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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0 — 9
Skousen, Royal. “A theory! A theory! We have already got a theory, and there cannot be any more…” Paper presented at the 2015 Exploring the Complexities in the English Language of the Book of Mormon Conference. March 14, 2015.
Interpreter Foundation. “A. Jane Birch is 2014 Winner of The Ruth M. Stephens Article Prize.” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 23, 2014.
Hamblin, Laura. “A.M. Revelation.” BYU Studies 28, no. 2 (1988): 28.
Hoskisson, Paul Y. “Aaron's Golden Calf.” The FARMS Review 18, no. 1 (2006): Article 18.

This article provides insights on the story of Aaron and the golden calf in the Bible, explaining why Aaron may have decided to make it and why his punishment for doing so was minor in comparison to other biblical reprimands.

Brandt, Edward J. “Aaron, Brother of Moses.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism, ed. Daniel H. Ludlow. 1:1 New York: Macmillan, 1992.
Wirthlin, Joseph L. “The Aaronic Priesthood.” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1960.
Packer, Boyd K. “The Aaronic Priesthood.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1981.
Oaks, Dallin H. “The Aaronic Priesthood and the Sacrament.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1998.

Those who hold the Aaronic Priesthood open the door for all Church members who worthily partake of the sacrament to enjoy the companionship of the Spirit of the Lord and the ministering of angels.

Brown, Victor L., Jr. “The Aaronic Priesthood MIA.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1973.
Monson, Thomas S. “The Aaronic Priesthood Pathway.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1984.
Vandenberg, John H. “Aaronic Priesthood Responsibility.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1962.
Brown, Victor L., Jr. “Aaronic Priesthood Stewardship.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1974.
Buehner, Carl W. “The Aaronic Priesthood, Its Powers and Blessings.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1958.
Ochoa, Adrián. “Aaronic Priesthood: Arise and Use the Power of God.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2012.

The priesthood needs to be exercised to accomplish any good. You are called to “arise and shine forth,” not to hide your light in darkness.

Ballantyne, VerDon W. “Aaronic Priesthood: Powers and Offices.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism, ed. Daniel H. Ludlow. 1:1–3 New York: Macmillan, 1992.
Hales, Robert D. “The Aaronic Priesthood: Return with Honor.” Delivered at the General Priesthood Meeting of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1990.
Hinckley, Gordon B. “The Aaronic Priesthood—a Gift from God.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1988.
Brown, Victor L., Jr. “The Aaronic Priesthood—A Sure Foundation.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1972.
Christensen, A. Sherman. “The Abalone Shell.” BYU Studies 35, no. 3 (1995): 132.
Reed, Michael G. “Abanes’s ‘Revised’ History.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 1 (2004): Article 8.

Review of Richard Abanes. One Nation under Gods: A History of the Mormon Church.

BYU Studies Staff. “Abbreviations.” BYU Studies 34, no. 3 (1995): 0.
Bennion, Steven D. “Abel.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism, ed. Daniel H. Ludlow. 1:5 New York: Macmillan, 1992.
Card, Orson Scott. “Abel, Cain.” Brigham Young University Studies 21, no. 1 (1981): 36.
Holland, Jeffrey R. “‘Abide in Me’” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2004.

For the fruit of the gospel to blossom and bless our lives, we must be firmly attached to Him, the Savior of us all.

Christofferson, D. Todd. “‘Abide in My Love’” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 2016.

God’s love is infinite and it will endure forever, but what it means for each of us depends on how we respond to His love.

Soares, Ulisses. “Abide in the Lord’s Territory!” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2012.

Our daily question must be, “Do my actions place me in the Lord’s or in the enemy’s territory?”

Marriott, Neill F. “Abiding in God and Repairing the Breach.” Delivered at the General Women’s Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 2017.

Christ has the power to bring us into loving fellowship with the Father and with one another.

LDS Perspectives [pseud. of Laura Harris Hales]. “Abinadi with Shon Hopkin.” The Interpreter Foundation website. February 28, 2018.
Smith, Andrew C. “Abinadi: A Minor Prophet, A Major Contributor.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 28 (2018): 261-272.

Abstract: The new edited volume Abinadi: He Came Among Them in Disguise, from the Book of Mormon Academy, is a valuable contribution to Book of Mormon studies. It should find a wide audience and stimulate greater and deeper thinking about the pivotal contributions of Abinadi to the Book of Mormon. It should, however, not be considered the end of the conversation. This review discusses the volume’s importance within Book of Mormon scholarship generally. It also highlights certain valuable contributions from each of the authors, and points out places where more can be said and deeper analysis is needed.

Review of Shon D. Hopkin, ed. Abinadi: He Came Among Them in Disguise (Provo and Salt Lake City, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, and Deseret Book, 2018), 404 pp. $27.99.

Rappleye, Neal. “Abinadi: He Came among Them in Disguise.” BYU Studies Quarterly 57, no. 4 (2018): 219.
Parker, Todd. “Abinadi: The Man and the Message.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1996. Transcript of a lecture given at the FARMS Book of Mormon Lecture Series.

Todd Parker discusses the meaning of Abinadi’s name and compares his circumstances to those of John the Baptist and his message to that of King Benjamin. He points out legal pretexts for Abinadi’s trial from Old Testament passages, and demonstrates how the priests of King Noah misunderstood the function of prophecy. Abinadi provides several examples of types and shadows pointing to the mission of Christ.

Keywords: Book of Mormon, Christ
Jensen, Robin Scott. “Abner Cole and The Reflector: Another Clue to the Timing of the 1830 Book of Mormon Printing.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 24 no. 1 (2015).
Bradshaw, Jeffrey M. “‘Abound in Hope’ — Stories of the Saints in the DR Congo, Part 6.” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 8, 2018.
Renlund, Dale G. “Abound with Blessings.” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2019.

Most blessings that God desires to give us require action on our part—action based on our faith in Jesus Christ.

Walker, Ronald W. “About the Author.” BYU Studies 43, no. 1 (2004): 302.
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “About the Contributors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 1 no. 1 (1992).
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “About the Contributors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2 no. 1 (1993).
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “About the Contributors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2 no. 2 (1993).
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “About the Contributors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 3 no. 2 (1994).
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “About the Contributors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 3 no. 1 (1994).
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “About the Contributors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 4 no. 2 (1995).
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “About the Contributors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 5 no. 1 (1996).
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “About the Contributors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 5 no. 2 (1996).
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “About the Contributors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6 no. 1 (1997).
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “About the Contributors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6 no. 2 (1997).
Everett, Rebecca Fechser. “About the Portrait of Hugh Nibley.” In Hugh Nibley Observed, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, Shirley S. Ricks, and Stephen T. Whitlock. Orem, UT, and Salt Lake City: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2021.

An essay written about a painted portrait of Hugh Nibley.

Skousen, Royal. About this Online Edition of Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2014.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

ATV appears in six books and gives a complete analysis of all the important cases of textual variation

(or potential variation) in the history of the Book of Mormon. It starts out with the title page of the Book

of Mormon and the two witness statements, then turns to 1 Nephi and continues through the Book of

Mormon to the end of Moroni.

Gee, John. “Abracadabra, Isaac and Jacob.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 7, no. 1 (1995): Article 6.

Review of The Use of Egyptian Magical Papyri to Authenticate the Book of Abraham: A Critical Review? (1993), by Edward H. Ashment.

Clark, E. Douglas. “Abraham.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism, ed. Daniel H. Ludlow. 1:7–9 New York: Macmillan, 1992.
Nibley, Hugh W. “Abraham.” Lecture given on 14 June 1995, LDS Institute, Utah Valley State College.
Gee, John. “Abraham and Idrimi.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 22 no. 1 (2013).

Idrimi of Alalakh lived in Syria about a century after Abraham and left an autobiographical inscription that is the only such item uncovered archaeologically from Middle Bronze Age Syro-Palestine. The inscription of Idrimi and the Book of Abraham share a number of parallel features and motifs. Some of the parallels are a result of similar experiences in their lives and some are a result of coming from a similar culture and time.

Larsen, David J. “Abraham and Jehovah.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 23, 2014.
Nibley, Hugh W. “Abraham and the Great Year-Rite.” Nibley, Hugh and Michael D. Rhodes.

One Eternal Round is the culmination of Hugh Nibley’s thought on the book of Abraham and represents over fifteen years of research and writing. The volume includes penetrating insights into Egyptian pharaohs and medieval Jewish and Islamic traditions about Abraham; Greek, Egyptian, and Mesopotamian myths; the Aztec calendar stone; Hopi Indian ceremonies; and early Jewish and Christian apocrypha, as well as the relationship of myth, ritual, and history.

This chapter helps to distinguish between myth, ritual, and history, especially as they connect with Egyptian annual year-rites.

Swift, Hales. “Abraham as Father of All the Faithful.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 6, 2019.
Toronto, James A. “Abraham Divided: An LDS Perspective on the Middle East.” BYU Studies 34, no. 1 (1994): 103.
Nibley, Hugh W. Abraham in Egypt. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1981. xi + 288 pp.

Republished in 2000 in a second edition with new materials and illustrations as Abraham in Egypt, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley vol. 14.

Nibley examines the Book of Abraham’s striking connections with ancient texts and Egyptian religion and culture.

See also: Abraham in Egypt (2000)
Nibley, Hugh W. Abraham in Egypt. The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley 14. Edited by Gary P. Gillum. Illustrations directed by Michael P. Lyon. 2nd ed. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2000. xxxiii + 705 pp.

Considered by many to be a classic in LDS literature, this new edition of Abraham in Egypt [published in association with the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies (FARMS)] contains all the material from the first edition as well as additions from Nibley’s 1968–70 Improvement Era series “A New Look at the Pearl of Great Price.”

In 1968–70, Hugh Nibley wrote a series of articles for the Improvement Era titled “A New Look at the Pearl of Great Price.” Brother Nibley asked that some of these articles be made into chapters to be added to Abraham in Egypt. These new chapters are what constitutes the new edition; no changes were made to the original chapters. For the articles, Nibley drew from many Jewish and rabbinical sources, while his work in the first edition was based on Egyptian material.

See also: Abraham in Egypt (1981)
Mackay, Thomas W. “Abraham in Egypt: A Collation of Evidence for the Case of the Missing Wife.” Brigham Young University Studies 10, no. 4 (1970): 429.
Ostler, Blake T. “Abraham: An Egyptian Connection.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1981.

Blake Ostler examines what relationship exists between the papyri of the ancient Egyptian Book of Breathings possessed by Joseph Smith and the Book of Abraham. Ostler finds that Joseph Smith, in associating vignettes of the Book of the Dead to explain Abraham’s experiences, was actually duplicating an ancient practice about which he could not have known from secular sources available in his day.

Keywords: Pearl of Great Price; Book of Abraham
Brown, L. Edward. “The Abrahamic Covenant and Modern Israel.” In A Symposium on the Old Testament, 24–26. Salt Lake City: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1983.
Tvedtnes, John A. “Abrahamic Lore in Support of the Book of Abraham.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1999. Transcript of a lecture presented on 10 March 1999 as part of the FARMS Book of Abraham Lecture Series.

Stories about Abraham circulated in ancient times and were continued into the medieval period. Many of these accounts were then lost and have come to light only recently. John Tvedtnes examines several such stories— ranging from creation accounts to the attempted sacrifice of Abraham— and shows how they support the Book of Abraham.

Dahl, Larry E. “The Abrahamic Test.” In A Witness of Jesus Christ: The 1989 Sperry Symposium on the Old Testament, ed. Richard D. Draper. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1990: 53–67.
Spendlove, Loren Blake. “Abraham’s Amen and Believing in Christ: Possible Applications in the Book of Mormon Text.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 49 (2021): 37-62.

Abstract: Following the discovery of delocutive verbs and their likely usage in the Hebrew Bible, Meredith Kline proposed that the verb האמין (he’emin) in Genesis 15:6 — traditionally interpreted as a denominative verb meaning “he believed” — should be understood as a delocutive verb meaning “he declared ‘amen.’” Rather than reading Genesis 15:6 as a passive statement — Abraham believed in Yahweh — Kline argued that we should interpret this verse in the active sense, that Abraham vocally declared his amen in Yahweh’s covenantal promise. In this light, I have analyzed various passages in the Book of Mormon that utilize similar verbiage — “believe in Christ,” for example — to examine how their meanings might be enhanced by interpreting the verbs as delocutives rather than denominatives.

Nibley, Hugh W. “Abraham’s Creation Drama.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1999. Transcript of a lecture presented on 6 April 1999 as part of the FARMS Book of Abraham Lecture Series.

Hugh Nibley discusses how Abraham was an ordinary man who held no office and worked no miracles, and yet he was one of the greatest minds of the last forty centuries. Nibley discusses Abraham’s relationship with the temple and gives an overview of the ancient temple. He also shows how the Book of Abraham answers what Nibley calls the “terrible questions”: Where do I come from? Why am I here? How does the universe figure in the gospel? How did it all begin, and how will it all end? Nibley argues that the vision given to Abraham in the Book of Abraham contains stage directions indicating that the vision is dramatized, and the Book of Abraham includes the script.

Keywords: Pearl of Great Price, Abraham
Nibley, Hugh W. “Abraham’s Creation Drama.” Talk given on 6 April 1999, Joseph Smith Building auditorium, Brigham Young University, and later at the Assembly Hall on Temple Square in Salt Lake City, as part of the Book of Abraham Lecture Series sponsored by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.

Transcript of a lecture presented on 6 April 1999 as part of the FARMS Book of Abraham Lecture Series.

Hugh Nibley discusses how Abraham was an ordinary man who held no office and worked no miracles, and yet he was one of the greatest minds of the last forty centuries.

Nibley, Hugh W. “Abraham’s Temple Drama.” In The Temple in Time and Eternity, edited by Donald W. Parry and Stephen D. Ricks, 1–42. Provo, UT: FARMS, 1999.

Reprinted in Eloquent Witness: Nibley on Himself, Others, and the Temple, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley vol. 17, 445–82.

Here, Nibley identifies elements of the creation drama that appear in the book of Abraham and elsewhere in the ancient world.

Nibley, Hugh W. “Abraham’s Temple Drama.” In Eloquent Witness: Nibley on Himself, Others, and the Temple Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 17. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2008.

One of the stunning aspects of Dr. Hugh Nibley’s genius was his persistent sense of wonder. That trait induced him to range widely through very disparate subjects of study—all covered in volume 17 of The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley on Himself, Others, and the Temple. In this compilation of materials, most of which have been published previously outside the Collected Works volumes, Nibley explores the ancient Egyptians, the temple, the life sciences, world literature, ancient Judaism, and Joseph Smith and the Restoration. The contents of this volume illustrate the breadth of his interest through autobiographical sketches, interviews, book reviews, forewords to books, letters, memorial tributes, Sunday School lessons, and various writings about the temple.

Here, Nibley identifies elements of the creation drama that appear in the book of Abraham and elsewhere in the ancient world.

Farrell, Heather. “Abraham’s Tent.” BYU Studies 47, no. 4 (2008): 93.
Olsen, Steven L. “Abridging the Records of the Zoramite Mission: Mormon as Historian.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 52 (2022): 183-190.

Abstract: Since the mid-twentieth century, scholarly studies of the literary craftsmanship of biblical texts have revealed considerable insights into the intended purposes of the authors of these scriptural narratives. The present study applies the analytical methods of these studies to Mormon’s abridgment of Alma’s records of the Zoramite mission (Alma 31–35), revealing intricate patterns of literary conventions ranging from the most specific (e.g., diction, syntax, and figures of speech) to the most general (e.g., rhetoric, tone, and structural logic). From this perspective, Alma 31 provides a framework to distinguish Nephite and Zoramite religious practices and structure the narrative of the entire Zoramite mission, including the missionaries’ teachings. More broadly, Mormon’s account of the Zoramite mission sets the stage for the general degradation of Nephite society that focuses his abridgment of Nephi’s Large Plates for the next one hundred years.

[Editor’s Note: This article provides a good example of using literary analysis to enhance understanding of the scriptures. While it was previously published, it has not been widely accessible, and thus we have chosen to republish it to bring it to the attention of readers. It was first presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Mormon Letters, 25 January 1992, at Westminster College in Salt Lake City. An abridged and edited version was later published as “Patterns of Prayer: Humility or Pride,” Ensign 22, no. 8 (August 1992), 8–11, https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/ensign/1992/08/patterns-of-prayer-humility-or-pride. The original presentation was included in The Association for Mormon Letters Annual 1994, 212–15. The article is reprinted here with the permission of the author, with minor edits.]

Keywords: Book of Mormon, literary analysis, reprint, Zoramites
Greenspahn, Frederick E. “Abstract of Y. Koler ‘Noah’” Old Testament Abstracts 6, no. 483 (1983): 148.
Faust, James E. “The Abundant Life.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1985.
Wirthlin, Joseph B. “The Abundant Life.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2006.

The abundant life is within our reach if only we will drink deeply of living water, fill our hearts with love, and create of our lives a masterpiece.

Poll, Richard D. “An Abundant Life: The Memoirs of Hugh B. Brown.” BYU Studies 28, no. 3 (1988): 120.
Cannon, George Q. “The Abundant Testimonies to the Work of God, Etc.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 22. 1882, 252–259.

Discourse by President George Q. Cannon, delivered in the Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Sunday Afternoon, September 18, 1881. Reported By: John Irvine.

Monson, Thomas S. “Abundantly Blessed.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2008.

Our testimonies have been strengthened. I believe we are all the more determined to live the principles of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Brinton, Bonnie. “The Academic Anablep.” BYU Studies 49, no. 2 (2010): 25.
Slife, Brent D. “Academic Freedom at BYU from the Perspective of Someone Who Is Not a Latter-day Saint.” BYU Studies 49, no. 2 (2010): 21.
Thomas, Robert K. “Academic Responsibility.” Brigham Young University Studies 11, no. 3 (1971): 293.
Interpreter Foundation. “The Academy for Temple Studies Announces a Book Review Section.” The Interpreter Foundation website. May 23, 2013.
Christiansen, ElRay L. “Acceptance of a Call.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1951.
Richards, A. LeGrand. “Acceptance of Call to Council of the Twelve.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1952.
Nibley, Hugh W. “Acclamatio (Never Cry Mob).” In Toward a Humanistic Science of Politics: Essays in Honor of Francis Dunham Wormuth, edited by Dalmas H. Nelson and Richard L. Sklar, 11–22. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1983.

Hugh Nibley read a paper with the title “Acclamatio” at the annual meeting of the Southwest Archaeological Foundation in San Diego, California, in 1941.

In this essay, Nibley draws on materials he collected at the beginning of his career on the politics of ancient mobs and draws parallels with contemporary events, including anti-Mormon sentiments.

Nibley, Hugh W. “Acclamatio: (Never Cry Mob).” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1985.
Nibley, Hugh W. “Accommodating Religion to Your Life Style.” 27pp. Lecture given in the Religion in Life series.

This paper includes many quotations from Brigham Young and the scriptures.

Peterson, Paul H. “Accommodating the Saints at General Conference.” BYU Studies 41, no. 2 (2002): 4.
Dyer, Alvin R. “Accomplish the Work of the Lord.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1961.
Romney, Marion G. “According to the Covenants.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1975.
Maxwell, Neal A. “‘According to the Desire of [Our] Hearts’” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1996.
Wright, Mark Alan. “‘According to Their Language, unto Their Understanding’: The Cultural Context of Hierophanies and Theophanies in Latter-day Saint Canon.” Studies in the Bible and Antiquity 3 no. 1 (2011).

The prophet Nephi declared that the Lord speaks to his people “according to their language, unto their understanding” (2 Nephi 31:3). Religious beliefs are an integral part of a culture’s shared “language,” and the ways in which individuals interpret supernatural manifestations is typically mediated through their cultural background. The hierophanies recorded in Latter-day Saint canon directly reflect the unique cultural background of the individuals who witnessed them. This paper analyzes several distinct hierophanies witnessed by prophets in both the Old and New Worlds and discusses the cultural context in which such manifestations occur, which aids modern readers in obtaining a greater understanding of the revelatory process recounted in these texts.

Lyon, T. Edgar. “The Account Books of the Amos Davis Store at Commerce, Illinois.” Brigham Young University Studies 19, no. 2 (1979): 241.
Smith, George Albert. “An Account of His Journey to Palestine.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 16. 1874, 87–102.

Remarks by President George A. Smith, delivered in the New Tabernacle, Salt Like City, Sunday Afternoon, June 22, 1873. Reported By: David W. Evans.

Jones, Helen Walker. “Accountable Emily.” Brigham Young University Studies 22, no. 1 (1982): 46.
Wirthlin, Joseph L. “Achievements from Following Counsel.” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1947.
Hill, Marvin S., C. Keith Rooker, and Larry T. Wimmer. “Acknowledgements.” Brigham Young University Studies 17, no. 4 (1977): 389.
Forste, Renata T. “Acknowledging Differences While Avoiding Contention.” BYU Studies 49, no. 2 (2010): 38.
Lee, George P. “‘Acquaint Thyself with Him, and Be at Peace’” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1980.
Peterson, H. Burke. “Acquiring and Managing Production Projects.” Delivered at the Welfare Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1976.
Murphy, John M. “Acquiring and Preserving Written Records: A Sacred Commission.” The FARMS Review 19, no. 2 (2007): Article 8.

This article discusses the importance of recording sacred experiences and preserving other written records.

Scott, Richard G. “Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1993.
Book of Mormon Central. “Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge: Act in Faith.” The Book of Mormon Central website. KnoWhy #260. January 11, 2017.
Keywords: Faith;Jesus Christ;Prayer;Holy Ghost;Revelation;Nephi;Laman;Lemuel;Zeezrom;Lamoni;King Lamoni;Alma;Aaron;Nephites;Lamanites;Liahona;Lehi;Covenants
Aston, Warren P. “Across Arabia with Lehi and Sariah: ‘Truth Shall Spring out of the Earth’” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 15 no. 2 (2006).

Utilizing techniques adapted from literary criticism, this paper investigates the narrative structure of the Book of Mormon, particularly the relationship between Nephi’s first-person account and Mormon’s third-person abridgment. A comparison of the order and relative prominence of material from 1 Nephi 12 with the content of Mormon’s historical record reveals that Mormon may have intentionally patterned the structure of his narrative after Nephi’s prophetic vision—a conclusion hinted at by Mormon himself in his editorial comments. With this understanding, readers of the Book of Mormon can see how Mormon’s sometimes unusual editorial decisions are actually guided by an overarching desire to show that Nephi’s prophecies have been dramatically and literally fulfilled in the history of his people.

Eyring, Henry B. “Act in All Diligence.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2010.

We are to learn our duty from the Lord, and then we are to act in all diligence, never being lazy or slothful.

Faust, James E. “Acting for Ourselves and Not Being Acted Upon.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1995.
Snow, Lorenzo. “Acting in the Name of the Lord.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 13. 1871, 253–259.

Remarks by Elder Lorenzo Snow, delivered in the New Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Oct. 9, 1869. Reported By: John Grimshaw.

Ashton, Marvin J. “Action.” Delivered at the Friday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1970.
Cannon, George Q. “Actions Should Harmonize With Professions—‘Mormonism’ a System of Power—All the Faithful Are Entitled to Revelation—Leading Men But As Instruments in the Hands of God.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 19. 1878, 107–111.

Discourse by Elder George Q. Cannon, delivered in the New Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Sept. 23, 1877. Reported By: Rudger Clawson.

Pingel, C. Frederick. “Activating Young Men of the Aaronic Priesthood.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1982.
Swenson, Sharon. “Active Spectatorship: Spiritual Dimensions of Film.” BYU Studies 46, no. 2 (2007): 247.
Halverson, Taylor. “Acts 10-15. Continuing Revelation.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 14, 2015.
Halverson, Taylor. “Acts 21-28. Faithfully Witness of Christ.” The Interpreter Foundation website. October 10, 2015.
BYU Studies Staff. “Acts–Revelation Bibliography by Author.” BYU Studies 34, no. 3 (1995): 110.
BYU Studies Staff. “Acts–Revelation Bibliography by Category.” BYU Studies 34, no. 3 (1995): 89.
LDS Perspectives [pseud. of Laura Harris Hales]. “Adam Clarke’s Influence on Joseph Smith with Thomas A. Wayment.” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 27, 2017.
Roper, Matthew. “Adam in Ancient Texts and the Restoration.” On FAIR, https://www.fairlatterdaysaints.org. From the 2006 FairMormon Conference.
Callender, Dexter E. Adam in Myth and History: Ancient Israelite Perspectives on the Primal Human. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2000.
Dahl, Larry E. “Adam in the Premortal Life.” In The Man Adam, ed. Joseph Fielding McConkie and Robert L. Millet, 1–10. Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1990.
Smith, Robert F. “Adam Miller’s New Hermeneutic?” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 6 (2013): 1-7.

Review of Adam S. Miller (Collin College, McKinney, TX). Rube Goldberg Machines: Essays in Mormon Theology. Foreword by Richard Lyman Bushman. Draper, UT: Greg Kofford Books, 2012. 162 pp., with bibliography and indexes. $18.95. Paperback and e-book formats.

Brandt, Edward J. “Adam to Malachi: Where Do the Books Fit In?” Ensign 20 (Jan. 1990): 36–37.

Chart

Hafen, Bruce C., and Marie K. Hafen. “Adam, Eve, the Book of Moses, and the Temple: The Story of Receiving Christ’s Atonement.” Presented at the conference entitled “Tracing Ancient Threads of the Book of Moses” (September 18–19, 2020), Provo, UT: Brigham Young University 2020.
Hafen, Bruce C., and Marie K. Hafen. “Adam, Eve, the Book of Moses, and the Temple: The Story of Receiving Christ’s Atonement.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 46 (2021): 157-200.

Abstract: The authors begin by highlighting the importance of Book of Moses research that has discovered plausible findings for its historicity, rendering it at least reasonable to give the benefit of the doubt to sacred premises — even if, ultimately, the choice of premises is just that, a choice. Emphasizing the relevance of the Book of Moses to the temple, they note that the Book of Moses is not only an ancient temple text, but also the ideal scriptural context for a modern temple preparation course. Going further, the authors address an important question raised by some who have asked: “Since Christ is at the center of the gospel, why doesn’t the temple endowment teach the story of the life of Christ? What’s all this about Adam and Eve?” The answer given in detail in the paper is as follows: “The story of the life of Christ is the story of giving the Atonement. And the story of Adam and Eve is the story of receiving the Atonement. Their story is our story, too.”

[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the Latter-day Saint community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.

See Bruce C. Hafen and Marie K. Hafen, “Adam, Eve, the Book of Moses, and the Temple: The Story of Receiving Christ’s Atonement,” in Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Springville, UT: Book of Mormon Central; Redding, CA: FAIR; Tooele, UT: Eborn Books, 2021), page numbers forthcoming. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/ancient-threads-in-the-book-of-moses/.]Historicity and Plausibility of the Book of Moses.

Hafen, Bruce C., and Marie K. Hafen. “Adam, Eve, the Book of Moses, and the Temple: The Story of Receiving Christ’s Atonement.” In Tracing Ancient Threads in the Book of Moses: Inspired Origins, Temple Contexts, and Literary Qualities, Volume 1. Edited by Jeffrey M. Bradshaw, David R. Seely, John W. Welch and Scott Gordon, 1–50. Orem, UT; Springville, UT; Redding, CA; Tooele, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, Book of Mormon Central, FAIR, and Eborn Books, 2021.
Petersen, Mark E. “Adam, the Archangel.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1980.
Matthews, Robert J. “Adam-ondi-Ahman.” Brigham Young University Studies 13, no. 1 (1972): 27.
Berrett, LaMar C. “Adam-ondi-Ahman.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism, ed. Daniel H. Ludlow. 1:19–20 New York: Macmillan, 1992.
Gentry, Leland H. “Adam-ondi-Ahman: A Brief Historical Survey.” Brigham Young University Studies 13, no. 4 (1973): 553.
Bailey, Arthur A. “Adam: LDS Sources.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism, ed. Daniel H. Ludlow. 1:15–17 New York: Macmillan, 1992.
Stone, Michael E. Adam’s Contract with Satan: The Legend of the Cheirograph of Adam. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2002.
Dahl, Larry E. “Adam’s Role from the Fall to the End—and Beyond.” In The Man Adam, ed. Joseph Fielding McConkie and Robert L. Millet, 113–29. Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1990.
Smith, Joseph Fielding. “Adam’s Role in Bringing Us Mortality.” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1967.
Richards, James. “Adam’s Song.” BYU Studies 38, no. 3 (1999): 62.
Duncan, Dean. “Adaptation, Enactment, and Ingmar Bergman’s Magic Flute.” BYU Studies 43, no. 3 (2004): 229.
Nelson, Russell M. “Addiction or Freedom.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1988.
Hoskisson, Paul Y. “Additional Janus Parallels in the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 47 (2021): 81-90.

Abstract: A little more than 40 years ago, Cyrus Gordon discovered and described for the first time an ancient literary technique which he had found in the Hebrew Bible, and he gave it a name — a Janus parallel. That is why no one, more than 40 years ago, could have faked a Hebrew Janus parallel in an English translation of an ancient document. But, as I reasoned, if Janus parallels were a Hebrew literary device at the time Lehi left Jerusalem (for an analog see chiasmus), then such parallels probably can be found in the Book of Mormon. In this article I describe the technical methodology for discovering Janus parallels in an English translation, and I provide two new examples.


Horne, Dennis B. “Additional Witnesses of the Coming Forth and Content of the Book of Mormon.” The Interpreter Foundation website. April 20, 2016.
Benson, Ezra Taft. “Address to Departing Missionaries.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 6. 1859, 261–266.

Remarks by Elder Ezra T. Benson, Delivered at a Special Conference held in the Tabernacle, Great Salt Lake City, August 28, 1852. Reported By: G. D. Watt.

Kopischke, Erich W. “Addressing Mental Health.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 2021.

Allow me to share several observations I made as our family has passed through trials.

Anderson, Rick. “Addressing Prickly Issues.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 23 (2017): 253-261.

Review of A Reason for Faith: Navigating LDS Doctrine & Church History, ed. Laura Harris Hales. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book; Provo, UT: BYU Religious Studies Center, 2016. 264 pp. $24.99.

Abstract: This collection of essays conveniently assembles faithful and rigorous treatments of difficult questions related to LDS history and doctrine. While two or three of the essays are sufficiently flawed to give cause for concern and while some of its arguments have been expressed differently in earlier publications, overall this book can be confidently recommended to interested and doctrinally mature Latter-day Saints.

Butler, John M. “Addressing Questions Surrounding the Book of Mormon and DNA Research.” The FARMS Review 18, no. 1 (2006): Article 7.

Butler discusses the premises of the DNA argument between supporters and critics of the Book of Mormon.

Kimball, Heber C. “Adherence to ‘Mormonism’—Perpetual Emigration Fund.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 7. 1860, 39–41.

An Address by President Heber C. Kimball, Delivered at the General Conference, in the Tabernacle, Great Salt Lake City, October 6, 1854. Reported By: Unknown.

Cook, Quentin L. “Adjustments to Strengthen Youth.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 2019.

More young men and young women will rise to the challenge and stay on the covenant path because of this laser-like focus on our youth.

Tanner, N. Eldon. “The Administration of the Church.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1979.
Richards, George F. “Admonition.” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1945.
Grant, Heber J. “Admonition and Blessing.” Delivered at the Friday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1944.
Lee, Harold B. “Admonitions for the Priesthood of God.” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1972.
Smoot, Stephen O. “Admonitions from General Conference to Defend the Church.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 1, 2013.
Kimball, Heber C. “Advancement in Gospel Principles—Order, Unity, and Authority of the Priesthood, Etc.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 6. 1859, 122–129.

A Discourse by President Heber C. Kimball, Delivered in the Tabernacle, Great Salt Lake City, December 13, 1857. Reported By: G. D. Watt.

Young, Brigham. “Advancement in Knowledge, &c.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 8. 1861, 32–34.

Remarks by President Brigham Young, made in the Tabernacle, Great Salt Lake City, April 5, 1860. Reported By: G. D. Watt.

Naisbitt, Henry W. “The Advancement of God’s People Under the Influences of the Gospel, Etc.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 22. 1882, 74–82.

Discourse by Elder Henry W. Naisbitt, delivered in the Assembly Hall Salt Lake City, Sunday Afternoon, Feb. 20, 1881. Reported By: John Irvine.

Kimball, Heber C. “Advancement of the Saints—Unity of the Temporal and Spiritual Interests of the People—Faith and Works Inseparably Connected, Etc.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 10. 1865, 233–238.

Discourse by President Heber C. Kimball, delivered in Provo City, June 27, 1863. Reported By: J. V. Long.

Pratt, Orson. “The Advantages of the Latter-Day Saints, Compared With the Disadvantages Under Which Noah Labored, Etc.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 3. 1856, 299–307.

A Discourse by Elder Orson Pratt, Delivered in the Bowery, Great Salt Lake City, April 6, 1856. Reported By: G. D. Watt.

Young, Brigham. “Advantages of Trials and Experience—Reformation of Conduct, Etc.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 5. 1858, 293–296.

Remarks by President Brigham Young, Delivered at the Bowery, Great Salt Lake City, Tuesday Morning, October 6, 1857. Reported By: G. D. Watt, J. V. Long.

Hicks, Michael. “Advent.” BYU Studies 34, no. 1 (1994): 42.
LDS Perspectives [pseud. of Laura Harris Hales]. “Adventures in Religious Education with Casey Paul Griffeths.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 16, 2017.
Bennett, Richard E. “Adventures of a Church Historian.” BYU Studies 38, no. 2 (1999): 203.
Wells, Robert E. “Adventures of the Spirit.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1985.
Eyring, Henry B. “Adversity.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2009.

I bear you my testimony that God the Father lives. He set a course for each of us that can polish and perfect us to be with Him.

Peterson, H. Burke. “Adversity and Prayer.” Delivered at the Friday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1973.
Poelman, Ronald E. “Adversity and the Divine Purpose of Mortality.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1989.
Ashton, Marvin J. “Adversity and You.” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1980.
Cowan, Richard O. “Advice from a Prophet: Take Time Out.” Brigham Young University Studies 16, no. 3 (1976): 415.
Peck, Steven L. “Advice on Correct Astronomy.” BYU Studies 35, no. 1 (1995): 40.
Young, Brigham. “Advice to California Emigrants—The Principles of the Gospel, Etc.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 10. 1865, 229–232.

Remarks by President Brigham Young, made on the Public Square, Great Salt Lake City, July 8, 1863. Reported By: G. D. Watt.

Richards, Franklin D. “Advice to Immigrants.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 1. 1854, 316–322.

An Address by Elder Franklin D. Richards, Delivered at the General Conference, Great Salt Lake City, October 6, 1853. Reported By: G. D. Watt.

Young, Brigham. “Advice to Lawyers—Royal Polygamy in Europe—Polygamy Revealed From Heaven.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 11. 1867, 257–263.

Remarks by President Brigham Young, in the Bowery, G.S.L. City, August 12, 1866. Reported By: G. D. Watt.

Lyman, Amasa M. “Advice to Missionaries—Preaching the Gospel—Gathering the Poor, Etc.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 10. 1865, 178–187.

Discourse by Elder Amasa M. Lyman, delivered in the Tabernacle, Great Salt Lake City, April 7, 1863. Reported By: J. V. Long.

Young, Levi Edgar. “Advice to Teachers.” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1959.
Benson, Ezra Taft. “Advice to Youth.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1959.
Peterson, Daniel C. “Advocacy and Inquiry in the Writing of Latter-day Saint History.” BYU Studies 31, no. 2 (1991): 139.
Hyde, Orson. “Affairs in Sanpete County—‘One-man Power’—Unity Required Among the People.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 16. 1874, 228–236.

Discourse by President Orson Hyde, delivered in the New Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Sunday Morning, October 5, 1873. Reported By: David W. Evans.

Welch, Rosalynde Frandsen. “Affinities and Infinities: Joseph Smith and John Milton.” BYU Studies Quarterly 54, no. 3 (2015): 19.
Zivic, Claudio D. “After All We Can Do.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 2007.

We, as members of the Church of Jesus Christ, have chosen not to be ordinary men and women.

Nielson, Marilyn Nelson. “After Eden.” BYU Studies 41, no. 2 (2002): 40.
Brown, Hugh B. “After High School, What?” Delivered at the Priesthood Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1968.
Komatsu, Adney Y. “‘After Much Tribulation Come the Blessings’” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1979.
Munger, MaryJan G. “After Sorrow.” BYU Studies 46, no. 3 (2007): 94.
Clark, Gina. “After the Fall.” BYU Studies 38, no. 4 (1999): 26.
Alvarado, Jorge M. “After the Trial of Our Faith.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 2019.

As we follow God’s voice and His covenant path, He will strengthen us in our trials.

Callis, Charles A. “After the War.” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1944.
Shannon, Avram R. “After Whose Order?: Kingship and Priesthood in the Book of Mormon.” BYU Studies Quarterly 60, no. 4 (2021): 75.
Livingston, Scott. “Aftergrove.” BYU Studies 49, no. 4 (2010): 155.
Addams, R. Jean. “Aftermath of the Martyrdom: The Aspirants to the Mantle of Joseph Smith and the Leadership of Brigham Young in the Months Following the Martyrdom.” “A Life Lived in Crescendo” Firesides. The Interpreter Foundation YouTube channel. November 28, 2021.

Feelings of foreboding were experienced by some members of the Quorum of the Twelve while serving missions in the northeastern states on June 27, 1844, the day the Prophet Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were assassinated. Their promptings led them to return to Nauvoo in haste. We will discuss Sidney Rigdon’s efforts to assume guardianship of the Church in August 1844 and Brigham Young’s resounding response. Then, we will explore the various claims and results of efforts by several aspirants to claim the mantle of the deceased Prophet Joseph. Next, we will examine the solidifying influence of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, led by their president Brigham Young. Finally, I will recount the resulting exodus of the majority of the Saints from western Illinois to Iowa in early 1846. Young continued to deal with the “scattering” of certain individuals and their adherents for several more years and was required to provide the counsel and direction to those apostles that were assigned to facilitate the trek westward from Kanesville in the years that followed.

Peterson, Daniel C. “Afterword.” FARMS Review of Books 11, no. 2 (1999): Article 9.

In response to the articles in this issue, Peterson notes that Latter-day Saints do not extend themselves to expose and attack other faiths. He further discusses, among other things, an open canon and continuing revelation, salvation as outlined in the scriptures, the ordinances of the gospel, revelation following the incarnation and resurrection of Christ, the biblical canon, inerrancy, biblical texts, the Book of Abraham, and the nature of God.

Hill, Marvin S. “Afterword 30:4.” BYU Studies 30, no. 4 (1990): 117.
Pratt, John P. “Afterwords 23:2.” Brigham Young University Studies 23, no. 2 (1983): 143.
Newell, Linda King. “Afterwords 25:2.” Brigham Young University Studies 25, no. 2 (1985): 96.
Thomas, Darwin L. “Afterwords 26:2.” Brigham Young University Studies 26, no. 2 (1986): 99.
Poll, Richard D. “Afterwords 27:2.” BYU Studies 27, no. 2 (1987): 136.
Alexander, Thomas G. “Afterwords 29:4.” BYU Studies 29, no. 4 (1989): 143.
Partridge, Dixie L. “Again, October.” BYU Studies 40, no. 3 (2001): 173.
Gillum, Gary P. “Against the Grain: Christianity and Democracy, War and Peace.” BYU Studies 48, no. 3 (2009): 169.
Clark, J. Reuben, Jr. “Against the Time of Need.” Delivered at the Tuesday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1948.
Howland, Melissa. “Against the Wall: Johann Huber and the First Mormons in Austria.” BYU Studies Quarterly 56, no. 3 (2017): 202.
Lythgoe, Dennis L. “Age Hasn't Slowed Sharp Wit, Mind.” Deseret News, 31 January 2003.
Taylor, John H. “The Age in Which We Live—The Position the Latter-Day Saints Occupy—The Progress They Have Made Through the Medium of the Gospel—The Hatred Manifested Against the Saints of God—Cain—Sufferings of Former-Day Saints—Sufferings of the Latter-Day Saints—The Attacks of Religious Fanatics and Political Demagogues—The Mormons Are not Scared—Duties of the Latter-Day Saints—The Consequences of Allowing Our Children to Be Educated By Our Enemies—The Work of Our Enemies—Their Aims—Freedom Extended to All Sects in Utah—What the Mormons Claim—Their Belief in Plural Marriage—Institutions Introduced By Christian Civilizers—No Yielding of the Principles God Has Revealed—Conclusion.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 24. 1884, 347–356.

Discourse by President John Taylor, delivered in Kaysville, Davis County, Sunday, December 9, 1883. Reported By: John Irvine.

Jackson, Kent P. “An Age of Contrasts: From Adam to Abraham.” Ensign 26, no. 2, February 1986, 28–30.
Nibley, Hugh W. “An Age of Discovery.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1985.

It is very important for Latter-day Saints to keep pace, more or Less, with the fast-moving developments in the fields of Bible and related studies. By failing to do this we run the risk of laboring to accommodate our religion to scientific and scholarly teachings that have long since been superceded, altered, or completely discarded.

Smith, Joseph Fielding. “An Age of Visitation and Revelation—Revelation the Law of Government—The Nature of Death—Jesus Our Forerunner and Exemplar—The Three Witnesses—Personal Knowledge Above All—Ordinances for the Dead.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 19. 1878, 258–265.

Funeral Services Preached by Elder Joseph F. Smith, Over the Remains of Emma, Daughter of Elder Daniel H. and Emmeline Wells, on Thursday Morning, April 11, 1878. Reported By: Geo. F. Gibbs.

Harris, John S. “The Age of Wonders.” BYU Studies 30, no. 4 (1990): 58.
Cannon, Elaine A. “Agency and Accountability.” Delivered at the General Women’s Meeting of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1983.
Brown, Victor L., Jr. “Agency and Accountability.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1985.
Robbins, Lynn G. “Agency and Anger.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1998.

A cunning part of [Satan’s] strategy is to dissociate anger from agency, making us believe that we are victims of an emotion that we cannot control.

Packer, Boyd K. “Agency and Control.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1983.
Hanks, Marion D. “Agency and Love.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1983.
Schilaty, Ben. “Agency and Same-Sex Attraction.” BYU Studies Quarterly 58, no. 2 (2019): 81.
Vandenberg, John H. “The Agency of Man.” Delivered at the Friday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1973.
Wells, Daniel H. “Agency of Man to Practice Good or Evil Principles.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 9. 1862, 259–262.

Remarks by President Daniel H. Wells, made in the Tabernacle, Great Salt Lake City, March 6, 1862. Reported By: J. V. Long.

Hales, Robert D. “Agency: Essential to the Plan of Life.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 2010.

Whenever we choose to come unto Christ, take His name upon us, and follow His servants, we progress along the path to eternal life.

Larsen, Sharon G. “Agency—A Blessing and a Burden.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1999.

Agency is the power to think, choose, and act for ourselves. It comes with endless opportunities, accompanied by responsibility and consequences.

Jackson, Kent P., and Charles Swift. “The Ages of the Patriarchs in the Joseph Smith Translation.” In A Witness for the Restoration: Essays in Honor of Robert J. Matthews, edited by Kent P. Jackson and Andrew C. Skinner, 1–11. Provo, UT: BYU Religious Studies Center, 2007.
Buell, Thea Jo. “Aguas Vivas.” BYU Studies Quarterly 60, no. 1 (2021): 197.
Hauglid, Brian M. “Al-Ghazali, a Muslim Seeker of Truth.” BYU Studies 40, no. 4 (2001): 89.
Nelson, Fred W. “Alan C. Miner. Step by Step through the Book of Mormon: The Story in Scriptures--A Geographical, Cultural, and Historical System of Understanding and Step by Step through the Book of Mormon: A Cultural Commentary, Part 1--Through the Wilderness to the Promised Land.” FARMS Review of Books 9, no. 1 (1997): Article 7.

Review of Step by Step through the Book of Mormon: The Story in Scriptures? A Geographical, Cultural, and Historical System of Understanding (1996), and Step by Step through the Book of Mormon: A Cultural Commentary, Part 1?Through the Wilderness to the Promised Land (1996), by Alan C. Miner

McKinlay, Daniel B. “Alan Goff, ‘A Hermeneutic of Sacred Texts: Historicism, Revisionism, Positivism, and the Bible and the Book of Mormon?’” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): Article 12.

Review of “A Hemeneutic of Sacred Texts: Historicism, Revisionism, Postitiveism, and the Bible and Book of Mormon” (1989), by Alan Goff.

Walker, Jim. “Alberta Wheat Pool.” Brigham Young University Studies 26, no. 1 (1986): 122.
Palmer, Alison. “Alexander Campbell and Joseph Smith: Nineteenth-Century Restorationists.” BYU Studies Quarterly 58, no. 3 (2019): 192.
Nibley, Hugh W. “Alexander the Great.” Nibley, Hugh and Michael D. Rhodes.

One Eternal Round is the culmination of Hugh Nibley’s thought on the book of Abraham and represents over fifteen years of research and writing. The volume includes penetrating insights into Egyptian pharaohs and medieval Jewish and Islamic traditions about Abraham; Greek, Egyptian, and Mesopotamian myths; the Aztec calendar stone; Hopi Indian ceremonies; and early Jewish and Christian apocrypha, as well as the relationship of myth, ritual, and history.

Peek, Cecilia M. “Alexander the Great Comes to Jerusalem: The Jewish Response to Hellenism.” BYU Studies 36, no. 3 (1996): 99.
Maynard, Gregory. “Alexander William Doniphan: Man of Justice.” Brigham Young University Studies 13, no. 4 (1973): 462.
Meyer, Casualene. “Alexandria Bay, bibliophile.” BYU Studies 34, no. 1 (1994): 28.
Moss, Kendall. “Alhamdulilah: The Apparent Accidental Establishment of the Church in Guinea.” BYU Studies 45, no. 4 (2006): 19.
Howe, Susan Elizabeth. “Aliens.” BYU Studies Quarterly 54, no. 3 (2015): 180.
Harris, John S. “Alkali.” Brigham Young University Studies 24, no. 3 (1984): 337.
Perego, Ugo A. “All Abraham’s Children: A Genetic Perspective.” Paper presented at the 2016 Science & Mormonism Symposium: Body, Brain, Mind & Spirit. March 12, 2016.
Jacobson, Cardell K. “All Abraham’s Children: Changing Mormon Conceptions of Race and Lineage.” BYU Studies 45, no. 2 (2006): 163.
Hilton, John L., and Ken Jenkins. “All Book of Mormon References by Author and Literary Form: A Full Listing of Book of Mormon References by Author and Literary Form.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1983.
Peterson, Daniel C. “‘All Can Partake, Freely’” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 42 (2021): vii-xiv.

Abstract: The Interpreter Foundation welcomes faithful ideas, insights, and manuscripts from people of all backgrounds. In this brief essay, I share some that were recently shared with me regarding Lehi’s vision of the tree of life, as recorded in 1 Nephi 8. Among other things, Lehi seems to have been shown that the divine offer of salvation extends far beyond a small elite. As Peter exclaims in the King James rendering of Acts 10:34, “God is no respecter of persons.” Other translations render the same words as saying that he doesn’t “play favorites” or “show partiality.” The passage in James 1:5 with which the Restoration commenced clearly announces that, if they will simply ask, God “giveth to all men liberally.”.

Interpreter Foundation. “All D&C Lessons Scripture Roundtables Available.” The Interpreter Foundation website. January 12, 2017.
Christiansen, ElRay L. “All Good Cometh of God.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1957.
Kimball, Richard I. “All Hail to Christmas: Mormon Pioneer Holiday Celebrations.” BYU Studies 40, no. 3 (2001): 6.
Taylor, John H. “All Intelligence Comes From God—Life and Immortality Brought to Light Through the Gospel—Gathering—Temple Building—The Elders Messengers of Salvation to the Nations.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 20. 1880, 219–229.

Discourse by President John Taylor, delivered at the 17th Ward Meetinghouse, on Sunday Afternoon, December 15, 1878. Reported By: Geo. F. Gibbs.

Dahl, Paul E. “‘All Is Well . . .’: The Story of ‘the Hymn That Went around the World’” Brigham Young University Studies 21, no. 4 (1981): 515.
Smith, Eldred G. “All May Share in Adam’s Blessing.” Delivered at the Tuesday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1971.
Oaks, Dallin H. “All Men Everywhere.” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2006.

Again and again the Book of Mormon teaches that the gospel of Jesus Christ is universal in its promise and effect.

Pratt, Orson. “All Men to Be Judged Out of the Books—Adam the Ancient of Days—In the Days of Enoch the Righteous Gathered Together From the Ends of the Earth to One Place—The Great Prophet Joseph Smith Raised Up By God to Reveal Hidden Mysteries.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 17. 1875, 181–188.

Discourse by Elder Orson Pratt, delivered at the Adjourned Semi-Annual Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, in the New Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Sunday Morning, October 11, 1874. Reported By: David W. Evans.

Hedges, Andrew H. “All My Endeavors to Preserve Them: Protecting the Plates in Palmyra, 22 September-December 1827.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1992).

After Joseph Smith received the gold plates from the angel Moroni, he had to take great measures to protect them from people who wanted to steal them for their monetary value. Although Joseph did not leave much documentation of such experiences, the people who were closely associated with him at the time did. Using what records still exist, Hedges pieces together some of the stories of Joseph’s challenges in obtaining and protecting the gold plates.

Hyde, Orson. “All Nationalities Merged in the Kingdom of God—The Unity and Happiness of the Saints.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 10. 1865, 112–113.

Remarks by Elder Orson Hyde, made at the Bowery, Great Salt Lake City, October 7, 1862. Reported By: J. V. Long.

Pratt, Orson. “All Nations Believe in a Future State of Existence—All Inherit the Curse in the Death of the Body—The Zion of Enoch Taken to the Bosom of God—Celestial, Terrestrial and Telestial Spheres—Baptism in Water Essential to Salvation—Divine Authority—Eternal Marriage Ordained of God.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 17. 1875, 145–154.

Discourse by Elder Orson Pratt, delivered in the Old Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Sunday Afternoon, July 19, 1874. Reported By: David W. Evans.

Gong, Gerrit W. “All Nations, Kindreds, and Tongues.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 2020.
Gillum, Gary P. “All Scripture Index to Hugh Nibley's Works.” FARMS Preliminary Report.

A full list of scripture references used in works written by Hugh Nibley.

Taylor, John H. “All Temporal Concerns Need the Attention of the Saints—We Should Prepare for the Evils Coming Upon the Earth—Cooperation and the United Order—Functions of the Two Priesthoods—Home Manufactures.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 21. 1881, 29–38.

Discourse by President John Taylor, delivered at the Semi-Annual Conference, Held in the Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, April 9, 1879. Reported By: Geo. F. Gibbs.

Hafen, Bruce C. “All That Was Promised: The St. George Temple and the Unfolding of the Restoration.” BYU Studies Quarterly 54, no. 3 (2015): 193.
Nibley, Hugh W. “All the Court’s a Stage: Facsimile 3, a Royal Mumming.” In Abraham in Egypt, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 14, 2nd ed. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 2000.

The Book of Abraham, one of the canonized works of Latter-day Saint scripture brought forth by the Prophet Joseph Smith, has been attacked by critics since its publication in 1842. In Abraham in Egypt, LDS scholar Hugh Nibley draws on his erudition in ancient languages, literature, and history to defend the book on historical and doctrinal grounds. Nibley examines the Book of Abraham’s striking connections with ancient texts and Egyptian religion and culture. He discusses the book’s many nonbiblical themes that are found in apocryphal literature not known or available in Smith’s day. In opening up many other lines of inquiry, Nibley lays an essential foundation for further research on the biblical patriarch Abraham. This enlarged, second edition of Nibley’s classic 1981 work of the same title updates the endnotes, includes many illustrations, and adds several chapters taken from a series of articles in the Improvement Era entitled “A Look at the Pearl of Great Price,” which Nibley wrote between 1968 and 1970.

Fletcher-Louis, Crispin H. T. All the Glory of Adam: Liturgical Anthropology in the Dead Sea Scrolls. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill, 2002.
Esplin, Ronald K. “‘All the Measures of Joseph’ – Keys and Continuity in the Succession of 1844.” “A Life Lived in Crescendo” Firesides. The Interpreter Foundation YouTube channel. October 31, 2021.

Joseph Smith well understood that Nauvoo provided his final opportunity to finish the foundation of the Restoration and complete the mission he had been given. He also knew that his time would be short for “according to his prayers God had appointed him elsewhere”— and others would finish the work he had begun.

It is not surprising then, in retrospect, that he wasted no time once a majority of the Twelve had returned to Nauvoo from Britain, now proven as a successful administrative and leadership quorum, to put them in the harness in new ways. Unwilling to wait until October conference, Joseph called a “special conference” in August 1841, the month following their return, to announce to the saints that the Quorum of the Twelve apostles would have enlarged responsibilities, overseeing with the First Presidency the entire church, rather than being restricted to carrying the gospel abroad, outside the stakes, as before. “Business of the Church given to the 12,” noted Willard Richard in his diary about this event that portended important future developments. From that point forward, Young and his fellow apostles were involved in all aspects of church governance and development. They were at Joseph’s side both publicly and in private, from the first temple-related ordinances in May 1842 through administration of additional ordinances and organization of the Council of Fifty in 1844.

This presentation offers an overview of how these new assignments, responsibilities and opportunities prepared Brigham Young and the Quorum of the Twelve to “carry the burden in the heat of the day,” even in Joseph’s absence. It will show that Joseph saw to them receiving “every key and every power that he ever held himself before God,“ preparing them and fully empowering them to, as they proclaimed, “carry out all the measures of Joseph”—to complete on the foundation he laid the edifice he had envisioned and begun.

Roundy, Bruce A., and Robert J. Norman. “‘All Things Denote There is a God’: Seeing Christ in the Creation.” Religious Educator 6, no. 2 (2005): 51–62.

The Lord told Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery, “Look unto me in every thought” (D&C 6:36). In the ordinance of the sacrament we covenant each week to “always remember him,” that we “may always have his Spirit” to be with us (D&C 20:77). The Book of Mormon testifies that “all things denote there is a God; yea, even the earth, and all thing that are upon the face of it” (Alma 30:44). Thus, God has given all things as a type or representation of Christ to help us remember Him (see 2 Nephi 11:4; Helaman 8:24). The key to understanding the things of God is to see Christ in them, including His creations.

Taylor, John H. “All Things Governed By Law—All Intelligence and Blessings Have Emanated From God—Man’s Free Agency Should Not Be Interfered With—The Opponents of the Kingdom of God Should Not Be Allowed to Teach Our Children—Necessity of All Being Subject to Legitimate Authority.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 20. 1880, 129–137.

Discourse by President John Taylor, delivered at Bountiful, Davis County, on Sunday Afternoon, December 1, 1878. Reported By: Geo. F. Gibbs.

Beecher, Maureen Ursenbach. “‘All Things Move in Order in the City’: The Nauvoo Diary of Zina Diantha Huntington Jacobs.” Brigham Young University Studies 19, no. 3 (1979): 285.
Tanner, Susan W. “All Things Shall Work Together for Your Good.” Delivered at the General Young Women Meeting of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2004.

As we search, pray, and believe, we will recognize miracles in our lives and become miracle workers in the lives of others.

Howe, Susan Elizabeth. “All Things Sing Praise.” BYU Studies Quarterly 60, no. 1 (2021): 128.
Dant, Doris R. “All Things Testify of Him: Inspirational Paintings by Latter-day Saint Artists.” BYU Studies 38, no. 1 (1999): 221.
Martino, James B. “All Things Work Together for Good.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2010.

We may never know in this life why we face what we do, but we can feel confident that we can grow from the experience.

Menlove, Coleen K. “All Thy Children Shall Be Taught.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2005.

Children need to know that having faith in the Savior and following Him will help them receive peace in this troubled world.

Hickman, Trenton L. “All Tucked In.” BYU Studies 36, no. 1 (1996): 200.
Swift, Hales. “All We Can/Could Do Is Repentance (Alma 24).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 29, 2020.
Lamb, John D. “All Ye Need to Know.” BYU Studies Quarterly 53, no. 3 (2014): 146.
Ricks, Shirley S. “Allan K. Burgess and Max H. Molgard, Fun for Family Night: Book of Mormon Edition.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3 (1991): Article 5.

Review of Fun for Family Night: Book of Mormon Edition (1990), by Allan K. Burgess and Max H. Molgard.

Snow, Edward. “Allan K. Burgess, Living the Book of Mormon: A Guide to Understanding and Applying Its Principles in Today's World.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 4 (1992): Article 41.

Review of Living the Book of Mormon: A Guide to Understanding and Applying Its Principles in Today's World (1991), by Allen K. Burgess.

Livingstone, Amy L. “Allan K. Burgess. Timely Truths from the Book of Mormon.” FARMS Review of Books 9, no. 1 (1997): Article 4.

Review of Timely Truths from the Book of Mormon (1995), by Allan K. Burgess

Malzl, Philipp B. “An Allegory of Eden: Marc Chagall’s Magic Flute Poster.” BYU Studies 43, no. 3 (2004): 218.
Swift, Hales. “An Allegory of the Olive Tree Potpourri – Some Notes on Jacob 5.” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 26, 2020.
Honey, David B. “The Allegory of the Olive Tree: The Olive, the Bible, and Jacob 5.” BYU Studies 35, no. 1 (1995): 238.
Jensen, De Lamar. “Allied Strategy in World War II: The Churchill Era, 1942–1943.” Brigham Young University Studies 5, no. 1 (1962): 49.
Swift, Hales. “Alma 36: Christ as Turning Point.” The Interpreter Foundation website. July 20, 2020.
Swift, Hales. “Alma 44: Just and Unjust War, Simile Curses, and Repentance.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 11, 2020.
Swift, Hales. “Alma 55:4-9: Nephite and Lamanite Differences More about Sound than Look.” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 11, 2020.
Reid L. Neilson. “Alma O. Taylor’s Fact-Finding Mission to China.” BYU Studies 40, no. 1 (2001): 176.
Thomas, M. Catherine. “Alma the Younger (Parts 1 & 2).” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1996. Transcript of a lecture given at the FARMS Book of Mormon Lecture Series.

Catherine Thomas places Alma and his teachings within the context of the premortal existence to show his concern for the plan of redemption. She notes that some spirits were notably more responsive in their faith than others and that Israel was there organized. Alma’s discourses are set against his dramatic conversion, from a condition of abject wickedness to that of a highly motivated saint. His transformation serves as a model of encouragement for the lost soul seeking a higher state.

Keywords: Book of Mormon, Teachings
Bowen, Matthew L. “Alma — Young Man, Hidden Prophet.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 19 (2016): 343-353.

Abstract: The biographical introduction of Alma the Elder into the Book of Mormon narrative (Mosiah 17:2) also introduces the name Alma into the text for the first time, this in close juxtaposition with a description of Alma as a “young man.” The best explanation for the name Alma is that it derives from the Semitic term ǵlm (Hebrew ʿelem), “young man,” “youth,” “lad.” This suggests the strong probability of an intentional wordplay on the name Alma in the Book of Mormon’s underlying text: Alma became “[God’s] young man” or “servant.” Additional lexical connections between Mosiah 17:2 and Mosiah 14:1 (quoting Isaiah 53:1) suggest that Abinadi identified Alma as the one “to whom” or “upon whom” (ʿal-mî) the Lord was “reveal[ing]” his arm as Abinadi’s prophetic successor. Alma began his prophetic succession when he “believed” Abinadi’s report and pled with King Noah for Abinadi’s life. Forced to flee, Alma began his prophetic ministry “hidden” and “concealed” while writing the words of Abinadi and teaching them “privately.” The narrative’s dramatic emphasis on this aspect of Alma’s life suggests an additional thread of wordplay that exploits the homonymy between Alma and the Hebrew root *ʿlm, forms of which mean “to hide,” “conceal,” “be hidden,” “be concealed.” The richness of the wordplay and allusion revolving around Alma’s name in Mosiah 17–18 accentuates his importance as a prophetic figure and founder of the later Nephite church. Moreover, it suggests that Alma’s name was appropriate given the details of his life and that he lived up to the positive connotations latent in his name.

Whittaker, David J. “Almanacs in the New England Heritage of Mormonism.” BYU Studies 29, no. 4 (1989): 89.
Conkling, J. Christopher. “Alma’s Enemies: The Case of the Lamanites, Amlicites, and Mysterious Amalekites.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 14 no. 1 (2005).

In Alma 21 a new group of troublemakers is introduced—the Amalekites—without explanation or introduction. This article offers arguments that this is the same group called Amlicites elsewhere and that the confusion is caused by Oliver Cowdery’s inconsistency in spelling. If this theory is accurate, then Alma structured his narrative record more tightly and carefully than previously realized. The concept also challenges the simplicity of the good Nephite/bad Lamanite rubric so often used to describe the players in the book of Mormon.

Goff, Alan. “Alma’s Prophetic Commissioning Type Scene.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 51 (2022): 115-164.

Abstract: The story often referred to as Alma’s conversion narrative is too often interpreted as a simplistic plagiarism of Paul’s conversion-to-Christianity story in the book of Acts. Both the New and Old Testaments appropriate an ancient narrative genre called the prophetic commissioning story. Paul’s and Alma’s commissioning narratives hearken back to this literary genre, and to refer to either as pilfered is to misunderstand not just these individual narratives but the larger approach Hebraic writers used in composing biblical and Book of Mormon narrative. To the modern mind the similarity in stories triggers explanations involving plagiarism and theft from earlier stories and denies the historicity of the narratives; ancient writers — especially of Hebraic narrative — had a quite different view of such concerns. To deny the historical nature of the stories because they appeal to particular narrative conventions is to impose a mistaken modern conceptual framework on the texts involved. A better and more complex grasp of Hebraic narrative is a necessary first step to understanding these two (and many more) Book of Mormon and biblical stories.

The idea of conversion has both a history and a geography.1

Keywords: Alma, Book of Mormon, conversion, prophetic commissioning
Brown, Amanda Colleen. “Alma’s Reality: Reading Alma as Sinful, Repentant, Traumatized, Questioning, and Righteous.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 46 (2021): 249-252.

Review of Kylie Nielson Turley, Alma 1–29: A Brief Theological Introduction (Provo, UT: The Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship, 2020). 162 pages. $9.95 (paperback).

Abstract: Kylie Nielson Turley delves deep into the conversion and ministry of Alma the Younger, reading new life into a well-known narrative. By analyzing Alma’s story with the full weight of his humanity in mind, she breathes emotion into Alma’s conversion and missionary efforts. Her efforts to read Alma without a veneer of superhumanity result in a highly relatable figure who has known wickedness, repentance, loss, depression, and righteousness.

Swift, Hales. “Alma’s Testimony of Christ’s Birth and Mission (Alma 7).” The Interpreter Foundation website. June 1, 2020.
Allred, Philip A. “Alma’s Use of State in the Book of Mormon: Evidence of Multiple Authorship.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 5 no. 1 (1996).

Alma’s distinctive use of the word state in the Book of Mormon is present in his unique concentration of state, his tendency to reword with state, and his treatment of a shared topic involving state.

Blackhurst, Benjamin. “Almost a Psalm, about Inheritance.” BYU Studies Quarterly 55, no. 2 (2016): 154.
Jacobson, Cardell K. “Almost Christian: What the Faith of Our Teenagers Is Telling the American Church.” BYU Studies 50, no. 3 (2011): 174.
Sabin, Steve. “An (Almost) Uncensored Interview with Hugh Nibley.” Student Review, 24 March 1993, 3.

Student Review once managed to interview Hugh Nibley; one of his students performed the interview for us in his office some Saturday. The guy came up with all sorts of questions, and Hugh answered them all. We all listened to the tape several times over; it was cool stuff. We ran it as “An (Almost) Uncensored Interview with Hugh Nibley,” from which my favorite line was a comment he made when asked about the BYU administration (as it existed circa 1994): “Lawyers! Lawyers everywhere! Nothing but lawyers!” Also, he called Supreme Court Justice Scalia “just plain stupid.” (from a comment at TimesandSeasons.org)

Morrell, Jeannette. “Along the Old Utah Highway 91.” Brigham Young University Studies 9, no. 1 (1968): 54.
Larson, Clinton F. “Alpha and Omega at the End.” Brigham Young University Studies 26, no. 3 (1986): 109.
Tuttle, A. Theodore. “Altar, Tent, Well.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1972.
Hicks, Michael. “Altarpiece.” BYU Studies 35, no. 1 (1995): 144.
Cannon, George Q. “Altered Circumstances of Gathered Israel—Allurements of Satan at Work—Selfishness and Avarice Should Be Cast Aside—Devotion to the Work of God—The Order of Enoch the Means of Establishing An Equality in Temporal Things—Heavenly Agencies Cooperating With the Saints.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 16. 1874, 115–121.

Discourse by Elder George Q. Cannon, delivered in the Bowery, Logan City, Sunday Morning, June 29, 1873. Reported By: David W. Evans.

Oaks, Dallin H. “Alternate Voices.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1989.
Palmer, Spencer J. “Alternative Altars: Unconventional and Eastern Spirituality in America.” Brigham Young University Studies 21, no. 2 (1981): 250.
Oaks, Dallin H. “‘Always Have His Spirit’” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1996.
Oaks, Dallin H. “Always Remember Him.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1988.
Gong, Gerrit W. “Always Remember Him.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2016.

I humbly testify and pray that we will always remember Him—in all times, all things, and all places we may be in.

Eyring, Henry B. “‘Always Remember Him’” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1995.
Bednar, David A. “Always Retain a Remission of Your Sins.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2016.

By the sanctifying power of the Holy Ghost as our constant companion, we can always retain a remission of our sins.

Taylor, Brian K. “Am I a Child of God?” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2018.

How can each of us experience the power of understanding our divine identity? It begins by seeking to know God, our Father.

Jackson, Kent P. “Am I a Christian?” FARMS Review of Books 14, no. 1 (2002): Article 10.

Review of “Is Mormonism Christian?” (2002), by Craig L. Blomberg

Hunter, Howard W. “Am I a ‘Living’ Member?” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1987.
Cornish, J. Devn. “Am I Good Enough? Will I Make It?” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 2016.

If you will really try and will not rationalize or rebel—repenting often and pleading for grace—you positively are going to be “good enough.”

Taylor, Henry D. “Am I My Brother’s Keeper?” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1972.
Richards, Franklin D. “The Amazing Growth of the Church.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1961.
Hickman, Martin B. “The Ambassadorial Years: Some Insights.” Brigham Young University Studies 13, no. 3 (1973): 405.
Harris, John B. “The Ambivalants.” Brigham Young University Studies 20, no. 2 (1980): 150.
Nibley, Hugh W. “An Ambivalent Emblem.” 6 pp.

An article about being in the world but not of the world.

Park, Benjamin E. “America 1844: Religious Fervor, Westward Expansion, and the Presidential Election That Transformed the Nation.” BYU Studies Quarterly 56, no. 2 (2017): 153.
Benson, Ezra Taft. “America a Choice Land.” Delivered at the Church of the Air Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1944.
Pratt, Orson. “America a Choice Land—Its Aborigines.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 12. 1869, 338–346.

Discourse by Elder Orson Pratt, delivered in the Old Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Sunday, Dec. 27, 1868. Reported By: David W. Evans.

Petersen, Mark E. “America and God.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1968.
Poll, Richard D. “America and the Rational Road to Peace.” Brigham Young University Studies 3, no. 3 (1961): 3.
Sorenson, John L. “America B.C.: Ancient Settlers in the New World.” Brigham Young University Studies 17, no. 3 (1977): 373.
Monson, Thomas S. “America Needs You.” Delivered at the Church of the Air Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1964.
Petersen, Mark E. “America Testifies of Christ.” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1967.
Benson, Ezra Taft. “America: Land of the Blessed.” Delivered at the Monday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1948.
Browning, Gary L. “American and Russian Perceptions of Freedom and Security.” Brigham Young University Studies 25, no. 1 (1985): 115.
Cooper, Rex. “American Congregations, Volumes 1 and 2.” BYU Studies 35, no. 3 (1995): 173.
Baugh, Alexander L. “American Crucifixion: The Murder of Joseph Smith and the Fate of the Mormon Church.” BYU Studies Quarterly 54, no. 4 (2015): 198.
Sorenson, John L. “The American Discovery of Europe.” BYU Studies 46, no. 3 (2007): 185.
Hilsman, Roger. “American Foreign Policy: Focus on Asia.” Brigham Young University Studies 12, no. 1 (1971): 9.
Kramer, Neal W. “American Gospel: God, the Founding Fathers, and the Making of a Nation.” BYU Studies 46, no. 3 (2007): 157.
Phillips, James W. “American Grace: How Religion Divides and Unites Us.” BYU Studies 50, no. 1 (2011): 159.
Benson, Ezra Taft. “The American Heritage of Freedom—A Plan of God.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1961.
Launius, Roger D. “The American Home Missionary Society Collection and Mormonism.” Brigham Young University Studies 23, no. 2 (1983): 201.
Robertson, John S. “An American Indian Language Family with Middle Eastern Loanwords: Responding to A Recent Critique.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 34 (2020): 1-16.

Abstract: In 2015 Brian Stubbs published a landmark book, demonstrating that Uto-Aztecan, an American Indian language family, contains a vast number of Northwest Semitic and Egyptian loanwords spoken in the first millennium bc. Unlike other similar claims — absurd, eccentric, and without substance — Stubbs’s book is a serious, linguistically based study that deserves serious consideration. In the scholarly world, any claim of Old World influence in the New World languages is met with critical, often hostile skepticism. This essay is written in response to one such criticism.

Welch, John W. “The American Inns of Court: Reclaiming a Noble Profession.” BYU Studies 38, no. 1 (1999): 219.
Mason, Patrick Q. “American Jesus: How the Son of God Became a National Icon.” BYU Studies 44, no. 3 (2005): 184.
Howe, Susan Elizabeth. “The American Political Animal.” BYU Studies Quarterly 61, no. 1 (2022): 212.
Marks, Loren D. “American Religions and the Family: How Faith Traditions Cope with Modernization and Democracy.” BYU Studies 48, no. 1 (2009): 182.
Bushman, Richard Lyman. “American Religions and the Rise of Mormonism.” Brigham Young University Studies 7, no. 2 (1966): 161.
Porter, Blaine R. “American Teen-Agers of the 1960’s—Our Despair or Hope?” Brigham Young University Studies 16, no. 1 (1975): 48.
Petersen, Mark E. “The American Travail.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1967.
Seferovich, Heather M. “American Universities and the Birth of Modern Mormonism, 1867–1940.” BYU Studies Quarterly 56, no. 4 (2017): 179.
Abajian, Kathryn J. “American Women Modernists: The Legacy of Robert Henri, 1910–1945.” BYU Studies 47, no. 1 (2008): 191.
Lyon, T. Edgar. “The ‘Americanization’ of Utah for Statehood.” Brigham Young University Studies 12, no. 1 (1971): 138.
Benson, Ezra Taft. “Americans Are Destroying America.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1968.
Benson, Ezra Taft. “America—A Man and an Event.” Delivered at the Sunday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1965.
Benson, Ezra Taft. “America—What of the Future?” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1952.
Romney, Marion G. “America’s Destiny.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1975.
McMurtry, Benjamin. “The Amlicites and Amalekites: Are They the Same People?” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 25 (2017): 269-281.

Abstract: Royal Skousen’s Book of Mormon Critical Text Project has proposed many hundreds of changes to the text of the Book of Mormon. A subset of these changes does not come from definitive evidence found in the manuscripts or printed editions but are conjectural emendations. In this paper, I examine one of these proposed changes — the merging of two dissenting Nephite groups, the Amlicites and the Amalekites. Carefully examining the timeline and geography of these groups shows logical problems with their being the same people. This paper argues that they are, indeed, separate groups and explores a plausible explanation for the missing origins of the Amalekites.

Yerman, Bruce E. “Ammon and the Mesoamerican Custom of Smiting off Arms.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 1 (1992).

Ammon, a Nephite missionary who chose to serve a Lamanite king as his servant, gained fame by cutting off the arms of the king’s enemies. The practice of smiting off arms of enemies as trophies fits a cultural pattern known among the later Aztecs and Maya in pre-Spanish Mesoamerica.

Boyce, Duane. “The Ammonites Were Not Pacifists.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 20 (2016): 293-313.

Abstract: Although it is common to believe that the Ammonites were pacifists, the report of their story demonstrates that this is a mistake. Appreciating the Ammonites’ non-pacifism helps us think more clearly about them, and it also explains several features of the text. These are textual elements that surprise us if we assume that the Ammonites were pacifists, but that make perfect sense once we understand that they were not. Moreover, in addition to telling us that the Ammonites were not pacifists, the text also gives us the actual reason the Ammonites came to eschew all conflict — and we learn from this why significant prophetic leaders (from King Benjamin to Alma to Mormon) did not reject the sword in the same way. The text also reveals the intellectual flaw in supposing that the Ammonites’ early acts of self-sacrifice set the proper example for all disciples to follow.

Unattributed. “Ammon’s Rehearsal.” BYU Studies 37, no. 1 (1997): 205.
Smart, Lyman. “Among the Mormons.” Brigham Young University Studies 1, no. 1 (1959): 73.
Cowley, Matthew. “Among the Polynesians.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1948.
Interpreter Foundation. “Amy L. Williams on ‘Answering New Atheism and Seeking a Sure Knowledge of God’” The Interpreter Foundation website. November 30, 2014.
Hyde, Orson. “Analogy Betwixt the History of Joseph in Egypt and that of the Latter-Day Saints—Discovery of America By Columbus—Its Effect on the Work of the Last Days—Goodness of God to His People.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 11. 1867, 35–39.

Remarks by Elder Orson Hyde, made in the Tabernacle, Great Salt Lake City, on Sunday, Dec. 18, 1864. Reported By: E. L. Sloan.

Jenkins, Joseph A. “An Analysis from a Teacher's Perspective.” FARMS Review of Books 13, no. 2 (2001): Article 7.

Review of Charting the Book of Mormon (1999), by John W. Welch and J. Gregory Welch

Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part Five: Alma 56 – 3 Nephi 18. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2008.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part Four: Alma 21–55. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2007.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part One: 1 Nephi 1 – 2 Nephi 10. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2004.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

ATV appears in six books and gives a complete analysis of all the important cases of textual variation

(or potential variation) in the history of the Book of Mormon. It starts out with the title page of the Book

of Mormon and the two witness statements, then turns to 1 Nephi and continues through the Book of

Mormon to the end of Moroni.

Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part Six: 3 Nephi 19 – Moroni 10. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2009.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

ATV appears in six books and gives a complete analysis of all the important cases of textual variation

(or potential variation) in the history of the Book of Mormon. It starts out with the title page of the Book

of Mormon and the two witness statements, then turns to 1 Nephi and continues through the Book of

Mormon to the end of Moroni.

Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part Three: Mosiah 17 – Alma 20. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2006.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

ATV appears in six books and gives a complete analysis of all the important cases of textual variation

(or potential variation) in the history of the Book of Mormon. It starts out with the title page of the Book

of Mormon and the two witness statements, then turns to 1 Nephi and continues through the Book of

Mormon to the end of Moroni.

Skousen, Royal. Analysis of Textual Variants of the Book of Mormon Part Two: 2 Nephi 11 – Mosiah 16. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2005.

The version available here online at Interpreter: A Journal of Mormon Scripture is a reproduction of the

printed version of ATV, published in 2004–2009 by the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon

Studies, now a part of the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University.

No textual adjustments to the printed version have been made.

ATV appears in six books and gives a complete analysis of all the important cases of textual variation

(or potential variation) in the history of the Book of Mormon. It starts out with the title page of the Book

of Mormon and the two witness statements, then turns to 1 Nephi and continues through the Book of

Mormon to the end of Moroni.

Matheny, Ray T. “An Analysis of the Padilla Gold Plates.” Brigham Young University Studies 19, no. 1 (1978): 21.
Cutler, John Alba. “Anaranjado.” BYU Studies Quarterly 57, no. 3 (2018): 80.
Howell, Larry L. “Anatomy of Invention.” BYU Studies Quarterly 55, no. 3 (2016): 83.
Parkin, Bonnie D. “An Anchor for Eternity—and Today.” Delivered at the General Young Women Meeting of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1996.
Smith, Joseph Fielding. “An Anchor to Our Souls.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1962.
Wirthlin, Joseph B. “Anchored in Testimony.” Delivered at the Sunday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1975.
Cook, Mary N. “Anchors of Testimony.” Delivered at the General Young Women Meeting of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 2008.

Strengthen your faith by following this pattern of prayer, study, and obedience to the commandments.

Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., and David J. Larsen. “Ancient Affinities within the LDS Book of Enoch Part One.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 4 (2013): 1-27.

Abstract: In this article, we will examine affinities between ancient extracanonical sources and a collection of modern revelations that Joseph Smith termed “extracts from the Prophecy of Enoch.” We build on the work of previous scholars, revisiting their findings with the benefit of subsequent scholarship. Following a perspective on the LDS canon and an introduction to the LDS Enoch revelations, we will focus on relevant passages in pseudepigrapha and LDS scripture within three episodes in the Mormon Enoch narrative: Enoch’s prophetic commission, Enoch’s encounters with the “gibborim,” and the weeping and exaltation of Enoch and his people.

Bradshaw, Jeffrey M., and David J. Larsen. “Ancient Affinities within the LDS Book of Enoch Part Two.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 4 (2013): 29-74.

Abstract: In this article, we will examine affinities between ancient extracanonical sources and a collection of modern revelations that Joseph Smith termed “extracts from the Prophecy of Enoch.” We build on the work of previous scholars, revisiting their findings with the benefit of subsequent scholarship. Following a perspective on the LDS canon and an introduction to the LDS Enoch revelations, we will focus on relevant passages in pseudepigrapha and LDS scripture within three episodes in the Mormon Enoch narrative: Enoch’s prophetic commission, Enoch’s encounters with the “gibborim,” and the weeping and exaltation of Enoch and his people.

Sorenson, John L. “Ancient American Inscriptions: Plow Marks or History?” BYU Studies 33, no. 3 (1993): 639.
Snow, Lorenzo. “Ancient and Modern Israel Compared—God’s Work Progressive—His Overruling Providence.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 23. 1883, 150–155.

Discourse by Apostle Lorenzo Snow, delivered at the General Conference, Friday, A. M., April 7, 1882. Reported By: Geo. F. Gibbs.

Kerr, Todd R. “Ancient Aspects of Nephite Kingship in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 1 no. 1 (1992).

Nephite kings were expected to fulfill the same roles that kings played in other ancient civilizations— commander of the military forces, chief judicial official, and leader of the national religion. A king’s success depended not only on the extent to which he performed each role, but also on the motives behind his service. Selfless rule by Benjamin-type kings commanded the respect and praise of the people, while King Noah’s quest for personal gain roused Old World disdain for the monarch. The Nephite experiment with kingship confirms that between “kings and tyrants there’s this difference known; kings seek their subject’s good; tyrants their own” (Robert Herrick, 1591–1674).

Wright, H. Curtis. “Ancient Burials of Metal Documents in Stone Boxes.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 2. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This paper is an expanded version of a paper presented earlier at the Library History Seminar VI in March 1980.

This paper deals with the persistence of a strange documentary custom of the Mesopotamian kings, which led to numerous burials of metallic documents (often encased in stone boxes or other special containers) and were concealed in the foundations or other inaccessible recesses of temples and palaces.

Nibley, Hugh W. “The Ancient Christian Church.” 160 pp.

This is a manuscript dealing with authority and the councils, possibly related to the 155-page manuscript that became the volume Apostles and Bishops in Early Christianity, which focuses more on the office of Bishop.

Reynolds, Noel B. “The Ancient Doctrine of the Two Ways and the Book of Mormon.” BYU Studies Quarterly 56, no. 3 (2017): 49.
Peterson, Daniel C. “Ancient Documents and Latter-day Saint Scholarship.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, August 3, 1999. This paper was presented at a Brigham Young University devotional on 3 August 1999.

Daniel Peterson discusses recent research that supports a spiritual witness for the Book of Mormon, including the following: Joseph Smith’s lack of schooling, his supposed misnaming of Jesus’ birthplace, the translation process, studies of chiasmus, possible locations for Book of Mormon events, and ancient manuscripts that are consistent with Book of Mormon accounts about document practices and beliefs of past civilizations.

Keywords: Mormon Studies
Currid, John D. Ancient Egypt and the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 1997.
Muhlestein, Kerry. “Ancient Egypt’s Temples, and Parallels by Kerry Muhlestein (Egypt lecture #5).” The Ultimate Egypt – Interpreter Foundation Tour Lecture. The Interpreter Foundation website. September 29, 2021.

Egypt built temples for thousands of years. The largest religious buildings ever built were temples in Egypt, and the largest room in any religious structure is the hypostyle hall in the Karnak Temple. Additionally, no one mastered and used symbolism like the Egyptians. Come explore the purpose of Egyptian temples and see how it can deepen your understanding of religious symbols in modern-day usage as well.

Pratt, Orson. “The Ancient Gospel—Adam’s Transgression, and Man’s Redemption From Its Penalty, &c.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 7. 1860, 251–266.

A Sermon by Elder Orson Pratt, Delivered in the Tabernacle, Great Salt Lake City, September 11, 1859. Reported By: G. D. Watt.

Hardy, Grant R. “Ancient History and Modern Commandments: The Book of Mormon in Comparison with Joseph Smith’s Other Revelations.” In Producing Ancient Scripture: Joseph Smith’s Translation Projects and the Making of Mormon Christianity, edited by Mark Ashurst-McGee, Michael Hubbard MacKay and Brian M. Hauglid, 205–227. Salt Lake City, UT: University of Utah Press, 2020.

Smith, Daniel. “The Ancient Israelite Tabernacle, Its Accoutrements, and the Priestly Vestments.” Paper presented at the 2016 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. November 5, 2016.
Patai, Raphael. “Ancient Jewish Seafaring and River-faring Laws.” In By Study and Also By Faith: Essays in Honor of Hugh W. Nibley on the Occasion of His Eightieth Birthday, 27 March 1990, vol. 1. Edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks. Provo, UT, and Salt Lake City: FARMS and Deseret Book, 1990.

This first of two volumes of essays honoring Hugh Nibley includes scholarly papers based on what the contributors have learned from Dr. Nibley. Nearly every major subject that he has encompassed in his vast learning and scholarly production is represented here by at least one article. Topics include the influence of Nibley, Copts and the Bible, the Seventy in scripture, the great apostasy, the book of Daniel in early Mormon thought, an early Christian initiation ritual, John’s Apocalypse, ancient Jewish seafaring, Native American rites of passage, Sinai as sanctuary and mountain of God, the Qurʾan and creation ex nihilo, and the sacred handclasp and embrace.

This paper presents data, culled primarily from talmudic and midrashic sources, pertaining to the commercial and religious laws that governed Jewish seafaring up to ca. AD 500.

Green, Doyle L., and Jay M. Todd. “The Ancient Land of Egypt.” Green, Doyle L. and Jay M. Todd.

Includes color photographs taken by the author.

Articles introducing Egypt accompanying Nibley’s series “A New Look at the Pearl of Great Price.”

Unattributed. “Ancient Lands: A Photo Essay.” Ensign 10 (Sept. 1980): 32–39.
Nibley, Hugh W. “The Ancient Law of Liberty.” “Time Vindicates the Prophets.” Salt Lake City: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1954. 30 pamphlets, weekly radio addresses from 7 March to 17 October.

Part of a weekly lecture series featured on KSL radio.

A discussion about liberty and ancient beliefs involving such.

Nibley, Hugh W. “The Ancient Law of Liberty.” In The World and the Prophets, The Collected Works of Hugh Nibley 3, edited by John W. Welch, Gary P. Gillum, and Don E. Norton. 3rd ed. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book and FARMS, 1987.

An edited version of a part of a weekly lecture series featured on KSL radio.

A discussion about liberty and ancient beliefs involving such.

Rust, Richard Dilworth. “Ancient Literary Forms in the Book of Mormon.” FARMS Review of Books 14, no. 1 (2002): Article 6.

Review of Finding Biblical Hebrew and Other Ancient Literary Forms in the Book of Mormon (1999), by Hugh W. Pinnock

Welch, John W. “Ancient Near Eastern Law and the Book of Mormon.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1982.
Welch, John W. “Ancient Near Eastern Law and the Book of Mormon.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1984.
Walton, John H. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and the Old Testament: Introducing the Conceptual World of the Hebrew Bible. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2006.
James, Brooke. “The Ancient Order of Things: Essays on the Mormon Temple.” BYU Studies Quarterly 60, no. 4 (2021): 222.
Nibley, Hugh W. “Ancient Ordinances.” Typescript of notes on a talk, n.d.

7 pages.

A talk in which ancient and modern ordinances are compared, and the notes therein.