves room for optimism.” Hugh Nibley’s words make that optimism contagious.

Petersen, Boyd J. Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life. Salt Lake City: Kofford Books, 2002.

As one of the LDS Church’s most widely recognized scholars, Hugh Nibley is both an icon and an enigma. Through complete access to Nibley’s correspondence, journals, notes and papers, Petersen has painted a portrait that reveals the man behind the legend.Starting with a foreword written by Zina Nibley Peterson (the author’s wife and Nibley’s daughter) and finishing with appendixes that include some of the best of Nibley’s personal correspondence, the biography reveals aspects of the tapestry of the life of one who has truly consecrated his life to the service of the Lord.

Petersen, Boyd J. “Something to Move Mountains: Hugh Nibley and the Book of Mormon.” In Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life, 244–259. Salt Lake City: Greg Kofford Books, 2002.

Hugh Nibley’s correspondence reveals a lifelong fascination with the Book of Mormon. This is significant for two reasons: First, Nibley has taken the book seriously longer than we have as a church, and second, the private Hugh Nibley is as devoted to the Book of Mormon as is the public man.

Nibley’s interest in the book is threefold: he recognizes the striking similarities it shares with other ancient Near Eastern texts; acknowledges its witness to Joseph Smith’s divine calling; and, most importantly, perceives the relevance and accuracy of the book’s prophetic warnings. In his letters, Nibley also addresses criticism raised against his methodology. “The potential power” of the Book of Mormon, writes Nibley, “is something to move mountains; it will only take effect when everything is pretty far gone, but then it will be dynamite. That leaves room for optimism.” Hugh Nibley’s words make that optimism contagious.

Petersen, Boyd J. “Truth Is Stranger Than Folklore: Hugh Nibley: The Man and the Legend.” Sunstone, December 2002, 18–23.

an excerpt from Hugh Nibley: a Consecrated Life Greg Kofford Books, January 2003.

Did Hugh Nibley really tether a goat to his front lawn so he wouldn’t have to mow it? Did Hugh and his friend scribble Book of Mormon passages in Egyptian in one of Utah’s red rock canyons? Would he walk home from work, forgetting he had driven that day? This article looks at what truths lurk behind these and other stories.

Petersen, Boyd J. “Hugh Nibley: A Life of Faith, Learning, and Teaching.” BYU Religious Education Review (Winter 2010): 10–15.
Petersen, Sarah Sanders. “Unlikely Friendship between Basketball Star, Scholar Led to ‘Complete’ Conversion.” Deseret News, 31 January 2013.

Part of the “Mormon Times” section of the newspaper.

A look into the friendship between Hugh Nibley and Kresimir Cosic and how that friendship led to Cosic’s conversion.

Petersen, Zina Nibley. “Hugh Nibley Funeral: Zina Nibley Petersen.” 2 March 2005.
Petersen, Zina Nibley. “A Brighter Light.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Originally remarks presented at Hugh Nibley’s funeral.

A reflection on Hugh Nibley’s life as a family man and a scholar.

Petersen, Zina Nibley. “Nibley’s Early Education.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh W. Nibley (1910–2005) was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century, with wide-ranging interests in scripture, history, and social issues. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley comprise nineteen weighty volumes. But he was also one of the most enigmatic observers of the Church. In this volume readers will discover that the personal stories and perspectives behind the scholarship are sometimes even more captivating than his brilliant and witty intellectual breakthroughs. This comprehensive three-part collection of essays sheds fascinating new light on Hugh Nibley as a scholar and a man. Part 1, entitled “Portraits,” contains the first collection of observations—a “spiritual” portrait of Hugh Nibley by his close friend and colleague John W. “Jack” Welch, a description of the physical portrait by Rebecca Everett hanging in the Hugh Nibley Ancient Studies room at Brigham Young University, and a biographical portrait by Hugh himself. Part 2, “Nibley, the Scholar,” contains expanded and updated versions of the almost forgotten audio and video recordings of the BYU Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship lecture series celebrating the centennial of Nibley’s birth in 2010. An additional set of chapters on Nibley’s scholarship rounds out this collection. Part 3, “Nibley, the Man,” includes tributes given by family members and others at Nibley’s funeral service. A series of entertaining personal stories, reminiscences, and folklore accounts concludes the volume.

In this intimate glimpse of Hugh Nibley’s childhood, written by his daughter Zina, we read of what it was like for Hugh to grow up as a gifted child with Victorian parents and, in turn, what it was like for Zina and her siblings to grow up as a child in the home of Hugh and Phyllis. These poignant, never-before-told stories reveal why, in Zina’s words, “Hugh’s uniqueness lay as much in his inabilities as in his abilities, as much in what he refused to learn as what he refused to allow to remain unexamined.” And though it was obvious that his mind was extraordinarily sharp, we learn why “it was Hugh Nibley’s heart that made the difference. And it was a very good heart.”

Peterson, Daniel C. “Does the Qur’an Teach Creation Ex Nihilo?” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

A comparison between Judeo-Christian and Islamic creation traditions.

Peterson, Daniel C. “Hugh Nibley, Prophetic Book of Mormon.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): Article 21.

Since 1989, the Review of Books on the Book of Mormon has published review essays to help serious readers make informed choices and judgments about books and other publications on topics related to the Latter-day Saint religious tradition. It has also published substantial freestanding essays that made further contributions to the field of Mormon studies. In 1996, the journal changed its name to the FARMS Review with Volume 8, No 1. In 2011, the journal was renamed Mormon Studies Review.

A review of The Prophetic Book of Mormon, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley vol. 6.

Peterson, Daniel C. Review of The Prophetic Book of Mormon. Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): 164–74.
Peterson, Daniel C., and William J. Hamblin. “In Memoriam: Hugh Winder Nibley (1910-2005).” Meridian Magazine, 28 February 2005. https://latterdaysaintmag.com/article-1-4261/.
Peterson, Daniel C. “The Need for Apologetics; Hugh Nibley Was Foremost.” Mormon Times, 4 February 2010.

Describes the true meaning of the word apologetics and how Hugh Nibley used it to strengthen the Church.

Peterson, Daniel C. “Nibley as an Apologist.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh W. Nibley (1910–2005) was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century, with wide-ranging interests in scripture, history, and social issues. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley comprise nineteen weighty volumes. But he was also one of the most enigmatic observers of the Church. In this volume readers will discover that the personal stories and perspectives behind the scholarship are sometimes even more captivating than his brilliant and witty intellectual breakthroughs. This comprehensive three-part collection of essays sheds fascinating new light on Hugh Nibley as a scholar and a man. Part 1, entitled “Portraits,” contains the first collection of observations—a “spiritual” portrait of Hugh Nibley by his close friend and colleague John W. “Jack” Welch, a description of the physical portrait by Rebecca Everett hanging in the Hugh Nibley Ancient Studies room at Brigham Young University, and a biographical portrait by Hugh himself. Part 2, “Nibley, the Scholar,” contains expanded and updated versions of the almost forgotten audio and video recordings of the BYU Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship lecture series celebrating the centennial of Nibley’s birth in 2010. An additional set of chapters on Nibley’s scholarship rounds out this collection. Part 3, “Nibley, the Man,” includes tributes given by family members and others at Nibley’s funeral service. A series of entertaining personal stories, reminiscences, and folklore accounts concludes the volume.

Phillips, R. Douglas. “Foreword.” In The World and the Prophets, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley 3, edited by John W. Welch, Gary P. Gillum, and Don E. Norton. 3rd ed. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 1987.

In 1954, Hugh Nibley delivered a series of weekly lectures on KSL Radio. The series called “Time Vindicates the Prophets,” was given in answer to those who were challenging the right of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to call themselves Christians.

Phillips, R. Douglas. “The Honey and the Smoke: Achilles and Atē in the Iliad.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

An essay showing Achilles as a victim of delusion.

Poe, Jessica. “Lecturer Spotlights Life of Hugh Nibley.” Daily Universe, 19 March 2003.

A report on Boyd Petersen’s lecture at Brigham Young University, during which he shared with students the many ways Hugh Nibley has and continues to impact the Church and Brigham Young University.

Welch, John W., Joseph Ponczoch, and John F. Hall. “Overview.” In Apostles and Bishops in Early Christianity, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 15. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2005.
Porter, Bruce H., and Stephen D. Ricks. “Names in Antiquity: Old, New, and Hidden.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

Explores the connection between a name and the existence of the thing it refers to.

Quinn, D. Michael. Review of Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life, by Boyd Jay Petersen. Journal of Mormon History 30, no. 2 (2004): 259–63.

R

Warnock, Caleb, and David Randall. “Hugh Nibley: 1910–2005.” Provo Daily Herald, 25 February 2005.

An obituary for Hugh Nibley.

Rappleye, Jasmin Gimenez. “A Conversation about Hugh Nibley with Daniel C. Peterson.” In Conversations about Hugh Nibley, by Jasmin Gimenez, Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, 8 April 2021. Video.

Part of a six-part video series called Conversations about Hugh Nibley.

Enjoy the inspiring untold stories of Hugh Nibley’s life and work in the new book Hugh Nibley Observed, available in hardcover, softcover, digital, and audio formats.

In this video, Dan Peterson, a BYU professor, an articulate and entertaining writer and lecturer on the faith, and president of the Interpreter Foundation, recounts personal stories and descriptions of his experiences with Hugh Nibley over many years.

Rappleye, Jasmin Gimenez. “A Conversation about Hugh Nibley with Jack Welch.” In Conversations about Hugh Nibley, by Jasmin Gimenez, Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, 8 April 2021. Video.

Part of a six-part video series called Conversations about Hugh Nibley.

Learn more about Hugh Nibley by watching “A Conversation about Hugh Nibley with Jack Welch.” Enjoy the inspiring untold stories of his life and work in the new book Hugh Nibley Observed, available in hardcover, softcover, digital, and audio formats.

Jack Welch has been a firsthand participant in some of the most important Book of Mormon research. In addition, as the catalyst that led to the formation of the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies (FARMS) in 1979, no one is in a better position than Jack to tell the stories of its beginning and the important role of Hugh Nibley in the organization and its publications, including the nineteen-volume Collected Works of Hugh Nibley.

Rappleye, Jasmin Gimenez. “A Conversation about Hugh Nibley with Jeffrey M. Bradshaw.” In Conversations about Hugh Nibley, by Jasmin Gimenez, Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, 8 April 2021. Video.

Part of a six-part video series called Conversations about Hugh Nibley.

Enjoy the inspiring untold stories of Hugh Nibley’s life and work in the new book Hugh Nibley Observed, available in hardcover, softcover, digital, and audio formats.

In this video, Jeff, one of the editors of Hugh Nibley Observed, recounts how the idea for the book germinated and discusses why Hugh Nibley’s example as a scholar and a disciple is more relevant now than ever before.

Rappleye, Jasmin Gimenez. “A Conversation about Hugh Nibley with Kirk Magleby.” In Conversations about Hugh Nibley, by Jasmin Gimenez, Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, 8 April 2021. Video.

Part of a six-part video series called Conversations about Hugh Nibley.

Enjoy the inspiring untold stories of Hugh Nibley’s life and work in the new book Hugh Nibley Observed, available in hardcover, softcover, digital, and audio formats.

In this video, Kirk Magleby, involved for many years with FARMS and a principal actor in Book of Mormon Central since its inception, recounts how Hugh Nibley was a model to Kirk and his friends from his formative years to the present day.

Rappleye, Jasmin Gimenez. “A Conversation about Hugh Nibley with Shirley S. Ricks.” In Conversations about Hugh Nibley, by Jasmin Gimenez, Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, 8 April 2021. Video.

Part of a six-part video series called Conversations about Hugh Nibley.

Enjoy the inspiring untold stories of Hugh Nibley’s life and work in the new book Hugh Nibley Observed, available in hardcover, softcover, digital, and audio formats.

In this video, Shirley shares her firsthand experience as an editor for many of the nineteen volumes of the Collected Works of Hugh Nibley and as co-editor of Hugh Nibley Observed.

Rappleye, Jasmin Gimenez. “A Conversation about Hugh Nibley with Stephen T. Whitlock.” In Conversations about Hugh Nibley, by Jasmin Gimenez, Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, 8 April 2021. Video.

Part of a six-part video series called Conversations about Hugh Nibley.

Enjoy the inspiring untold stories of Hugh Nibley’s life and work in the new book Hugh Nibley Observed, available in hardcover, softcover, digital, and audio formats.

In this video, Steve, one of the editors of Hugh Nibley Observed, recounts how the idea for the book germinated and discusses why Hugh Nibley’s example as a scholar and a disciple is more relevant now than ever before.

Rappleye, Jasmin Gimenez. “Conversations about Hugh Nibley.” Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR. 2021.

A collection of conversations with various people about Hugh Nibley, his works, and his impact.

Reynolds, Noel B. “The Brass Plates Version of Genesis.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

Are there indirect evidences of distinctive contents of the brass plates? Can we learn anything about the plates and their contents through an examination of indirect textual evidence in the Book of Mormon?

Reynolds, Noel B. Review of Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life, by Boyd Jay Petersen. Utah Historical Quarterly 72, no. 1 (2004): 85–86.
Rhodes, Michael D. “Introduction.” In One Eternal Round, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 19. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2010.

One Eternal Round is the culmination of Hugh Nibley’s thought on the book of Abraham and represents over fifteen years of research and writing. The volume includes penetrating insights into Egyptian pharaohs and medieval Jewish and Islamic traditions about Abraham; Greek, Egyptian, and Mesopotamian myths; the Aztec calendar stone; Hopi Indian ceremonies; and early Jewish and Christian apocrypha, as well as the relationship of myth, ritual, and history.

Rhodes, Michael D. “Preface.” In One Eternal Round, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 19. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2010.

One Eternal Round is the culmination of Hugh Nibley’s thought on the book of Abraham and represents over fifteen years of research and writing. The volume includes penetrating insights into Egyptian pharaohs and medieval Jewish and Islamic traditions about Abraham; Greek, Egyptian, and Mesopotamian myths; the Aztec calendar stone; Hopi Indian ceremonies; and early Jewish and Christian apocrypha, as well as the relationship of myth, ritual, and history.

Rhodes, Michael D. “Nibley, Egyptology, and the Book of Abraham.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh W. Nibley (1910–2005) was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century, with wide-ranging interests in scripture, history, and social issues. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley comprise nineteen weighty volumes. But he was also one of the most enigmatic observers of the Church. In this volume readers will discover that the personal stories and perspectives behind the scholarship are sometimes even more captivating than his brilliant and witty intellectual breakthroughs. This comprehensive three-part collection of essays sheds fascinating new light on Hugh Nibley as a scholar and a man. Part 1, entitled “Portraits,” contains the first collection of observations—a “spiritual” portrait of Hugh Nibley by his close friend and colleague John W. “Jack” Welch, a description of the physical portrait by Rebecca Everett hanging in the Hugh Nibley Ancient Studies room at Brigham Young University, and a biographical portrait by Hugh himself. Part 2, “Nibley, the Scholar,” contains expanded and updated versions of the almost forgotten audio and video recordings of the BYU Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship lecture series celebrating the centennial of Nibley’s birth in 2010. An additional set of chapters on Nibley’s scholarship rounds out this collection. Part 3, “Nibley, the Man,” includes tributes given by family members and others at Nibley’s funeral service. A series of entertaining personal stories, reminiscences, and folklore accounts concludes the volume.

Ricks, Stephen D. “Foreword.” In Enoch the Prophet, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley 2, edited by Stephen D. Ricks. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 1986.
Ricks, Stephen D., and John M. Lundquist. By Study and Also By Faith, Volume 1. Provo, UT/Salt Lake City: FARMS/Deseret Book, 1990.

Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990.

Essays based on what people have learned from Hugh Nibley.

Ricks, Stephen D. “Foreword.” In The Ancient State: The Rulers and the Ruled, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 10. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 1990.

One important key to understanding modern civilization is a familiarity with its ancient background. Many modern principles and practices—social, political, and even economic—have clear parallels in antiquity. A careful study of these forerunners of our traditions, particularly as they contributed to the downfall of earlier civilizations, may help us avoid some of the mistakes of our predecessors. The Ancient State, by Hugh Nibley, is a thought-provoking examination of assorted aspects of ancient culture, from the use of marked arrows to the surprisingly universal conception of kinship, from arguments of various schools of philosophy to the rise of rhetoric. Author Hugh Nibley brings his usual meticulous research and scholarship to bear in this enlightening collection of essays and lectures. It has been said that only by learning the lessons of history can we hope to avoid repeating them. For scholar and novice alike, The Ancient State is a valuable source of such learning.

Ricks, Stephen D. “Hugh Nibley, Lehi in the Desert, The World of the Jaredites, There Were Jaredites.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): Article 19.

Since 1989, the Review of Books on the Book of Mormon has published review essays to help serious readers make informed choices and judgments about books and other publications on topics related to the Latter-day Saint religious tradition. It has also published substantial freestanding essays that made further contributions to the field of Mormon studies. In 1996, the journal changed its name to the FARMS Review with Volume 8, No 1. In 2011, the journal was renamed Mormon Studies Review.

A review of Lehi in the Desert, The World of the Jaredites, There Were Jaredites, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley vol. 5.

Porter, Bruce H., and Stephen D. Ricks. “Names in Antiquity: Old, New, and Hidden.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

Explores the connection between a name and the existence of the thing it refers to.

Ricks, Stephen D. Review of Lehi in the Desert, The World of the Jaredites, There Were Jaredites; An Approach to the Book of Mormon; Since Cumorah. Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): 128–42.
Ricks, Stephen D., and John M. Lundquist. By Study and Also By Faith, Volume 2. Provo, UT/Salt Lake City: FARMS/Deseret Book, 1990.

Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990.

Essays based on what people have learned from Hugh Nibley.

Luschin, Immo, Richard O. Cowan, Arthur D. Haycock, Robert L. Simpson, Hugh W. Nibley, and Stephen D. Ricks. “Temples.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism 4, edited by Daniel H. Ludlow. New York: Macmillan, 1992.

An encyclopedia of church terminology.

Explains various parts of the temples from temple worship, to the history of temples, to how members worship in the temples.

Ricks, Stephen D. “Foreword.” In Eloquent Witness: Nibley on Himself, Others, and the Temple Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 17. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2008.

One of the stunning aspects of Dr. Hugh Nibley’s genius was his persistent sense of wonder. That trait induced him to range widely through very disparate subjects of study—all covered in volume 17 of The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley on Himself, Others, and the Temple. In this compilation of materials, most of which have been published previously outside the Collected Works volumes, Nibley explores the ancient Egyptians, the temple, the life sciences, world literature, ancient Judaism, and Joseph Smith and the Restoration. The contents of this volume illustrate the breadth of his interest through autobiographical sketches, interviews, book reviews, forewords to books, letters, memorial tributes, Sunday School lessons, and various writings about the temple.

Ricks, Stephen D. “Reminiscences of Nibley.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh W. Nibley (1910–2005) was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century, with wide-ranging interests in scripture, history, and social issues. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley comprise nineteen weighty volumes. But he was also one of the most enigmatic observers of the Church. In this volume readers will discover that the personal stories and perspectives behind the scholarship are sometimes even more captivating than his brilliant and witty intellectual breakthroughs. This comprehensive three-part collection of essays sheds fascinating new light on Hugh Nibley as a scholar and a man. Part 1, entitled “Portraits,” contains the first collection of observations—a “spiritual” portrait of Hugh Nibley by his close friend and colleague John W. “Jack” Welch, a description of the physical portrait by Rebecca Everett hanging in the Hugh Nibley Ancient Studies room at Brigham Young University, and a biographical portrait by Hugh himself. Part 2, “Nibley, the Scholar,” contains expanded and updated versions of the almost forgotten audio and video recordings of the BYU Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship lecture series celebrating the centennial of Nibley’s birth in 2010. An additional set of chapters on Nibley’s scholarship rounds out this collection. Part 3, “Nibley, the Man,” includes tributes given by family members and others at Nibley’s funeral service. A series of entertaining personal stories, reminiscences, and folklore accounts concludes the volume.

Robertson-Wilson, Marian. “Which Came First, the Music or the Words? (A Greek Text and Coptic Melody: Musical Transcription and Analysis of the Setting).” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

A tribute to Dr. Hugh H. Nibley.

An expansion of a paper presented at the Third International Congress of Coptic Studies (Warsaw, Poland, 1984), which dealt with a Coptic melody that is performed at Easter time to two completely different texts. It is hoped that the following discussion will provide a clue as to the antiquity of the music in question.

Rogers, Thomas F. “Thoughts about Joseph Smith: Upon Reading Donna Hill’s Joseph Smith: The First Mormon.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

This paper first lists a number of personal experiences which are mentioned but not unduly emphasized in Donna Hill’s biography and which, taken together, appear to have been more than coincidental influences on the formulation of Latter-day Saint doctrine and Church practices.

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Sabin, Steve. “An (Almost) Uncensored Interview with Hugh Nibley.” Student Review, 24 March 1993, 3.

Student Review once managed to interview Hugh Nibley; one of his students performed the interview for us in his office some Saturday. The guy came up with all sorts of questions, and Hugh answered them all. We all listened to the tape several times over; it was cool stuff. We ran it as “An (Almost) Uncensored Interview with Hugh Nibley,” from which my favorite line was a comment he made when asked about the BYU administration (as it existed circa 1994): “Lawyers! Lawyers everywhere! Nothing but lawyers!” Also, he called Supreme Court Justice Scalia “just plain stupid.” (from a comment at TimesandSeasons.org)

Salmon, Douglas F. “Parallelomania and the Study of Latter-day Scripture: Confirmation, Coincidence, or the Collective Unconscious?” Salmon, Douglas F.

Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought is an independent quarterly established to express Mormon culture and to examine the relevance of religion to secular life.

This article looks at some of the ways parallels have been used by Nibley in the exposition of latter-day scripture, the types of parallels employed, and some of the problems that arise from this comparative exercise.

Schlinker, Lori. “Kitsch in the Visual Arts and Advertisement of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.” Interview #6, in Lori Schlinker’s master’s thesis, 60-64. Provo, UT: Brigham Young University, 1971.

Kitsch in the Visual Arts [an interview in Lori Schlinker’s “Kitsch in the Visual Arts” (BYU, August 1971), 60–64; augmented by the inclusion of some miscellaneous comments made by Nibley in a panel discussion on the arts in Letters to Smoother, Etc. . . . Proceedings of the 1980 Brigham Young University Symposium on the Humanities, ed. Joy C. Ross and Steven C. Walker (Provo, UT: BYU Press, 1982), 102–4; 111–12]

The writer’s reason for making this study is a felt lack of taste and a general misunderstanding and misuse of the visual arts in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. She is convinced that art, generally considered as a matter of personal taste, is actually a matter of professional judgement. A characteristic of our time is the “do-it-yourself“ trend and to make up ones own mind about everything without any consultation of authorities and also a loss of feeling for integrity in productions of the human mind and hand which broke down the fences against kitsch and opened up the way, not only into man’s environment, but also into his thinking. May the reader find in this study a help towards a better understanding and a greater awareness of the problem of kitsch.

Schmuhl, Emily. “Hugh Nibley: A Scholar from Early Age.” Mormon Times, 29 January 2010.

This article can now be found in the Deseret News archives.

Hugh Nibley’s daughter reflects on Bro. Nibley’s early life and the beginning of his scholarly endeavors.

Schramm, Clarence F. Review of Brother Brigham Challenges the Saints. BYU Studies 34, no. 4 (1994–1995): 213–5.
Seely, David Rolph. “Hugh W. Nibley, Teachings of the Book of Mormon: Semester 3.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 5 (1993): Article 35.

Available for free at BYU ScholarsArchive.

A review of Teachings of the Book of Mormon: Sememster 3 (1992), by Hugh W. Nibley.

Seely, David Rolph. Review of Teachings of the Book of Mormon: Semester Three Transcripts. Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 5, no. 1 (1993): 190–7.
Seely, David Rolph. “Book Notice — Hugh Nibley Observed.” BYU Studies Quarterly 60:2 (2021): 239-40.
Seely, David Rolph. “Remembering Hugh Nibley as a Scholar and, More Importantly, as a Man: Observing the Faith of the Observer.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 45 (2021): 241-250.

This is a tribute written by a former student.

“Those who knew Brother Nibley best knew he was a remarkable man of both depth and breadth. This new volume plumbs both that depth and breadth in the recounting of personal stories and colorful history. This

volume is a welcome addition to any library.“

Luschin, Immo, Richard O. Cowan, Arthur D. Haycock, Robert L. Simpson, Hugh W. Nibley, and Stephen D. Ricks. “Temples.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism 4, edited by Daniel H. Ludlow. New York: Macmillan, 1992.

An encyclopedia of church terminology.

Explains various parts of the temples from temple worship, to the history of temples, to how members worship in the temples.

Smith, Joseph Fielding. “Preface to the First Edition.” In An Approach to the Book of Mormon, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 6, 3rd ed. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 1988.

In this work the Book of Mormon is seen in a new perspective; we see it in a world setting, not in a mere local one. It takes its place naturally alongside the Bible and other great works of antiquity and becomes one of them.

An introduction to the first edition of An Approach to the Book of Mormon by Hugh Nibley.

Sorenson, John L. “The Composition of Lehi’s Family.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

A microanthropological examination of what the text reveals regarding the composition and demography of Lehi’s party from the beginning of their sojourn in the Arabian wilderness to their arrival in the promised land.

Stack, Peggy Fletcher, and Mark Eddington. “LDS Historian Nibley Dies at 94.” Salt Lake Tribune, 25 February 2005.

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2005, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Praise for Hugh Nibley and some details about his life.

Stecker, Alexander T. Review of Since Cumorah: The Book of Mormon in the Modern World, by Hugh Nibley. BYU Studies 8, no. 4 (1968): 465–68.
Stoker, Kevin. “Truth Stimulates Gospel Scholar.” Stoker, Kevin.

A look into Hugh Nibley’s path toward becoming a scholar and teacher.

Swenson, Jason. “Beloved Church Scholar Celebrates 90th.” Church News, 1 April 2000.

A tribute to Hugh Nibley around his 90th birthday.

T, U

Tate, George S. “Utopia and Garden: The Relationship of Candide to Laxness’s Paradísarheimt.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

Thiessen, Mark. “Noted LDS Historian Hugh Nibley Dead at 94.” Deseret News, 24 February 2005.

A brief overview of Hugh Nibley’s life as a tribute after his death.

Thomas, Robert K. “The Influence of Hugh Nibley: His Presence in the University.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

Reprinted in the Journal of Book of Mormon Studies (1997) and Hugh Nibley Observed (2021).

An analysis of Hugh Nibley’s contributions and influence on historians and scriptural scholars.

Thomas, Robert K. “The Influence of Hugh Nibley: His Presence in the University.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6, no. 2 (1997): 1–25.

Reprinted in Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life, 2002, 245–59. Presented in honor of Hugh Nibley’s sixty-fifth birthday in the Varsity Theater, Brigham Young University, in connection with the 1975 Annual Welch Lecture Series by Klaus Baer and others.

An analysis of Hugh Nibley’s contributions and influence on historians and scriptural scholars.

Thomas, Robert K. “The Influence of Hugh Nibley: His Presence in the University.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Originally published in By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990 vol. 1.

An analysis of Hugh Nibley’s contributions and influence on historians and scriptural scholars.

Thomasson, Gordon C. “Togetherness Is Sharing an Umbrella: Divine Kingship, the Gnosis, and Religious Syncretism.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

Thomasson, Gordon C. “Matthew Black and Mircea Eliade Meet Hugh Nibley.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

Hugh W. Nibley (1910–2005) was arguably the most brilliant Latter-day Saint scholar of the 20th century, with wide-ranging interests in scripture, history, and social issues. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley comprise nineteen weighty volumes. But he was also one of the most enigmatic observers of the Church. In this volume readers will discover that the personal stories and perspectives behind the scholarship are sometimes even more captivating than his brilliant and witty intellectual breakthroughs. This comprehensive three-part collection of essays sheds fascinating new light on Hugh Nibley as a scholar and a man. Part 1, entitled “Portraits,” contains the first collection of observations—a “spiritual” portrait of Hugh Nibley by his close friend and colleague John W. “Jack” Welch, a description of the physical portrait by Rebecca Everett hanging in the Hugh Nibley Ancient Studies room at Brigham Young University, and a biographical portrait by Hugh himself. Part 2, “Nibley, the Scholar,” contains expanded and updated versions of the almost forgotten audio and video recordings of the BYU Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship lecture series celebrating the centennial of Nibley’s birth in 2010. An additional set of chapters on Nibley’s scholarship rounds out this collection. Part 3, “Nibley, the Man,” includes tributes given by family members and others at Nibley’s funeral service. A series of entertaining personal stories, reminiscences, and folklore accounts concludes the volume.

As a graduate student, Gordon Thomasson had the opportunity to introduce two internationally renowned scholars to the publications and scholarship of Hugh Nibley: Matthew Black, an eminent scholar of ancient Enoch writings; and Mircea Eliade, famed chair of the History of Religions program at the University of Chicago. Upon hearing of Nibley’s Enoch discoveries, Black made an immediate, impromptu visit to BYU to meet him. Upon reading one of Nibley’s studies, Eliade proposed hiring him on the spot, exclaiming, “He knows my field better than I do, and his translations are elegant!”

Green, Doyle L., and Jay M. Todd. “The Ancient Land of Egypt.” Green, Doyle L. and Jay M. Todd.

Includes color photographs taken by the author.

Articles introducing Egypt accompanying Nibley’s series “A New Look at the Pearl of Great Price.”

Towne, Julie A. “Hugh Nibley Dies, Leaving Scholarly Legacy.” Daily Universe, 25 February 2005.

A reflection on Hugh Nibley’s contributions to scholarship, as well as a look into some of his other accomplishments.

Tvedtnes, John A. “Hugh Nibley, Since Cumorah.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): Article 22.

Since 1989, the Review of Books on the Book of Mormon has published review essays to help serious readers make informed choices and judgments about books and other publications on topics related to the Latter-day Saint religious tradition. It has also published substantial freestanding essays that made further contributions to the field of Mormon studies. In 1996, the journal changed its name to the FARMS Review with Volume 8, No 1. In 2011, the journal was renamed Mormon Studies Review.

A review of Since Cumorah, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley vol. 7.

Tvedtnes, John A. “Hugh Nibley, Since Cumorah.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2, no. 1 (1990): 175-181.

Available for free at BYU ScholarsArchive.

A review of Since Cumorah, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley vol. 7.

Tvedtnes, John A. Review of Since Cumorah. Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): 175–81.
Tvedtnes, John A. “King Benjamin and the Feast of Tabernacles.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This second of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the authors have learned from Nibley. Nearly every major subject that Dr. Nibley has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the sacrament covenant in Third Nephi, the Lamanite view of Book of Mormon history, external evidences of the Book of Mormon, proper names in the Book of Mormon, the brass plates version of Genesis, the composition of Lehi’s family, ancient burials of metal documents in stone boxes, repentance as rethinking, Mormon history’s encounter with secular modernity, and Judaism in the 20th century.

Similarities between King Mosiah’s coronation and ancient Middle Eastern coronation rites.

V

VanDam, Marvin R. “Inside the Brilliant Mind of Hugh Nibley.” LDS Living Magazine, 13 August 2014.

How Hugh Nibley should be remembered by rising generations.

W-Z