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A

Abunuwara, Ehab. “Into the Desert: An Arab View of the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 11 no. 1 (2002).

The Book of Mormon culture is found to be strikingly similar to that of the Middle East. An Arab Latter-day Saint tells his experience with the Book of Mormon and how he is able to relate to the stories within its pages because of his cultural origins. Among the congruities discussed are the structure of the family, the concept of taking oaths, the behavior of women, and the danger of the desert. Together, these points demonstrate the worth of the Book of Mormon and show how each reader is able to draw from his or her own cultural background in order to infer different messages.

Adams, William J. “Lehi’s Jerusalem and Writing on Metal Plates.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 3 no. 1 (1994).

The discovery in Jerusalem of two inscribed silver strips, dating from the seventh century BC, support the Book of Mormon claim of writing on metal plates.

Adams, William J. Jr. “More on the Silver Plates from Lehi’s Jerusalem.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 4 no. 2 (1995).

Michael D. Coogan identifies the silver plates found in a Jerusalem burial site as one of the ten most significant finds for biblical archaeology because “they are our earliest witness to the text of the Bible.”

Adams, William J. Jr. “Nephi’s Jerusalem and Laban’s Sword.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2 no. 2 (1993).

A three-foot sword excavated at Vered Jericho, likely dating to 620 BC, lends credence to the description of the sword of Laban in the Book of Mormon.

Adams, William J. Jr. “Synagogues in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 9 no. 1 (2000).

The Book of Mormon mentions synagogues in twenty-five passages. An important resource that may help us understand what the Book of Mormon means by the word synagogue is the body of research on biblical synagogues. This is especially true of research related to the years prior to the Babylonian captivity of the Jews, which began in 586 BC, since this is the time period when Lehi left Jerusalem. We would expect, therefore, that the nature of biblical synagogues before the captivity would have greatly influenced the concept of the synagogue that Lehi and his family took with them to the New World. In this article, William J. Adams Jr. details the historical development, nature, and cultural function of synagogues of the biblical era and relates them to the history, form, and religious function of synagogues in the New World.

Allen, J. Michael. “Joseph Fielding McConkie and Robert L. Millet, Doctrinal Commentary on the Book of Mormon. Vol. 3, Alma through Helaman.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 4 (1992): Article 55.

Review of Doctrinal Commentary on the Book of Mormon, vol. 3, Alma through Helaman (1991), by Joseph Fielding McConkie and Robert L. Millet.

Allen, James B. “Asked and Answered: A Response to Grant H. Palmer.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 1 (2004): Article 14.

Review of Grant H. Palmer. An Insider’s View of Mormon Origins.

Allen, James B. “Davis Bitton: His Scholarship and Faith.” The FARMS Review 19, no. 1 (2007): Article 3.

Assistant Church Historian James B. Allen shares his remarks that he made at Davis Bitton’s funeral on Bitton’s scholarly work.

Allred, Alma. “Coin of the Realm: Beware of Specious Specie.” FARMS Review of Books 12, no. 1 (2000): Article 12.

Review of “Scripture” (1988), by Norman L. Geisler

Allred, Philip A. “Alma’s Use of State in the Book of Mormon: Evidence of Multiple Authorship.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 5 no. 1 (1996).

Alma’s distinctive use of the word state in the Book of Mormon is present in his unique concentration of state, his tendency to reword with state, and his treatment of a shared topic involving state.

and, Kevin Christensen Shauna Christensen. “Nephite Feminism Revisited: Thoughts on Carol Lynn Pearson's View of Women in the Book of Mormon.” FARMS Review of Books 10, no. 2 (1998): Article 5.

Review of “Could Feminism Have Saved the Nephites?” (1996), by Carol Lynn Pearson

Andelin, Elaine A. “Sherrie Johnson, My First Scripture Stories.” FARMS Review of Books 8, no. 2 (1996): Article 16.

Review of My First Scripture Stories (1994), by Sherrie Johnson, illustrated by Tyler Lybbert

Andersen, Todd G. “Randall K. Mehew, A Most Convincing Witness: Reasons Why the Book of Mormon Is the True Word of God.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3 (1991): Article 10.

Review of A Most Convincing Witness: Reasons Why the Book of Mormon Is the True Word of God (1990), by Randall K. Mehew.

Anderson, Carma deJong. “Sidney B. Sperry: Memories.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 4 no. 1 (1995).

Personal reminiscences about Sidney B. Sperry.

Anderson, Lavina Fielding. “Paul R. Cheesman, ed., assisted by S. Kent Brown and Charles D. Tate, Jr., The Book of Mormon: The Keystone Scripture.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 1 (1989): Article 6.

Review of The Book of Mormon: The Keystone Scripture (1988), edited by Paul R. Cheesman and assisted by S. Kent Brown and Charles D. Tate Jr.

Anderson, Richard Lloyd. “Attempts to Redefine the Experience of the Eight Witnesses.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 14 no. 1 (2005).

Skeptics have misused some historical sources as they attempt to reverse the Eight Witnesses’ statements about their physical contact with the Book of Mormon plates. The Eight Witnesses speak of viewing the plates themselves with unobstructed vision. They left 10 specific statements of handling the plates. This article provides an overview of the statements and experiences of the Eight Witnesses and the arguments of their critics, both then and now. Their unequivocal testimonies resist revisionists’ attempts to portray their experience as mere illusion or deception.

Anderson, Richard Lloyd. “Mark D. Thomas, “A Rhetorical Approach to the Book of Mormon: Rediscovering Nephite Sacramental Language,” Pp. 53-80.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 6, no. 1 (1994): Article 13.

Review of “A Rhetorical Approach to the Book of Mormon: Rediscovering Nephite Sacramental Language” (1993), by Mark D. Thomas.

Anderson, Richard Lloyd. “Probing the Lives of Christ and Joseph Smith.” The FARMS Review 21, no. 2 (2009): Article 3.

This Annual Neal A. Maxwell Lecture was given at Brigham Young University on 20 March 2009. Anderson respects both the Savior, Jesus Christ, and Joseph Smith, seer and revelator. He lays a foundation for the four Gospels and their historical authenticity. He notes the abundance of materials available about Joseph Smith and details his First Vision, the accounts of the Book of Mormon witnesses, sacred influences in Joseph’s life, and the significance of the events at Carthage.

Anderson, Richard Lloyd. “Rodger I. Anderson, Joseph Smith's New York Reputation Reexamined.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3 (1991): Article 4.

Review of Joseph Smith's New York Reputation Reexamined (1990), by Rodger I. Anderson.

Anderson, Richard Lloyd. “Sidney B. Sperry: Steadfast Scholar.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 4 no. 1 (1995).

Personal reminiscences about Sidney B. Sperry.

Anderson, Richard Lloyd and Scott H. Faulring. “The Prophet Joseph Smith and His Plural Wives.” FARMS Review of Books 10, no. 2 (1998): Article 7.

Review of In Sacred Loneliness: The Plural Wives of Joseph Smith (1997), by Todd M. Compton

Archer, John B., John L. Hilton et al. “Comparative Power of Three Author-Attribution Techniques for Differentiating Authors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6 no. 1 (1997).

Over the last twenty years, various objective author-attribution techniques have been applied to the English Book of Mormon in order to shed light on the question of multiple authorship of Book of Mormon texts. Two methods, one based on rates of use of noncontextual words and one based on word-pattern ratios, measure patterns consistent with multiple authorship in the Book of Mormon. Another method, based on vocabulary-richness measures, suggests that only one author is involved. These apparently contradictory results are reconciled by showing that for texts of known authorship, the method based on vocabulary-richness measures is not as powerful in discerning differences among authors as are the other methods, especially for works translated into English by a single translator.

Argetsinger, Gerald S. “The Hill Cumorah Pageant: A Historical Perspective.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 13 no. 1 (2004).

Almost every summer since 1935, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has staged a pageant at the Hill Cumorah. This article starts with the history of the pageant from its beginnings in the 1920s as a Cumorah Conference of the Eastern States Mission convened by mission president B. H. Roberts and held at the Smith Family Farm. Details about the pageant’s move to the Hill Cumorah as well as scripts, directors, music, costumes, props, set design, lighting, and choreography are included. The author concludes with the details of retiring the original script after 50 years of use and of the challenges of producing and revitalizing the new pageant while maintaining its purpose as a missionary tool.

Arnold, Marilyn. “The Book of Mormon: Passport to Discipleship.” In Mormon Studies Review 23, no. 1 (2011): Article 0.

Arnold gives personal reflections on the compatibility of scholarship and discipleship, the latter deepened by earnest study of the Book of Mormon. Neal A. Maxwell’s gift for words is illustrated. As an inex-haustible source of insight and delight, the Book of Mormon rewards close reading, as is apparent by a look at even the minor characters in the narrative. This Annual Neal A. Maxwell Institute Lecture was originally given on 10 March 2011 at Brigham Young University.

Arnold, Marilyn. “Hidden Ancient Records Abound.” FARMS Review of Books 13, no. 2 (2001): Article 6.

Review of The Book of Mormon and Other Hidden Books: “Out of the Darkness unto Light” (2000), by John A. Tvedtnes

Arnold, Marilyn. “Unlocking the Sacred Text.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 1 (1992).

Literary analysis provides useful tools in the study of sacred texts, including the Book of Mormon. For the author, three transforming events that enhanced her study of the Book of Mormon included reading the book in earnest as a complex and masterful literary text, the entrance of the Spirit into her study of the book, and a prayerful desire to experience the great change of heart described by King Benjamin and Alma. Nephi begins his record with sincerity and honesty and serves notice that he intends to prepare a true record. The opposition between Nephi and his brothers Laman and Lemuel illustrates well Lehi’s teachings on the necessity of opposition in all things. More subtly, the reader notes a contrast between the characters and personalities of Nephi and Jacob. Jacob is portrayed as an empathetic and compassionate person who was tutored by exile and isolation.

Arnold, Marilyn. “Words words words: Hugh Nibley on the Book of Mormon.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture 19, no. 2 (2010): 4–21.

On 25 March 2010, in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium, Brigham Young University, Marilyn Arnold presented this lecture as part of a series honoring Hugh W. Nibley on the 100th anniversary of his birth (27 March 2010).

In this lecture commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of Hugh Nibley’s birth, Arnold paints a picture of him by discussing not only his scholarship but also his very unique, and often humorous, writing and speaking styles and his consistent jabs at academia. According to Arnold, who read everything Nibley had written on the Book of Mormon, Nibley was never more eloquent or serious than when he defended that book. Often, Arnold notes, his defenses and other writings are illuminated by literary devices, including the use of parable, epistle, and Platonic dialogue.

Keywords: Book of Mormon;writing style;scholarship;Book of Mormon;Dialogue;Epistle;Literary;Literature;Parable
Arts, Valentin. “A Third Jaredite Record: The Sealed Portion of the Gold Plates.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 11 no. 1 (2002).

In the Book of Mormon, two records (a large engraved stone and twenty-four gold plates) contain the story of an ancient civilization known as the Jaredites. There appears to be evidence of an unpublished third record that provides more information on this people and on the history of the world. When the brother of Jared received a vision of Jesus Christ, he was taught many things but was instructed not to share them with the world until the time of his death. The author proposes that the brother of Jared did, in fact, write those things down shortly before his death and then buried them, along with the interpreting stones, to be revealed to the world according to the timing of the Lord.

Asay, Ronald W. “Bassett's Latter-day Commentary on the Book of Mormon.” FARMS Review of Books 14, no. 1 (2002): Article 3.

Review of Latter-day Commentary on the Book of Mormon: Insights from Prophets, Church Leaders, and Scholars (1999), by K. Douglas Bassett

Ash, Michael R. “Lehi of Africa.” FARMS Review of Books 13, no. 2 (2001): Article 4.

Review of Manifestations Mysteries Revealed: An Account of Bible Truth and the Book of Mormon Prophecies (2000), by Embaya Melekin

Ashton, Alan C.Book of Mormon Reference Library (CD-ROM); Book of Mormon Studybase (CD-ROM); LDS Collectors Library 1995 Edition (CD-ROM).” FARMS Review of Books 8, no. 2 (1996): Article 17.

Review of Book of Mormon Reference Library (1995), by Deseret Book; Book of Mormon Studybase (1995), by Bookcraft; and LDS Collectors Library 1995 Edition (1995), by Infobases

Ashurst-McGee, Mark. “Moroni as Angel and as Treasure Guardian.” The FARMS Review 18, no. 1 (2006): Article 6.
Ashurst-McGee, Mark. “A One-sided View of Mormon Origins.” The FARMS Review 15, no. 2 (2003): Article 16.

Review of Grant H. Palmer. An Insider’s View of Mormon Origins.

Aston, Warren P. “Across Arabia with Lehi and Sariah: “Truth Shall Spring out of the Earth”.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 15 no. 2 (2006).

Utilizing techniques adapted from literary criticism, this paper investigates the narrative structure of the Book of Mormon, particularly the relationship between Nephi’s first-person account and Mormon’s third-person abridgment. A comparison of the order and relative prominence of material from 1 Nephi 12 with the content of Mormon’s historical record reveals that Mormon may have intentionally patterned the structure of his narrative after Nephi’s prophetic vision—a conclusion hinted at by Mormon himself in his editorial comments. With this understanding, readers of the Book of Mormon can see how Mormon’s sometimes unusual editorial decisions are actually guided by an overarching desire to show that Nephi’s prophecies have been dramatically and literally fulfilled in the history of his people.

Aston, Warren P. “The Arabian Bountiful Discovered? Evidence for Nephi’s Bountiful.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 7 no. 1 (1998).

According to the Book of Mormon, a land named “Bountiful” was a fertile site on the Arabian Peninsula with timber, fresh water, and ore where Nephi built a ship to carry Lehi’s group to the New World. In the seemingly barren land of the southern Arabian peninsula, a site that appears to correspond to the description in Nephi’s record has been identified on the remote southern coast of the country of Oman. Kharfot may not be the exact location of Bountiful, but its discovery does show that a place matching the criteria for Bountiful does exist.

Aston, Warren P. “Identifying Our Best Candidate for Nephi’s Bountiful.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 17 no. 1 (2008).

Scholars have presented and defended different viewpoints concerning the Lehite journey and the location of Nephi’s Bountiful. Aston explains that some of these arguments contain factual errors, such as claims regarding fertility and timber for Nephi’s ship and a lack of accounting for all possibilities. Discrepancies in theories and differences in opinion do not lessen the worth of all that has been found in Arabia and the supported theories, but acknowledging the sometimes contrary data will aid the search for the best candidate for Nephi’s Bountiful.

Aston, Warren P. “Lynn M. and Hope A. Hilton. Discovering Lehi: New Evidence of Lehi and Nephi in Arabia.” FARMS Review of Books 9, no. 1 (1997): Article 6.

Review of Discovering Lehi: New Evidence of Lehi and Nephi in Arabia (1996), by Lynn M. and Hope A. Hilton

Aston, Warren P. “Newly Found Altars from Nahom.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 10 no. 2 (2001).

Ancient altars in Yemen bear the inscription Nihm, a variant of the word Nahom. According to the Book of Mormon, one of the travelers in Lehi’s group, Ishmael, was buried at a place called Nahom. Because the altar has been dated to about the sixth or seventh century BC (the time of Lehi’s journey), it is plausible that the Nihm referred to on the altar could be the same place written about in the Book of Mormon. This article discusses the discovery site, the appearance of the altars, and the process of dating the altars, as well as the place-name Nahom in its Book of Mormon setting.

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Bachman, Danel W. “The Other Side of the Coin: A Source Review of Norman Geisler's Chapter.” FARMS Review of Books 12, no. 1 (2000): Article 13.

Review of “Scripture” (1988), by Norman L. Geisler

Bachman, Danel W. “Prologue to the Study of Joseph Smith's Marital Theology.” FARMS Review of Books 10, no. 2 (1998): Article 8.

Review of In Sacred Loneliness: The Plural Wives of Joseph Smith (1997), by Todd M. Compton

Ball, Russell H. “An Hypothesis concerning the Three Days of Darkness among the Nephites.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2 no. 1 (1993).

Aspects of the three days of darkness following the three-hour period of intense destruction described principally in 3 Nephi include: (1) the strange absence of rain among the destructive mechanisms described; (2) the source of the intense lightning, which seems to be unaccompanied by rain; (3) a mechanism to account for the inundation of the cities of Onihah, Mocum, and Jerusalem, which were not among the cities which “sunk in the depths of the sea”; and (4) the absence in the histories of contemporary European and Asiatic civilizations of corresponding events, which are repeatedly characterized in 3 Nephi as affecting “the face of the whole earth.”

Ball, Terry. “Letter to the Editor.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 18 no. 1 (2009).

A critique of Warren Aston’s “Identifying Our Best Candidate for Nephi’s Bountiful,” published in volume 17/1–2 of the Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture.

Ball, Terry B. “Nibley and the Environment.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture 20, no. 2 (2011): 16–29.

Hugh Nibley cared deeply about creation and was passionate about our stewardship over the earth. His arguments in defense of the environment were informed by the disciplines he knew best: history, philosophy, and theology. From his study, research, and reasoning, Nibley drew several principles that seem to have directed his thoughts and crafted his sense of environmental stewardship. Four of these principles are discussed in this paper: (1) humankind has a divine mandate to properly care for creation; (2) humankind’s spiritual health and environmental heath are linked; (3) creation obeys, reverences, and provides for humankind, as humankind righteously cares for creation; and (4) humankind should not sacrifice environmental health for temporal wealth.

A review of Hugh Nibley’s thoughts and writings on the environment.

Keywords: stewardship for Creation;environment;Terry B. Ball;Divine Mandate;Environment;Stewardship
Ball, Terry B. “Stephen D. Ricks and John W. Welch, eds., The Allegory of the Olive Tree: The Olive, the Bible, and Jacob 5.” FARMS Review of Books 8, no. 1 (1996): Article 6.

Review of The Allegory of the Olive Tree: The Olive, the Bible, and Jacob 5 (1994), edited by Stephen D. Ricks and John W. Welch.

Ball, Terry B., Kent S. Brown et al. “Planning Research on Oman: The End of Lehi’s Trail.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 7 no. 1 (1998).

In February 1998, five Brigham Young University professors spent more than a week together in southern Oman to collect data for future research projects in the area, which seems to correspond to the end of Lehi’s trail in the Old World. Future research must be performed in a professional manner and seek to reconstruct that part of the world in 600 BC. Botanical, archaeological, chronological, mineralogical, geological, and inscriptional studies in the area would depend on acquiring sponsors in Oman and on the availability of resources.

Barksdale, D. L. “A Word to Our Anti-Mormon Friends.” FARMS Review of Books 12, no. 1 (2000): Article 18.

Review of “A Word to Our Mormon Friends” (1998)

Barney, Kevin L. “A Book of Mormon Casebook.” The FARMS Review 21, no. 1 (2009): Article 8.

Review of John W. Welch. The Legal Cases in the Book of Mormon.

Barney, Kevin L. “Divine Discourse Directed at a Prophet’s Posterity in the Plural: Further Light on Enallage.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6 no. 2 (1997).

A follow-up on a previous article on enallage provides further strength for a pattern of a speech to a prophet in which later verses seem to be addressed to both the prophet and his posterity by use of the plural ye.

Barney, Kevin L. “An Elegant Presentation.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 1 (2004): Article 3.

Review of Grant Hardy, ed. The Book of Mormon: A Reader’s Edition.

Barney, Kevin L. “Enallage in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 3 no. 1 (1994).

Thomas W. Brookbank long ago suggested that enallage, meaning the substitution of the singular for the plural or vice versa for rhetorical effect, is present in the Book of Mormon. Enallage appears to exist as a prominent, meaningful rhetorical figure in the Bible, but its presence in the Book of Mormon is more difficult to demonstrate given the pronominal variation found in the Book of Mormon, a factor that Brookbank did not account for in his study. Nevertheless, a careful reading of contextual and verbal clues reveals that enallage does indeed seem to exist in some passages in the Book of Mormon. An awareness of this usage is important for a full under- standing of such passages.

Barney, Kevin L. “Finally!” The FARMS Review 19, no. 2 (2007): Article 16.

Review of Richard Neitzel Holzapfel, Eric D. Huntsman, and Thomas A. Wayment. Jesus Christ and the World of the New Testament; An Illustrated Reference for Latter-day Saints.

Barney, Kevin L. “The Foundation of Our Religion.” The FARMS Review 18, no. 2 (2006): Article 6.

Review of John W. Welch and Erick B. Carlson, eds. Opening the Heavens: Accounts of Divine Manifestations, 1820-1844.

Barney, Kevin L. “Isaiah Interwoven.” The FARMS Review 15, no. 1 (2003): Article 18.

Review of Donald W. Parry. Harmonizing Isaiah: Combining Ancient Sources.

Barney, Kevin L. “A More Responsible Critique.” The FARMS Review 15, no. 1 (2003): Article 11.

Review of Thomas J. Finley. “Does the Book of Mormon Reflect an Ancient Near Eastern Background?” and David J. Shepherd. “Rendering Fiction: Translation, Pseudotranslation, and the Book of Mormon.” In The New Mormon Challenge: Responding to the Latest Defenses of a Fast-Growing Movement

Barney, Kevin L. “On Elkenah as Canaanite El.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 19 no. 1 (2010).

Many easily recognizable Hebrew words and names can be found in the Book of Abraham. One name that hasn’t had a concrete meaning attached to it, however, is Elkenah. In this article, Barney addresses whether Elkenah is a person, place, or name; what its possible linguistic structures are; and what it might mean. Most importantly, Barney links Elkenah with the Canaanite god El and the attending cult—a cult that practiced human sacrifice. This has significant ramifications for the Book of Abraham, which has been criticized for its inclusion of human sacrifice. Assuming a northern location for the city Ur and taking Elkenah as the Canaanite El resolve the issue of child sacrifice in the Book of Abraham.

Barney, Kevin L. “Poetic Diction and Parallel Word Pairs in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 4 no. 2 (1995).

Hebrew poetry is based on various patterns of parallelism. Parallel lines are in turn created by the use of parallel words, that is, pairs of words bearing generally synonymous or antithetic meanings. Since the 1930s, scholars have come to realize that many of these “word pairs” were used repeatedly in a formulaic fashion as the basic building blocks of different parallel lines. The Book of Mormon reflects numerous parallel structures, including synonymous parallelism, antithetic parallelism, and chiasmus. As word pairs are a function of parallelism, the presence of such parallel structures in the Book of Mormon suggests the possible presence of word pairs within those structures. This article catalogs the use of forty word pairs that occur in parallel collocations both in the Book of Mormon and in Hebrew poetry.

Barney, Kevin L. “Seeking Joseph Smith’s Voice.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 15 no. 1 (2006).

Royal Skousen’s work on his Book of Mormon critical text project demonstrates that he is an able textual critic who employs sound judgment and proven methods to uncover the original text of the Book of Mormon. In many cases, these decisions seem counterintuitive to untrained readers, but Skousen correctly applies the principle that a more awkward reading is most likely original. He also shows his ability to make conjectural emendations for which no direct textual evidence is available. In every case, Skousen clearly lays out his reasoning so that readers who disagree with his inferences can examine the evidence for themselves to reach their own conclusions. This paper goes on to speculate that Skousen’s work may in time bring the LDS and RLDS editions of the Book of Mormon closer together textually. In the end, the critical text project is a superb work of scholarship on par with the standard works of biblical textual criticism.

Barney, Kevin L. “A Seemingly Strange Story Illuminated.” FARMS Review of Books 13, no. 1 (2001): Article 3.

Review of The Book of Mormon and Other Hidden Books: “Out of Darkness unto Light” (2000), by John A. Tvedtnes

Barney, Kevin L. “The Sperry Symposium and the New Testament.” The FARMS Review 19, no. 2 (2007): Article 15.

Review of Frank F. Judd Jr. and Gaye Strathearn, eds. Sperry Symposium Classics: The New Testament. and Review of Kent P. Jackson and Frank F. Judd Jr., eds. How the New Testament Came to Be: The 35th Annual Brigham Young University Sidney B. Sperry Symposium.

Barney, Quinten. “Sobek: The Idolatrous God of Pharaoh Amenemhet III.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 22 no. 2 (2013).

The Joseph Smith Papyri have been a hot topic among scholars, especially since the resurfacing of fragments of the collection in the late 1960s. The facsimiles in particular have received much attention in scholarly circles, especially in relation to their accompanying explanations given by Joseph Smith. This article contributes evidence of the accuracy of Smith’s explanations, despite his lack of knowledge concerning Egyptology. Specifically, this article discusses the relationship between “ the idolatrous god of pharaoh” in Facsimile 1 with the Egyptian crocodile god, Sobek (also known as Sebek, Sobk, and Suchos), and his connection to the Middle Kingdom pharaoh Amenemhet III. Evidence both from historical texts and from archaeology demonstrates the important role Sobek played in the Fayyum region during the reign of Amenemhet III. Sobek was thus a likely candidate for the “ idolatrous god of pharaoh” of Facsimile 1 in the Book of Abraham.

Baron, Ross David. “Melodie Moench Charles and the Humanist Worldview.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 7, no. 1 (1995): Article 8.

Review of ?Book of Mormon Christology? (1993), by Melodie Moench Charles.

Bastian, Lewis M. “Eldin Ricks, Book of Mormon: Wide-Margin Edition.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): Article 26.

Review of Book of Mormon: Wide-Margin Edition (1987), by Eldin Ricks.

Baugh, Alexander L. “Kirtland Camp, 1838: Bringing the Poor to Missouri.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 22 no. 1 (2013).

In the spring and summer of 1838, the presidency of the Seventy in Kirtland organized Kirtland Camp to assist many of the poorer Church members living in Ohio to relocate to northern Missouri, a trek of more than eight hundred miles. Comprised of over five hundred individuals, including families, Kirtland Camp was the first Mormon company organized to assist in the migration of the Latter-day Saints in the history of the Church.

Beck, John M. “E. Douglas Clark, The Grand Design: America from Columbus to Zion.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 5 (1993): Article 30.

Review of The Grand Design: America from Columbus to Zion (1992), by E. Douglas Clark.

Beck, John M. “Robert E. Hales and Sandra L. Hales, A Standard unto My People.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 4 (1992): Article 47.

Review of A Standard unto My People (1990), by Robert E. Hales and Sandra L. Hales.

Bell, Elouise. “Chris Heimerdinger, Tennis Shoes among the Nephites: A Novel.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): Article 13.

Review of Tennis Shoes among the Nephites: A Novel (1989), by Chris Heimerdinger.

Bell, James P. “A Reader’s Library: Efficacious Scholarship.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 1 (1992).

Bell reviews the following books about Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon: Susan Easton Black and Charles D. Tate Jr.’s edited volume Joseph Smith: The Prophet, the Man; Scot Facer Proctor and Maurine Jensen Proctor’s edition of The Revised and Enhanced History of Joseph Smith by His Mother; John W. Welch and Stephen D. Ricks’s edited volume King Benjamin’s Speech: “That Ye May Learn Wisdom”; and Donald W. Parry and John W. Welch’s edited volume Isaiah in the Book of Mormon.

Belnap, Dan. ““And it came to pass…”: The Sociopolitical Events in the Book of Mormon Leading to the Eighteenth Year of the Reign of the Judges.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 23 no. 1 (2014).
Belnap, Daniel. ““I Will Contend with Them That Contendeth with Thee”: The Divine Warrior in Jacob’s Speech of 2 Nephi 6–10.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 17 no. 1 (2008).

At the time Jacob gave his speech in 2 Nephi 6–10, the Nephites had already been driven from two lands of inheritance and felt an ongoing concern of being cut off from God’s promises. Belnap illustrates that Jacob’s speech answers these concerns through emphasizing and expounding on the covenantal relationship made possible by God acting as the Divine Warrior. Jacob quotes Isaiah passages in his discourse and in some instances makes his own additions to emphasize important aspects. He illustrates how the Divine Warrior provides the hardships, knowledge, and power for an individual to become a divine warrior, and he discusses the Divine Warrior’s defeat over the monster of Death. The promises made by the Divine Warrior can provide hope and assurance to all.

Bennett, Richard E. ““A Nation Now Extinct,” American Indian Origin Theories as of 1820: Samuel L. Mitchill, Martin Harris, and the New York Theory.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 20 no. 2 (2011).

This paper probes the theories of the origin of the American Indian up to the time of the translation and publication of the Book of Mormon. It covers some three hundred years of development, looking at many different theories, including the predominant theory of the lost tribes of Israel, which was in decline among most leading scientific observers in the early nineteenth century. The paper covers new ground in showing that Professor Samuel L. Mitchill, formerly of Columbia College, had concluded that two main groups of people once dominated the Americas—the Tartars of northern Asia and the Australasians of the Polynesian islands. Furthermore, they fought one another for many years, culminating in great battles of extermination in what later became upstate New York. This New York theory has much in common with the Book of Mormon. While visiting Professor Charles Anthon in New York in 1828, Martin Harris also met with Mitchill, an encounter that lent support to Harris’s work on the Book of Mormon.

Bennett, Richard E. “Raising Kane.” Mormon Studies Review 23, no. 1 (2011): Article 10.

Review of Matthew J. Grow. “Liberty to the Downtrodden”: Thomas L. Kane, Romantic Reformer.

Bennett, Robert R. “Science vs. Mormonism: The Dangers of Dogmatism and Sloppy Reading.” The FARMS Review 18, no. 2 (2006): Article 3.

Review of Duwayne R. Anderson. Farewell to Eden: Coming to Terms with Mormonism and Science.

Benson, Ezra Taft, Gordon B. Hinckley, and Thomas S. Monson. “Modern-Language Editions of the Book of Mormon Discouraged.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 7, no. 1 (1995): Article 3.

In this statement, the First Presidency requests that the Book of Mormon not be rewritten into familiar or modern English because of ?risks that this process may introduce doctrinal errors or obscure evidence of its ancient origin.?

Benson, RoseAnn and Stephen D. Ricks. “Treaties and Covenants: Ancient Near Eastern Legal Terminology in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 14 no. 1 (2005).

Ancient Near Eastern treaties and Old Testament covenants exhibit many of the same literary elements. Of particular interest is the use of the Hebrew word y?da? ,“to know,” when it signifies “to enter into a binding agreement.” The use of this word in both treaties and scriptures supports the notion that prophets spoke of holy covenants using language that framed responsibilities between God and his people in legal terms. The Book of Mormon usage of to know reflects similar intent. This article discusses the background of the word to know, compares treaties with covenants, discusses to know in connection with ancient Near Eastern treaties and biblical covenants, and assesses to know in Book of Mormon covenants.

Benson, Sherrie Mills. “The Zoramite Separation: A Sociological Perspective.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 14 no. 1 (2005).

The Zoramites’ transformation from quiescent dissidents to aggressive enemies of their former brethren and mother culture is a powerful study of human nature. The Book of Mormon does not delineate the reasons that the Zoramites separated themselves from the larger population at Zarahemla, but they obviously felt a great deal of animosity toward their former brethren. Perhaps they had been marginalized in Nephite society because of their ethnicity. They constructed a culture that deliberately differed in many ways from that at Zarahemla, and they expelled all who were converted by Alma. Because of their extreme hatred of the Nephites, the Zoramites ultimately joined with the Lamanites as fierce enemies of the Nephites.

Benz, Ernst and Alan F. Keele.Imago dei: Man as the Image of God.” The FARMS Review 17, no. 1 (2005): Article 10.

Ernst Benz originally presented this paper at the Eranos conference held in Ascona, Switzerland, in 1969. (See the publisher’s Web site at www.daimon.ch for more information about these annual Eranos conferences and for listings of Eranos yearbooks.) Ernst Benz’s collected Eranos lectures are found in his book Urbild und Abbild: Der Mensch und die mythische Welt (Leiden: Brill, 1974). This essay is on pages 475–508. The astute reader will pick up some of Benz’s misconceptions about Latter-day Saint beliefs.

Berkey, Kimberly M. “Temporality and Fulfillment in 3 Nephi 1.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 24 no. 1 (2015).
Berkey, Kimberly M. “Untangling Alma 13:3.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 23 no. 1 (2014).
Berrett, LaMar C. “New Light: The So-Called Lehi Cave.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 1 (1992).

Berrett discusses point by point reasons why an ancient burial complex at Khirbet Beit Lei, sometimes called “Lehi’s cave,” is unlikely to have Book of Mormon connections. Brown describes a carved altar inscribed to the tribe Nihm discovered in the southwest Arabian peninsula (Yemen)—this location may be the place Nahom where Nephi’s father-in-law, Ishmael, was buried, according to the Book of Mormon record. The characters on the Anthon transcript reportedly taken by Martin Harris to New York to show to Professor Charles Anthon bear resemblance to characters on two Mexican seals made of baked clay. Szink identifies another possible Semitic source for the name Alma in the tablets of Ebla uncovered in Syria.

Bickmore, Barry R. “Clearing up Misconceptions.” FARMS Review of Books 13, no. 2 (2001): Article 16.

Review of Pope Fictions: Answers to 30 Myths and Misconceptions about the Papacy (1999), by Patrick Madrid

Bickmore, Barry R. “Not Completely Worthless.” FARMS Review of Books 12, no. 1 (2000): Article 15.

Review of “Christ” (1998), by Ron Rhodes

Bickmore, Barry R. “Of Simplicity, Oversimplification, and Monotheism.” The FARMS Review 15, no. 1 (2003): Article 14.

Review of Paul Owen. “Monotheism, Mormonism, and the New Testament Witness.” In The New Mormon Challenge: Responding to the Latest Defenses of a Fast-Growing Movement.

Bickmore, Barry R. “A Passion for Faultfinding: The Deconversion of a Former Catholic Priest.” FARMS Review of Books 13, no. 2 (2001): Article 17.

Review of When Mormons Call: Answering Mormon Missionaries at Your Door (1999), and Inside Mormonism: What Mormons Really Believe (1999), by Isaiah Bennett

Bickmore, Barry R. ““Them Sneaky Early Christians”.” FARMS Review of Books 12, no. 1 (2000): Article 7.

Review of Hidden Wisdom: Esoteric Traditions and the Roots of Christian Mysticism (1996), by Guy G. Stroumsa

Bitton, Davis. “B. H. Roberts and Book of Mormon Scholarship.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1992).

Brigham Henry Roberts, a Book of Mormon scholar in the early twentieth century, was a pioneer in his field. He conducted research regarding the culture and the geography of the Book of Mormon peoples in an attempt to determine the setting of the Book of Mormon. His extensive work in this area has significantly influenced the progress of Book of Mormon research. Roberts also enthusiastically defended the book when others criticized it. He was able to do so effectively because of his study of and familiarity with the Book of Mormon. Roberts did, however, have a few limitations, the most detrimental being his unfounded assumption that “the narrow neck of land” in the Book of Mormon is the Isthmus of Panama. Yet, Roberts’s pioneering efforts remain today a crucial catalyst to modern analytical studies of the Book of Mormon.

Bitton, Davis. “Brent Lee Metcalfe, ed., New Approaches to the Book of Mormon: Explorations in Critical Methodology.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 6, no. 1 (1994): Article 3.

Review of New Approaches to the Book of Mormon: Explorations in Critical Methodology (1993), edited by Brent Lee Metcalfe.

Bitton, Davis. “The Charge of a Man with a Broken Lance (But Look What He Doesn’t Tell Us).” The FARMS Review 15, no. 2 (2003): Article 14.

Review of Grant H. Palmer. An Insider’s View of Mormon Origins.

Bitton, Davis. “George Q. Cannon and the Faithful Narrative of Mormon History.” FARMS Review of Books 14, no. 1 (2002): Article 15.

Review of Life of Joseph Smith the Prophet (1888; 1986), by George Q. Cannon

Bitton, Davis. “I Don’t Have a Testimony of the History of the Church.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 2 (2004): Article 18.

Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Foundation for Apologetic Information and Research (FAIR), Sandy, Utah, 5 August 2004 (see www.fair-lds.org). Used by permission. Also published in Meridian Magazine Online (see www.ldsmag.com). Used by permission. Copyright 2004 Davis Bitton.

Bitton, Davis. “Mormon Anti-Intellectualism: A Reply.” FARMS Review of Books 13, no. 2 (2001): Article 8.

Review of “Anti-Intellectualism in Mormon History” (1966), by Davis Bitton

Bitton, Davis. “Spotting an Anti-Mormon Book.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 1 (2004): Article 16.

Davis Bitton provides a few guidelines to help readers determine whether a given text is anti-Mormon and to explain how readers should approach such texts.

Black, Susan Easton. “Eugene England, Converted to Christ through the Book of Mormon.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): Article 10.

Review of Converted to Christ through the Book of Mormon (1989), edited by Eugene England.

Black, Susan Easton and Larry C. Porter. ““For the Sum of Three Thousand Dollars”.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 14 no. 2 (2005).

The familiar narrative of how Martin Harris mortgaged his farm to pay the printing cost of the first five thousand copies of the Book of Mormon overlooks details that make possible a fuller appreciation of his key role in the restoration of the gospel. Financially and otherwise, Harris was uniquely situated to secure the publisher’s note and relieve the financial tension that imperiled the book’s publication. Details of his family background, land ownership, business enterprises, and generosity are reviewed. Despite his pattern of vacillating in his religious commitments, his loss of 116 pages of translated manuscript, his exposure to public ridicule, and his fracturing marriage, Harris proved willing and able to honor the mortgage agreement and the Lord’s directives to him in Doctrine and Covenants, section 19. He did so at great personal cost when all attempts to recoup the publication costs failed and the shared financial responsibility unexpectedly fell solely on him. The view is expressed that Harris was raised up by the Lord to assist the Prophet Joseph Smith by securing and then personally financing the first publication of the Restoration.

Black, Susan Easton and Larry C. Porter. ““Rest Assured, Martin Harris Will Be Here in Time”.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 20 no. 1 (2011).

Martin Harris, one of the Three Witnesses of the Book of Mormon, was the only witness to join the Saints in Utah. This journey was commenced only after missionaries passed through Kirtland for decades and attempted to convince Harris to make the journey to the Salt Lake Valley. Although each missionary over the course of decades was unsuccessful in his attempts to convince the impoverished, lonely Harris to go to Utah, each was spiritually renewed through the ever-present testimony of the witness of the Book of Mormon and “custodian” of the Kirtland Temple. This is the testimony Harris spread even as he traveled to Utah after a former acquaintance of his finally convinced him to make the trip at the age of eighty-seven. Finally in Utah, Harris enjoyed again the blessings of the church and continued to pronounce, even until he died, his powerful testimony of the Book of Mormon.

Boegh, Ben and Jonathan P. Benson. “Letters.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 20 no. 2 (2011).

Letters praising the Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture and responding to articles published therein.

Boehm, Bruce J. “Wanderers in the Promised Land: A Study of the Exodus Motif in the Book of Mormon and Holy Bible.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 3 no. 1 (1994).

Lehi’s exodus to the promised land is only the first of a series of exoduses occurring throughout the Book of Mormon. Indeed, Lehi’s exodus becomes mere precedent for later flights into the wilderness by Nephi, Mosiah, Alma1, Limhi, and the Anti-Nephi-Lehies. For the Nephites, continuing exodus is not merely historical fact. Understanding the biblical exodus as a type and shadow, the Nephites come to see their wandering as a metaphor of their spiritual condition. Thus, even centuries after Lehi’s arrival in the promised land, Nephite prophets recognize their status as “wanderers in a strange land” (Alma 13:23). As did Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, the Nephites also looked beyond their temporal land of promise “for a city which hath foundations, whose builder and maker is God” (Hebrews 11:10).

Bokovoy, David. “From Distance to Proximity: A Poetic Function of Enallage in the Hebrew Bible and the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 9 no. 1 (2000).

This essay analyzes examples of poetry in the Hebrew Bible and the Book of Mormon that do not conform to the standards to which prose is typically confined. Each of these poems contains a syntactic device that scholars have come to identify by the term enallage (Greek for “interchange”). Rather than being a case of textual corruption or blatant error, the grammatical variance attested in these passages provides a poetic articulation of a progression from distance to proximity.

Bokovoy, David E.The Bible vs. the Book of Mormon: Still Losing the Battle.” The FARMS Review 18, no. 1 (2006): Article 4.

Review of Joel P. Kramer and Scott R. Johnson. The Bible vs. the Book of Mormon.

Bokovoy, David E. “The Word and the Seed: The Theological Use of Biblical Creation in Alma 32.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 23 no. 1 (2014).
Bokovoy, David E. “Ye Really Are Gods': A Response to Michael Heiser concerning the LDS Use of Psalm 82 and the Gospel of John.” The FARMS Review 19, no. 1 (2007): Article 15.

Review of Michael S. Helser. “You've Seen One Elohim, You've Seen Them All? A Critique of Mormonism's Apologetic Use of Psalm 82.”

Boone, David F. ““A Man Raised Up”: The Role of Willard W. Bean in the Acquisition of the Hill Cumorah.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 13 no. 1 (2004).

After nearly three-quarters of a century, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints sought to reestablish its presence in the Palmyra area by sending Willard W. Bean and his family to live in the newly acquired Joseph Smith Sr. home in Manchester, New York. Bean soon discovered he had a difficult task set before him because Joseph Smith and Mormonism were held in derision in Palmyra. During the twenty-four years that the Bean family lived in the home, they overcame ostracization through cultivating friendships and preaching the gospel. Willard Bean was instrumental in the acquisition of additional properties of historical significance, including the Hill Cumorah. He restored and improved the Hill Cumorah and nearby acreage. Having completed their assignment to make friends for the church in Palmyra and to build up the church there, the Beans were released from their mission in 1939.

Bowen, Matthew L. “Becoming Sons and Daughters at God’s Right Hand: King Benjamin’s Rhetorical Wordplay on His Own Name.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 21 no. 2 (2012).

Royal sonship is a key theme of Mosiah 1–6, including King Benjamin’s seminal address at the temple in Zarahemla (Mosiah 2–5) on the occasion of his son Mosiah’s enthronement. Benjamin, however, caps this covenant sermon, not with an assertion of his son’s royal status and privileges, but with a radical declaration of his people’s royal rebirth (or adoption) as “ the children of Christ, his sons and his daughters” (Mosiah 5:7) and their potential enthronement at God’s “ right hand” (5:9). Similar to rhetorical wordplay involving proper names found in the Bible, the Book of Mormon, and other ancient texts, Benjamin’s juxtaposition of “sons”/“daughters” and the “right hand” constitutes a deliberate wordplay on his own name, traditionally taken to mean “son of the right hand.” The name of Christ, rather than Benjamin’s own name, is given to all his people as a new name—a “throne” name. However, he warns them against refusing to take upon them this throne name and thus being found “on the left hand of God” (5:10), a warning that also constitutes an allusion to his name. Benjamin’s ultimate hope is for his people’s royal, divine sonship/daughterhood to be eternally “sealed.”

Boyce, Duane. “A Betrayal of Trust.” FARMS Review of Books 9, no. 2 (1997): Article 17.

Review of The Mormon Hierarchy: Extensions of Power (1997), by D. Michael Quinn.

Boyce, Duane. “Do Liberal Economic Policies Approximate the Law of Consecration?” The FARMS Review 21, no. 1 (2009): Article 15.

Also available for free at BYU ScholarsArchive.

A review of Approaching Zion, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 9.

Keywords: Law of Consecration;review
Boyce, Duane. “Of Science, Scripture, and Surprise.” The FARMS Review 20, no. 2 (2008): Article 9.

Review of Trent D. Stephens and D. Jeffrey Meldrum. Evolution and Mormonism: A Quest for Understanding.

Boyce, Duane. “Were the Ammonites Pacifists?” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 18 no. 1 (2009).

One of the most moving accounts in the Book of Mormon is of the people of Ammon, their covenant to bury and never use again their weapons of war, their faith to sacrifice themselves instead of fighting back against their Lamanite brethren, and their sacrifice to send their children to war to aid the Nephites. Some interpret the stance that the Ammonites took against war to be pacifist. Some indications point toward this conclusion: their burying their weapons, covenanting never to fight again, allowing themselves to be slaughtered twice, and being motivated in these actions out of love for their Lamanite kin. However, when the text is read more carefully, it can easily be seen that further actions would not necessarily have reflected a pacifist view toward war: not objecting to the Nephite war in their defense, providing Nephite soldiers with food and supplies, and sending their own sons into battle would surely indicate that their personal opposition to war stemmed from the covenants they made during repentance.

Boylan, Robert. “On Not Understanding the Book of Mormon.” The FARMS Review 22, no. 1 (2010): Article 8.

Review of Ross Anderson. Understanding the Book of Mormon: A Quick Christian Guide to the Mormon Holy Book.

Bradford, M. Gerald. “Introduction.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 11 no. 2 (2002).

Introduction to the book.

Bradford, M. Gerald. “Recovering the Original Text of the Book of Mormon: An Interim Review.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 15 no. 1 (2006).

Bradford introduces reviews of Royal Skousen’s work on the critical text project.

Bradford, M. Gerald. “The Savior’s Final Hours.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 1 (2004): Article 18.

Review of Richard Neitzel Holzapfel and Thomas A. Wayment, eds. From the Last Supper through the Resurrection: The Savior’s Final Hours.

Bradford, M. Gerald. “The Study of Mormonism: A Growing Interest in Academia.” The FARMS Review 19, no. 1 (2007): Article 11.

Study of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has become a topic of increasing interest to universities and scholars around the country. Bradford addresses this new attention and discusses topics that scholars should research in more depth in order to achieve an accurate academic view of Mormonism.

Bradford, Mary Lythgoe. “A Reader's Library: Hugh Nibley: A Legend in His Own Time.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 12, no. 1 (2003): 108–110, 120.

This review enthusiastically endorses Boyd Petersen’s biography of his father-in-law, Hugh Nibley. Petersen intersperses narrative chapters with thematic ones in Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life.

Keywords: Boyd Jay Petersen;Hugh Nibley: A Consecrated Life;Hugh Nibley;Scholarship
Brady, Parrish and Shon Hopkin. “The Zoramites and Costly Apparel: Symbolism and Irony.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 22 no. 1 (2013).

The Zoramite narratives of Alma 31-35 and Alma 43-44 are richly symbolic accounts woven with many subtle details regarding the imporatnce of costly apparel and riches as an outward evidence of pride. This literary analysis focuses on how Mormon as editor structured the Zoramite narrative and used clothing as a metaphor to show the dangers of pride and the blessings afforded by humble adherence to God’s teachings and covenants. The Zoramite’s pride--as evidenced by their focus on costly apparel, gold, silver, and fine goods (Alma 31:24-25, 28)--competes with the foundational Book of Mormon teaching that the obedient will “ prosper in the land” (1 Nephi 4:14; Mosiah 1:7). The story deveops this tension between pride and true prosperity by employing the metaphor of clothing to set up several dramatic ironies.

Brewer, Stewart W. “The History of an Idea: The Scene on Stela 5 from Izapa, Mexico, as a Representation of Lehi’s Vision of the Tree of Life.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 1 (1992).

Stela 5, a large stone monument discovered in 1941 in Izapa, Mexico, was identified a decade later by M. Wells Jakeman as a bas-relief of Lehi’s vision of the tree of life. Scholars and laymen alike have both accepted and scoffed at this theory. This article provides a historical sketch of reactions to this claim and discusses some of the implications of accepting or rejecting Jakeman’s theory. Jakeman was the first to publish an LDS interpretation of Stela 5; later V. Garth Norman proposed a different interpretation based on a series of high-quality photographs of the monument. Suzanne Miles, a non-Mormon, postulated that Izapa Stela 5 presented a “fantastic visual myth,” and Gareth W. Lowe proposed that Stela 5 presents an original creation myth. Further criticisms and responses ensued over the years.

Briggs, Robert H. “Sally Denton’s American Massacre: Authentic Mormon Past versus the Danite Interpretation of History.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 1 (2004): Article 9.

Review of Sally Denton. American Massacre: The Tragedy at Mountain Meadows, September 1857.

Briggs, Robert H. “A Scholarly Look at the Disastrous Mountain Meadows Massacre.” The FARMS Review 20, no. 2 (2008): Article 10.

Review of Ronald W. Walker, Richard E. Turley Jr., and Glen M. Leonard. Massacre at Mountain Meadows: An American Tragedy.

Brown, Kent S. “New Light: Nahom and the Eastward Turn.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 12 no. 1 (2003).

The account of the journey of Lehi’s family through the wilderness mentions one local name, Nahom, where Ishmael was buried. The discovery of the tribal name NHM on three altars from the seventh and sixth centuries BC provides a likely location for that stopping point on their trip. This site is located at the bend of the incense trail that went in the opposite direction of Lehi’s group—westward to NHM and then turning northward.

Brown, Kent S. “The Sesquicentennial of Four European Translations of the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 11 no. 1 (2002).

Introduction to the following four articles on early translations of the Book of Mormon into French, German, Italian, and French.

Brown, Matthew B. “Girded about with a Lambskin.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6 no. 2 (1997).

The publication of the Book of Mormon brought forward the first of many comparisons between the restorational work of the Prophet Joseph Smith and his surrounding environment, including Freemasonry. One point of comparison has been the lambskin apparel mentioned in 3 Nephi 4:7. A possible connection exists between this item of apparel and ritual clothing that was worn in ancient Israel, Egypt, and Mesoamerica. I suggest a possible reason for the use of this item of clothing among the secret combinations in the Book of Mormon and discuss the lambskin apron used in Freemasonic ritual.

Brown, Matthew B. “Of Your Own Selves Shall Men Arise.” FARMS Review of Books 10, no. 1 (1998): Article 5.

Review of The Mysteries of Godliness: A History of Mormon Tmeple Worship (1994), by David John Buerger

Brown, S. Kent. “The Book of Mormon at the Bar of DNA Evidence.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 12 no. 1 (2003).

Editor’s introduction to a four-part series on the relationship of DNA studies to Book of Mormon origins.

Brown, S. Kent. “A Case for Lehi’s Bondage in Arabia.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6 no. 2 (1997).

The lengthy sojourn of Lehi’s family in the Arabian desert invites the almost inevitable question whether circumstances forced family members to live in the service of tribesmen either for protection or for food. In my view, enough clues exist in the Book of Mormon—they have to be assembled—to bring one to conclude that the family lived for a time in a servile condition, a situation that apparently entailed suffering and conflict.

Brown, S. Kent. “Donald W. Parry and Dana M. Pike, eds., LDS Perspectives on the dead Sea Scrolls.” FARMS Review of Books 10, no. 2 (1998): Article 10.

Review of LDS Perspectives on the Dead Sea Scrolls (1997), edited by Donald W. Parry and Dana M. Pike

Brown, S. Kent. “The Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 11 no. 1 (2002).

Summary of current issue.

Brown, S. Kent. “The Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 12 no. 1 (2003).

Introduction to the current issue.

Brown, S. Kent. “The Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 12 no. 2 (2003).

Introduction to the current issue.

Brown, S. Kent. “The Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 13 no. 1 (2004).

Introduction to the current issue.

Brown, S. Kent. “The Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 14 no. 1 (2005).
Brown, S. Kent. “The Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 14 no. 2 (2005).

Summary of current issue.

Brown, S. Kent. “The Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 15 no. 1 (2006).

Summary of current issue.

Brown, S. Kent. “The Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 16 no. 1 (2007).
Brown, S. Kent. “The Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 16 no. 2 (2007).

Summary of current issue.

Brown, S. Kent. “The Hunt for the Valley of Lemuel.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 16 no. 1 (2007).

A canyon in northwestern Arabia, Wadi Tayyib al-Ism, appears to be a strong candidate for the Valley of Lemuel in the Book of Mormon. Although its rare year-round stream seems to confirm this site as the valley, other locations must be considered. Brown gives arguments both in favor of and against three other propositions, all of which are within a few dozen miles of Wadi Tayyib al-Ism. The aspects of the river and the Red Sea, the drainage areas of wadis, and the character of the valley are all evaluated. Despite his one serious objection to Wadi Tayyib al-Ism—the difficulty Lehi’s family would have experienced in reaching the site from the north end of the Gulf of Aqaba—Brown argues that it is the most viable candidate for the Valley of Lemuel.

Brown, S. Kent. “The Prophetic Laments of Samuel the Lamanite.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 1 no. 1 (1992).

The wide-ranging sermon of Samuel the Lamanite, spoken from the top of the city wall of Zarahemla, exhibits poetic features in a censuring passage—features that bear similarities to laments found in the Bible, most notably in the Psalms. Like the laments in the Bible, those in Samuel’s speech show contacts with worship. In distinction to the biblical laments, but like the Thanksgiving Hymns of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the poetic pieces in Samuel’s sermon reveal a set of prophecies that find fulfillment in later periods, including the days of Mormon, the compiler and editor of the Book of Mormon.

Brown, S. Kent. “Refining the Spotlight on Lehi and Sariah.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 15 no. 2 (2006).

Royal Skousen’s endeavor to recover the original text of the Book of Mormon is more complicated than it seems because it involves more than simply reproducing the original manuscript. Rather, what Skousen means by “original text” is the very language that appeared on the Urim and Thummim. Every subsequent step, such as Joseph’s reading, his scribes’ understanding and transcribing of that utterance, and Oliver Cowdery’s copying of the manuscript for the printer, exposed the text to the possibility of human subjectivity and error. This paper explains the nature and scope of Skousen’s monumental undertaking and presents some of the methods and reasoning he employs to resolve disputed textual variants in search the Book of Mormon’s original text.

Bruening, Ari D. and David L. Paulsen. “The Development of the Mormon Understanding of God: Early Mormon Modalism and Other Myths.” FARMS Review of Books 13, no. 2 (2001): Article 13.

Review of Mormonism and the Nature of God: A Theological Revolution, 1830-1915 (2000), by Kurt Widmer

Brugger, Don L. “Toward the Ultimate Book of Mormon Time Line.” The FARMS Review 20, no. 1 (2008): Article 1.

Review of Christopher Kimball Bigelow. The Timechart History of Mormonism: FromPremortality to the Present.

Bunker, Robert L. “The Design of the Liahona and the Purpose of the Second Spindle.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 3 no. 2 (1994).

The Liahona was given by the Lord as a communicationsdevice for Lehi to determine the appropriate direction of travel. This device contained two pointers, only one of which was necessary to provide directional information. But the Liahona was more than just a simple compass in function, for it additionally required faith for correct operation. Since a single pointer always "points" in some direction, the additional pointer was necessary to indicate whether or not the first pointer could be relied upon. This proposed purpose for the second pointer conforms to a well-established engineering principle used in modern fault-tolerant computer systems called "voting," in which two identical process states are compared and declared correct if they are the same, and incorrect if they are different. Hence the second pointer, when coincident with the first, would indicate proper operation, and when orthogonal, would indicate nonoperation.

Bush, Charles D. “Michael R. Todd, Ted E. Van Horn, and Mark Van Horn. Book of Mormon Stories CD-ROM.” FARMS Review of Books 9, no. 1 (1997): Article 17.

Review of Book of Mormon Stories (CD-ROM, 1995), by Michael R. todd, Ted E. Van Horn, and Mark Van Horn

Bushman, Richard L. “Just the Facts Please.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 6, no. 2 (1994): Article 9.

Review of Inventing Mormonism: Tradition and the Historical Record (1994), by H. Michael Marquardt and Wesley P. Walters.

Bushman, Richard Lyman. “Hugh Nibley and Joseph Smith.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture 19, no. 1, (2010): 4–13.

Reprinted in Hugh Nibley Observed.

Just as attorneys representing the church wouldn’t bear their testimonies in a courtroom, Hugh Nibley defended Joseph Smith through facts and scholarly dialogue, not testimony bearing. Although Nibley did, at times, discuss the Prophet specifically, his defense of Joseph came primarily through academic vindication of the Book of Mormon. When others made scholarly attacks against Joseph’s character, Nibley would move the debate to a discussion of the historicity of the book on its own terms. When Nibley did directly discuss the Prophet, he portrayed him as a humble, loving servant of God.

Keywords: Book of Mormon;apologetics;criticizing the Brethren;testimony;Early Church History;Historicity;Joseph Smith
Buskirk, Allen R. “Science, Pseudoscience, and Religious Belief.” The FARMS Review 17, no. 1 (2005): Article 12.

Review of Carl Sagan. The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark.

Butler, John M. “Addressing Questions Surrounding the Book of Mormon and DNA Research.” The FARMS Review 18, no. 1 (2006): Article 7.

Butler discusses the premises of the DNA argument between supporters and critics of the Book of Mormon.

Butler, John M. “A Few Thoughts From a Believing DNA Scientist.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 12 no. 1 (2003).

The Book of Mormon does not give sufficient information about the background of Ishmael’s wife, the wives of Ishmael’s sons, and Nephi’s sisters to test the mitochondrial DNA of the group. Other problems for critics’ assertions include the uncertainty of Lehi’s possession of an Abrahamic Y chromosome and the complete disregard for the entire Jaredite population (remnants of which may have survived their final battle). Confident scientific conclusions are difficult to attain and cannot replace a spiritual witness of the truthfulness of the Book of Mormon.

C

Calabro, David. ““Stretch Forth Thy Hand and Prophesy“: Hand Gestures in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 21 no. 1 (2012).

Often overlooked in scriptural text, hand and arm gestures are often used to convey meanings that complement the verbal lessons being taught. This article discusses the meaning and significance of four specific gestures referred to in the Book of Mormon: stretching forth one’s hand(s), stretching forth the hand to exert divine power, extending the arm(s) in mercy, and clapping the hands to express joys. Beyond the fascinating meanings of these gestures in the Book of Mormon are the correlations that can be seen in the biblical text and in other Near Eastern cultures. Also insightful, specifically in reference to Moses’s hand movements at the Red Sea, is the way in which the Bible, the Book of Mormon, and other extracanonical writings build on each other to give a fuller interpretive picture.

Campbell, Les. “E. L. Peay, The Lands of Zarahemla.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 6, no. 2 (1994): Article 11.

Review of The Lands of Zarahemla (1993), by E. L. Peay.

Cannon, Donald Q. “In the Press: Early Newspaper Reports on the Initial Publication of the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 16 no. 2 (2007).

Cannon’s examination of news articles and stories concerning the publication of the Book of Mormon helps provide a greater understanding of its initial reception. Most news coverage first appeared in Palmyra and the surrounding areas, but articles on the Book of Mormon appeared as far west as Missouri and Arkansas and from Maine to Georgia. Even with this seemingly wide range of coverage, the overall quantity of news articles on the topic reveals how few people knew about the book and the early LDS Church as a whole. Although the majority of the news articles concerning the Book of Mormon were negative, some assumed a neutral stance and a relatively small number were positive about the book and its publication.

Carlton, JoAnn and John W. Welch. “Possible Linguistic Roots of Certain Book of Mormon Proper Names.” Provo, UT: FARMS, 1991. Preliminary Report.
Carr, Stephen L. “Birds Along Lehi’s Trail.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 15 no. 2 (2006).

Royal Skousen’s work on his Book of Mormon critical text project demonstrates that he is an able textual critic who employs sound judgment and proven methods to uncover the original text of the Book of Mormon. In many cases, these decisions seem counterintuitive to untrained readers, but Skousen correctly applies the principle that a more awkward reading is most likely original. He also shows his ability to make conjectural emendations for which no direct textual evidence is available. In every case, Skousen clearly lays out his reasoning so that readers who disagree with his inferences can examine the evidence for themselves to reach their own conclusions. This paper goes on to speculate that Skousen’s work may in time bring the LDS and RLDS editions of the Book of Mormon closer together textually. In the end, the critical text project is a superb work of scholarship on par with the standard works of biblical textual criticism.

Carter, K. Codell and Christopher B. Isaac. “One Response to a Singularly Worthless Genre.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 6, no. 2 (1994): Article 7.

Review of Refuting the Critics: Evidences of the Book of Mormon's Authenticity (1993), by Michael T. Griffiths

Chadwick, Bruce A. “Rodney Stark, The Rise of Christianity: A Sociologist Reconsiders History.” FARMS Review of Books 10, no. 2 (1998): Article 12.

Review of The Rise of Christianity: A Sociologist Reconsiders History (1996), by Rodney Stark

Chadwick, Jeffrey R. “An Archaeologist’s View.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 15 no. 2 (2006).

Royal Skousen’s most significant contribution to Book of Mormon scholarship, this paper states, is in openly and systematically detailing the thousands of variants that occur across two manuscripts and twenty editions and showing that these variations do not affect the message or validity of the book as a witness of Jesus Christ. Skousen’s work also offers new insights into the process of translating and publishing the Book of Mormon. Though the work of translation appears to have involved a number of different methods, we can nevertheless be sure that the Book of Mormon was translated by the “gift and power of God.”

Chadwick, Jeffrey R. “Has the Seal of Mulek Been Found?” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 12 no. 2 (2003).

A small stamp seal bearing the inscription belonging to Malkiyahu, son of the king, arguably belonged to Mulek, son of Zedekiah, who accompanied one of the Israelite groups that settled in the New World. Jeremiah 38:6 mentions Malchiah the son of Hammelech, which could also be a reference to this same Mulek. Discussion centers on similar seals, the meaning of Ben Hamelek, the possible age of Malkiyahu, and Book of Mormon claims about Mulek. This seal could conceivably have been left behind in Jerusalem and found centuries later, thus representing an archaeological artifact of a Book of Mormon personality.

Chadwick, Jeffrey R. “Lehi in the Samaria Papyri and on an Ostracon from the Shore of the Red Sea.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 19 no. 1 (2010).

Until the discovery of Ostracon 2071, dating from the fifth century BC, in the 1930s on the shores of the Red Sea, the name Lehi (l?y in the discovered text) had been unattested in any extant document outside of the Book of Mormon. However, Nelson Gluek, along with many other scholars, including Hugh Nibley, vocalized l?y as “La?ai,” which pronunciation would have south Semitic roots. Chadwick argues, instead, that a Hebrew context for the ostracon would be more plausible and that therefore the more likely pronunciation would be “l??y.” He also argues for a Hebrew origin of the compound name ?bl?y, found in the fourth-century BC Samaria Papyri. Both of these names, given their strong Hebrew context, seem to confirm that Lehi was a name in use in ancient Israel and its surrounding areas.

Chadwick, Jeffrey R. “The Names Lehi and Sariah—Language and Meaning.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 9 no. 1 (2000).

Unlike the Old and New Testaments, where a variety of Hebrew and Greek texts exist to aid us, for the Book of Mormon we have only the King James English translation produced by Joseph Smith. The languages of the Book of Mormon were hardly the same throughout the original composition. Chadwick continues the onomastic discussion of the names Lehi and Sariah by suggesting that the Book of Mormon name Lehi matches the spelling in the King James Bible in the place-name Ramath-lehi; therefore the two must necessarily represent the same Hebrew term. He agrees with one of Hoskisson’s meanings for Lehi’s name— “jaw”— and indicates this may be a nickname rather than a proper name. Sariah is attested as a female name in a Near Eastern document. Although not found as a female name in the Bible, it is well documented as a male name in ancient Israel. In this light, the name means “Jehovah is Prince,” meaning Jehovah is the son of a king.

Chadwick, Jeffrey R. “Out of the Dust: All That Glitters Is Not . . . Steel.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 15 no. 1 (2006).

A previous report characterized a metal blade discovered at the site of biblical Ekron in Israel as a steel short sword dating from the late seventh century BC, shortly before Lehi left Jerusalem, thus corroborating the much-criticized account of Laban’s steel sword in the Book of Mormon. Unfortunately, these assertions are incorrect. Jeffrey R. Chadwick, who is personally acquainted with the excavators who unearthed the blade, explains here that the blade is not a short sword but probably a ceremonial knife. Additionally, the knife is likely from the eleventh century BC and cannot properly be described as steel. Though this artifact does not support the Book of Mormon account of seventh-century steel swords, much better archaeological parallels do exist. Chadwick mentions a meter-long steel sword discovered in Jericho that dates to around 600 BC. This genuinely steel sword from the proper time period makes Nephi’s description of Laban’s sword entirely plausible.

Chadwick, Jeffrey R. “Sariah in the Elephantine Papyri.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2 no. 2 (1993).

The Book of Mormon name Sariah does not appear as a female name in the Bible but has now been identified in a reconstructed form in an Aramaic papyrus. A Jewish woman living at Elephantine in Upper Egypt during the fifth century BC was identified as Sariah daughter of Hoshea.

Chadwick, Jeffrey R. “Three Books on Jewish and Mormon Themes.” The FARMS Review 15, no. 1 (2003): Article 19.

Review of Raphael Jospe, Truman G. Madsen, and Seth Ward, eds. Covenant and Chosenness in Judaism and Mormonism. Review of Frank J. Johnson and Rabbi William J. Leffler. Jews and Mormons: Two Houses of Israel. Review of Harris Lenowitz. The Jewish Messiahs: From the Galilee to Crown Heights.

Chadwick, Jeffrey R. “The Wrong Place for Lehi's Trail and the Valley of Lemuel.” The FARMS Review 17, no. 2 (2005): Article 7.

Review of George Potter and Richard Wellington. Lehi in the Wilderness.

Childs, Larry G. “Present Participle Adjuncts in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6 no. 1 (1997).

Participle adjuncts in the Book of Mormon are compared with those in the other writings of Joseph Smith and with English in general. Participle adjuncts include present participle phrases, e.g., “having gained the victory over death” (Mosiah 15:8); present participle clauses, e.g., “he having four sons” (Ether 6:20), and a double-subject adjunct construction, known as the coreferential subject construction, where both subjects refer to the same thing, as in “Alma, being the chief judge . . . of the people of Nephi, therefore he went up with the people” (Alma 2:16). The Book of Mormon is unique in the occurrences of extremely long compound adjunct phrases and coreferential subject constructions, indicating that Joseph Smith used a very literal translation style for the Book of Mormon.

Christensen, Kevin. “Dan Vogel, Origins and the Book of Mormon.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): Article 28.

Review of Origins and the Book of Mormon (1986), by Dan Vogel.

Christensen, Kevin. “The Deuteronomist De-Christianizing of the Old Testament.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 2 (2004): Article 5.

Review of Melodie Moench Charles. “The Mormon Christianizing of the Old Testament.” In The Word of God: Essays on Mormon Scripture

Christensen, Kevin. “Hindsight on a Book of Mormon Historicity Critique.” The FARMS Review 22, no. 2 (2010): Article 8.

Review of William D. Russell. “A Further Inquiriy into the Historicity of the Book of Mormon.” Sunstone, September-October 1982, 20-27.

Christensen, Kevin. ““Nigh unto Death”: NDE Research and the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2 no. 1 (1993).

This article suggests that contemporary near-death research casts light on several episodes in the Book of Mormon. Alma’s conversion while “nigh unto death” fits a common pattern of experience. Modern researchers have noticed distinctive aftereffects among those who have experienced a near-death experience (NDE). In the Book of Mormon, both Alma and the resurrected Christ demonstrate these aftereffects. Lehi’s dream invites comparison with the otherworld journey literature of many nations. Nephi’s interpretation of Lehi’s dream casts light on the tension between the literal and the symbolic elements of visionary experience. Finally, just as accurate out-of-body observations made by NDErs argued for the reality of their experiences, so the testable aspects of the Book of Mormon give Joseph Smith a significance apart from others who may have experienced similar visions.

Christensen, Kevin. “Paradigms Crossed.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 7, no. 2 (1995): Article 9.

Review of New Approaches to the Book of Mormon: Explorations in Critical Methodology (1993), edited by Brent Lee Metcalfe.

Christensen, Kevin. “A Response to David Wright on Historical Criticism.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 3 no. 1 (1994).

In an article criticizing the historicity of the Book of Mormon, David Wright described critical scholarship and traditionalist modes as contrasting paradigms used to approach the scriptures. This article explores the nature of paradigm debate in general, in that context points out weaknesses in Wright’s critical approach, and discerns crucial flaws in his definition of believing paradigms.

Christensen, Kevin. “A Response to Paul Owen's Comments on Margaret Barker.” FARMS Review of Books 14, no. 1 (2002): Article 12.

Review of “Monotheism, Mormonism, and the New Testament Witness” (2002), by Paul Owen

Christensen, Kevin. “Truth and Method: Reflections on Dan Vogel’s Approach to the Book of Mormon.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 1 (2004): Article 15.

Kevin Christensen responds to Dan Vogel’s views against the authenticity of the Book of Mormon. Vogel claims that the Book of Mormon cannot be a translated text because there were numerous influences surrounding Joseph Smith that could have motivated him to write the book on his own. Christensen and Vogel have responded to each other’s claims previously; this article is a continuation of that debate.

Christenson, Allen J. “Linguistic Puzzles Still Unresolved.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 2 (2004): Article 7.

Review of Robert A. Pate. Mapping the Book of Mormon: A Comprehensive Geography of Nephite America.

Christenson, Allen J. “Maya Harvest Festivals and the Book of Mormon: Annual FARMS Lecture.” In Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3 (1991): Article 0.

Christenson, in the annual FARMS lecture deliverd on 27 February 1991, examined the Maya New Year's harvest festival, perhaps the most important public festival of the year. The festival coincided with the main corn harvest in mid-November and served as the New Year's Day of the solar calendar, when kingship was renewed. Christenson gave particular attention to the symbolic treatments of the evil god Mam; the ritual descent of the king, as representative of the god of life and resurrection, into the underworld; the king's ritual conflict with and defeat of the lords of the underworld (and of death); and the king's triumphat return or resurrection. The Maya used the image of the tree of life in connection with the atonement and resurrection.

Christenson, Allen J. “The Sacred Tree of the Ancient Maya.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6 no. 1 (1997).

Sacred trees, representing the power of life to grow from the underworld realm of the dead, are a common motif in the art and literature of the ancient Maya of Mesoamerica. Such trees are similar in concept to the tree of life described in the Book of Mormon, as well as to the mythic traditions of many other contemporary world cultures. Hieroglyphic inscriptions and sixteenth-century highland Maya texts describe a great world tree that was erected at the dawn of the present age to stand as the axis point of the cosmos. In its fruit-laden form, it personified the god of creation who fathered the progenitors of the Maya royal dynasty.

Clark, E. Douglas. “A Powerful New Resource for Studying the Book of Abraham.” The FARMS Review 15, no. 1 (2003): Article 10.

Review of John A. Tvedtnes, Brian M. Hauglid, and John Gee, comps. and eds. Traditions about the Early Life of Abraham.

Clark, John. “The Final Battle for Cumorah.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 6, no. 2 (1994): Article 6.

Review of Christ in North America (1993), by Delbert W. Curtis. Clark examines the scholarship and logic involved in assuming a one-Cumorah theory for Book of Mormon geography.

Clark, John E. “Archaeology and Cumorah Questions.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 13 no. 1 (2004).

The archaeology of New York—and specifically the Hill Cumorah—is persuasive evidence that Book of Mormon peoples did not live in that region. By implication, the Cumorah of the golden plates is not the Cumorah of the final battles—Mormon’s hill and Moroni’s hill are not one and the same. These conclusions follow from a few basic points and assumptions that the author explores in this article.

Clark, John E. “Archaeology, Relics, and Book of Mormon Belief.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 14 no. 2 (2005).

Archaeology has much to offer as a scientific means of gathering independent evidence of the Book of Mormon’s authenticity. But one must look in the right place. A cautionary tale is the failed Cluff expedition of 1900, which, assuming a “hemispheric model” of Book of Mormon geography, traveled from Provo as far as Colombia looking for the city Zarahemla. Yet in 1842 the Times and Seasons (under Joseph Smith’s editorship) had printed excerpts from a popular book on Mesoamerican archaeology that demonstrated a surprisingly high level of civilization, implying that Nephite lands did not extend into South America, thus supporting the theory of a ”limited” geographic model. Both sides believe that archaeology is on their side. Book of Mormon critics also claim that archaeology is on their side, but decades of archaeological investigation in Mesoamerica and in the Old World has shown a pattern of increasing convergence that favors Book of Mormon authenticity. Evidences discussed include, among others, metal records in stone boxes, ancient writing, warfare, the tree of life and other metaphors, Old and New World geography, and cycles of civilization. In a sidebar article, the findings of an amateur archaeologist challenge a popular assumption that the hill was the scene of the final battles depicted in the Book of Mormon.

Clark, John E. “Evaluating the Case for a Limited Great Lakes Setting.” FARMS Review of Books 14, no. 1 (2002): Article 4.

Review of Return to Cumorah: Piecing Together the Puzzle Where the Nephites Lived (1998), by Duane R. Aston; The Land of Lehi: Further Evidence for the Book of Mormon (1999), by Paul Hedengren: and The Lost Lands of the Book of Mormon (2000), by Phyllis Carol Olive

Clark, John E. “A Key for Evaluating Nephite Geographies.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 1 (1989): Article 7.

Review of Deciphering the Geography of the Book of Mormon (1988), by F. Richard Hauck.

The first question in dealing with Book of Mormon geography should be whether the geography fits the facts of the Book of Mormon. Clark reconstructs an elemental geography and examines internal clues for distances between locations and the surrounding terrain. To evaluate geographies, Clark summarizes ten simple points having to do with the narrow neck of land, the coastlines, the wildernesses, the valleys, the rivers, a lake, and the relative locations of Zarahemla, Bountiful, Nephi, and Cumorah. Using these criteria, he evaluates the Sorenson and Hauck proposed geographies.

Clark, John E. “A New Artistic Rendering of Izapa Stela 5: A Step toward Improved Interpretation.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 1 (1992).

Aided by creative techniques, Ajáx Moreno carefully prepared more accurate, detailed renderings of the Izapa monuments, including Stela 5, with its complex scenes of gods and other supernatural creatures, royalty, animals invested with mythic and value symbolism, and mortals. The author raises relevant questions about reconciling Jakeman’s view with the new drawing: Are there Old World connections? Can Izapa be viewed as a Book of Mormon city? Did the Nephites know of Lehi’s dream? Are there name glyphs on the stela? The scene, if it does not depict Lehi’s dream, fits clearly in Mesoamerican art in theme, style, technical execution, and meaning. The basic theme of Stela 5 may be the king as intercessor with the gods on behalf of his people.

Clark, John E. “Revisiting “A Key for Evaluating Book of Mormon Geographies”.” Mormon Studies Review 23, no. 1 (2011): Article 4.

The author updates his 1989 key for judging the merits of theories that attempt to locate Book of Mormon events in the real world. His “internal” geography of the book is based exclusively on what the book itself says about locations, distances, and directions. Six components (“transects”) of this geography are treated in detail, and ten crucial tests of geographical relatedness are proposed.

Clark, John E. “Searching for Book of Mormon Lands in Middle America.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 2 (2004): Article 3.

Review of Joseph L. Allen. Sacred Sites: Searching for Book of Mormon Lands and Review of James Warr. A New Model for Book of Mormon Geography.

Clark, John E. “Two Points of Book of Mormon Geography: A Review.” FARMS Review of Books 8, no. 2 (1996): Article 3.

Review of The Land of Lehi (1995), by Paul Hedengren

Clark, John L. “Painting Out the Messiah: The Theologies of Dissidents.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 11 no. 1 (2002).

Despite the establishment of Christ’s church in the New World by the Book of Mormon prophet Nephi, many dissenters during its thousand-year history attempted to thwart the church and preach alternative theologies. This article first discusses the doctrine that Nephi taught to his people concerning Jesus Christ. Historical context then provides further understanding of the society in which Nephi and his descendants lived. Having come from Jerusalem in the Old World, the Nephites were still accustomed to the law of Moses, which certainly would have influenced their view of a Messiah. This, along with the political circumstances of the Nephite people, facilitated the dissension of many. The experiences of the Anti-Christ Sherem, the priests of Noah, and the Zarahemla dissidents demonstrate these points. Lastly, those who altered Nephi’s teachings appeared to do so for five specific reasons, which are discussed in this article, thus showing how the dissenters erased the doctrine of a Redeemer from their theologies.

Clark, Robert E. “Notes on Korihor and Language.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2 no. 1 (1993).

Korihor makes use of language to cast doubt in the minds of his listeners and to tear down the power of God. Language is used for both good and ill.

Clark, Robert E. “The Type at the Border: An Inquiry into Book of Mormon Typology.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2 no. 2 (1993).

A certain combination of temperament and upbringing can lead to a sense of alienation from the scriptures’ meaning. This paper considers the role that types might play in overcoming that alienation as they mediate between scriptural understanding and human experience, permitting deeper insight into both. The difficulties and possibilities inherent in such an approach shed light on a typological analysis of the figures of Abinadi and the brother of Jared.

Compton, Tod. “John W. Welch, The Sermon at the Temple and the Sermon on the Mount.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3 (1991): Article 23.

Review of The Sermon at the Temple and the Sermon on the Mount (1990), by John W. Welch.

Compton, Todd M. “Hugh Nibley, Lehi in the Desert, The World of the Jaredites, There Were Jaredites; An Approach to the Book of Mormon; and Since Cumorah.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 1 (1989): 114-118.

Since 1989, the Review of Books on the Book of Mormon has published review essays to help serious readers make informed choices and judgments about books and other publications on topics related to the Latter-day Saint religious tradition. It has also published substantial freestanding essays that made further contributions to the field of Mormon studies. In 1996, the journal changed its name to the FARMS Review with Volume 8, No 1. In 2011, the journal was renamed Mormon Studies Review.

A review of Lehi in the Desert, The World of the Jaredites, There Were Jaredites; An Approach to the Book of Mormon; and Since Cumorah, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley vols. 5, 6, and 7, respectively.

Keywords: Ancient Near East;Arabia;Bedouin;Cumorah;Desert;Hill Cumorah;Jaredite;Lehi; Lehi in the Desert; Todd M. Compton;review;Ancient Near East;Arabia;Bedouin;Cumorah;Desert;Hill Cumorah;Jaredite;Lehi (Prophet)
Compton, Todd M. “The Spirituality of the Outcast in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2 no. 1 (1993).

In the Book of Mormon, despised outcasts, such as the Lamanites or the poor, often have a special aptitude for spirituality, and the richer, civilized, and more overtly religious Nephites are often declining in righteousness. This phenomenon, with some characteristic specific themes, such as being excluded from a religious edifice, is found in ancient and contemporary cultures and religions. This theme points up the complexity of the Book of Mormon, which is not simple cowboys-and-Indians melodrama.

Conkling, J. Christopher. “Alma’s Enemies: The Case of the Lamanites, Amlicites, and Mysterious Amalekites.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 14 no. 1 (2005).

In Alma 21 a new group of troublemakers is introduced—the Amalekites—without explanation or introduction. This article offers arguments that this is the same group called Amlicites elsewhere and that the confusion is caused by Oliver Cowdery’s inconsistency in spelling. If this theory is accurate, then Alma structured his narrative record more tightly and carefully than previously realized. The concept also challenges the simplicity of the good Nephite/bad Lamanite rubric so often used to describe the players in the book of Mormon.

Cook, Roger D. “How Deep the Platonism? A Review of Owen and Mosser's Appendix: Hellenism, Greek Philosophy, and the Creedal “Straightjacket” of Christian Orthodoxy.” FARMS Review of Books 11, no. 2 (1999): Article 8.

Cook addresses the following issues raised by Owen and Mosser: Did Greek philosophy cause an apostasy in the early Christian church? How deeply Hellenized were the early Jewish converts of Christianity? Philosphy and the Hellenization of Christianity, and Early Judaic and Christian beliefs concerning God and theosis.

Cooper, Glen M. “Appendix, On Aping Aristotle: Modern-day Simplicios.” The FARMS Review 15, no. 2 (2003): Article 3.

Cooper addresses the claim that Thomas Murphy’s DNA research is a “Galileo event.” He provides information on Galileo’s life to show that Galileo was not against religion and that the Catholic Church was not against science. Cooper then parallels that information with the Murphy situation. Like Galileo, Murphy has not taken a stance against religion, only against a particular religious text

Cooper, Glen M. “Book of Mormon Bibliography (1988).” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 1, no. 1 (1989): Article 19.

Bibliography of Publications on the Book of Mormon in 1988.

Cooper, Glen M. “Historical Paradigms in Conflict: The Nauvoo Period Revisited.” FARMS Review of Books 14, no. 1 (2002): Article 16.

Review of Cultures in Conflict: A Documentary History of the Mormon War in Illinois (1995), edited by John E. Hallwas and Roger D. Launius

Coutts, Alison V. P. “Disarray Revisited.” The FARMS Review 19, no. 1 (2007): Article 18.

Review of Noel B. Reynolds, ed. Early Christians in Disarray: Contemporary LDS Perspectives on the Christian Apostasy. and Review of Scott R. Petersen. Where Have All the Prophets Gone?

Coutts, Alison V. P. “Earnestly Seeking.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 7, no. 2 (1995): Article 11.

Review of Recent Book of Mormon Developments: Articles from the Zarahemla Record, vol. 2 (1992), edited by Raymond C. Treat.

Cowan, Richard O. “Latter-day Saint Temples as Symbols.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 21 no. 1 (2012).

Much of what is done in Latter-day Saint temples is symbolic. Temple symbolism, however, extends well beyond the ordinances performed within the temples. From the Kirtland Temple’s pulpits representing the different orders of the priesthood to the stones on the Salt Lake Temple representing the universe and one’s relationship to God, exterior temple symbolism complements the principles learned within. The architecture within temples also provides insights into the ordinances. In many temples, murals depicting the different kingdoms of glory and stairs leading to higher areas remind participants of their ascent to God. This article chronicles, in detail, the meanings and development of these and other symbols incorporated into the architecture of modern-day temples.

Cracroft, Richard H.Out of Darkness into Light: A Novel Approach.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 4 (1992): Article 62.

Review of Out of Darkness (1991), by Keith C. Terry (with Maurice R. Tanner).

Cracroft, Richard H. “A General Reader’s Library of Book of Mormon StudiesThe (Literary) Coming Forth of the Book of Mormon: Three Recent Milestones.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 7 no. 1 (1998).

Cracroft reviews the following books that can deepen one’s understanding of the Book of Mormon: Richard Dilworth Rust’s Feasting on the Word: The Literary Testimony of the Book of Mormon; Marilyn Arnold’s Sweet Is the Word: Reflections on the Book of Mormon: Its Narrative, Teachings and People; and Elder Jeffrey R. Holland’s Christ and the New Covenant: The Messianic Message of the Book of Mormon.

Cracroft, Richard H. “Had for Good and Evil: 19th-Century Literary Treatments of the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 12 no. 2 (2003).

Moroni prophesied on 21 September 1823 that Joseph’s name, and by implication the book he would eventually translate and publish, should be had for good and evil among all nations, kindreds, and tongues. Many current criticisms of the Book of Mormon trace their roots to the antagonistic critiques by 19th-century authors, beginning with Abner Cole, Alexander Campbell, and E. D. Howe. Campbell in particular was responsible for introducing the environmental theory: that Joseph Smith introduced 19th-century elements into his story. Travelers to Salt Lake City published their exposés, which were mostly critical of the Latter-day Saints and their book of sacred scripture. Mark Twain’s dismissive treatment of the book forged lasting popular misconceptions of the book. Fiction writers of the 19th century contributed to suspicion of and ignorance about Mormonism and the Book of Mormon. In more recent times, Fawn M. Brodie, Thomas O’Dea, and Robert V. Remini perpetuated environmental claims about the book. Recent Latter-day Saint scholars— Hugh Nibley, Richard Bushman, and Terryl Givens— represent those who speak good of the book and try to correct misperceptions about it.

Cracroft, Richard H. ““Polishing God's Altars” Fictionally Wresting the Book of Mormon.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 2 (1990): Article 16.

Review of the Nephite Chronicles (1984-1989), by Robert H. Moss.

Cracroft, Richard H. “Terryl L. Givens. The Viper on the Hearth: Mormons, Myths, and the Construction of Heresy.” FARMS Review of Books 9, no. 2 (1997): Article 10.

Review of The Viper on the Hearth: Mormons, Myths, and the Construction of Heresy (1997), by Terryl L. Givens.

Cracroft, Richard H. “Through a Glass, Brightly: Happenings in Book of Mormon Fiction.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 6, no. 2 (1994): Article 8.

Review of Daniel and Nephi (1993), by Chris Heimerdinger: and Samuel: Moroni's Young Warrior (1993), by Clair Poulson.

Cranney, Carl J. “The Deliberate Use of Hebrew Parallelisms in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 23 no. 1 (2014).
Crockett, Robert D. “The Denton Debacle.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 1 (2004): Article 10.

Review of Sally Denton. American Massacre: The Tragedy at Mountain Meadows, September 1857.

Crockett, Robert D. “A Trial Lawyer Reviews Will Bagley’s Blood of the Prophets.” The FARMS Review 15, no. 2 (2003): Article 12.

Review of Will Bagley. Blood of the Prophets: Brigham Young and the Massacre at Mountain Meadows.

Crowe, Chris. “Chris Heimerdinger, Tennis Shoes and the Feathered Serpent.” FARMS Review of Books 8, no. 1 (1996): Article 17.

Review of Tennis Shoes and the Feathered Serpent (1995), by Chris Heimerdinger

Crowell, Angela M. and John A. Tvedtnes. “The Nephite and Jewish Practice of Blessing God after Eating One’s Fill.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 6 no. 2 (1997).

A Jewish custom of blessing God after eating one’s fill at a meal is reflected in passing in Amulek’s household and when the resurrected Christ blesses the sacrament for the Nephites and thereafter instructs them to pray. They “gave glory to Jesus” on this occasion.

Cumming, David Butler. “Three Days and Three Nights: Reassessing Jesus’s Entombment.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 16 no. 1 (2007).

The Bible does not explicitly state on which day of the week the Savior was crucified, and the passages describing the length of time he spent in the tomb can be interpreted in multiple ways. Depending on how days were measured and on what Sabbath the day of preparation preceded—whether the weekly Sabbath or the Passover Sabbath—the crucifixion could plausibly have occurred on Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday. The Bible and history have not been able to determine on which day of the week the crucifixion occurred, but the Book of Mormon gives additional information to establish the day. Based on a comparison of the passages in the two texts and an examination of time differences between the two hemispheres, Thursday appears to be the most plausible solution.

Curci, Jonathan. “Liahona: “The Direction of the Lord”: An Etymological Explanation.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 16 no. 2 (2007).

The etymological meaning of the name Liahona has been touched on before, but Curci seeks to deliver a more plausible etymology than has previously been given. By transliterating the word back into the Hebraic idioms of the time of Lehi and evaluating the grammatical elements to form the name, he has settled on the meaning of “ direction of the Lord.” The name is broken into three parts, and Curci argues that each part is Hebraic in origin, including the meaning and interpretation of each part. The etymological evidence regarding the name Liahona strengthens the claim that the book was written by a group of ancient Hebrews and not Joseph Smith.

D

Dadson, Andrew E. “With Real Intent: A Priceless Gem.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 12 no. 1 (2003).

Dadson shares his experience of gaining a testimony of the Book of Mormon while a young teenager at boarding school in Ghana. He was blessed through clean living, studying the Book of Mormon, and paying his tithing.

David L. Paulsen, Kendel J. Christensen et al. “Redeeming the Dead: Tender Mercies, Turning of Hearts, and Restoration of Authority.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 20 no. 1 (2011).

Beginning with Paul’s reference to baptism for the dead and the early Christian practice thereof, many theologians—from Augustine and Cyril of Alexandria to Thomas Aquinas, Joseph Smith, and some of his contemporaries—have discussed the fate of the unevangelized dead. These authors have provided many ideas to solve this soteriological problem of evil; however, until the restoration, none could balance the three truths that God is all loving, one must accept Jesus Christ to be saved, and many have died without knowing about Christ. This article chronicles the thoughts of these and other theologians as well as the development, through revelation, of Joseph Smith’s own thinking on postmortem evangelization and baptism for the dead.

David L. Paulsen, Kendel J. Christensen et al. “Redemption of the Dead: Continuing Revelation after Joseph Smith.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 20 no. 2 (2011).

After Joseph Smith’s death, the Saints still had many questions regarding the soteriological problem of evil and the doctrines about redeeming the dead. This paper details what leaders of the church after Joseph Smith have said in response to these previously unanswered questions. They focus on the nature of Christ’s visit to the spirit world, those who were commissioned to preach the gospel to the departed spirits, the consequences of neglecting the gospel in mortality, and the extent and role of temple ordinances for those not eligible for celestial glory. This paper focuses on both the early and the late teachings of President Joseph F. Smith. It explains the doctrinal and historical contexts for his vision in 1918 and the further insights provided by this vision.

Davidson, Karen Lynn. “The Book of Mormon in Latter-day Saint Hymnody.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 9 no. 1 (2000).

A church member who has loved the Book of Mormon since childhood and who takes it for granted that the Book of Mormon is central to LDS class instruction, general conference addresses, and missionary discussions is likely to be surprised that we have only six Book of Mormon hymns in our 1985 hymnbook. Early hymn writers turned to the Book of Mormon itself for their texts. Twelve Book of Mormon hymns were introduced into Mormon hymnody by Emma Smith’s first hymnal, but the Book of Mormon as a theme almost disappeared from later hymnals. Only one hymn relating to the Book of Mormon was among the forty-nine new hymns added to the 1985 hymnal. In this article, Book of Mormon hymns are listed, discussed, and categorized. Most of the Book of Mormon hymns that have been written are narrative, rather than devotional. Each new hymnbook must meet the needs of its age. Devotional hymns are likely to be more forthcoming as literary appreciation of the Book of Mormon continues to grow.

Davidson, Karen Lynn. “Marilyn Arnold. Sweet is the Word: Reflections on the Book of Mormon-Its Narrative, Teachings, and People.” FARMS Review of Books 9, no. 1 (1997): Article 3.

Review of Sweet is the Word: Reflections on the Book of Mormon? Its Narrative, Teachings, and People (1996), by Marilyn Arnold

Davis, Garold N. and Mark J. Johnson. “H. Clay Gorton, The Legacy of the Brass Plates of Laban: A Comparison of Biblical and Book of Mormon Isaiah Texts.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 7, no. 1 (1995): Article 10.

Review of The Legacy of the Brass Plates of Laban: A Comparison of Biblical and Book of Mormon Isaiah Texts (1994), by H. Clay Gorton.

Davis, Ryan W. “For the Peace of the People: War and Democracy in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 16 no. 1 (2007).

King Benjamin, in an attempt to establish and promote peace, created a form of government that may be understood as democratic. The political system is not a democracy in the way the term is understood today, but the democratic elements become especially clear when viewed next to its autocratic Lamanite counterpart. Davis demonstrates how a democratic system tends to bring more peace to a nation and, interestingly, also more victory when war does come upon them. The young Nephite state encountered the types of risks experienced in the modern progression to democracy, further illustrating how difficult a task it would have been for Joseph Smith to create this world. Although the democratic state played a role in the Nephite nation, the most important lesson in the Book of Mormon’s politics is that God makes all the difference.

Dennis, Ronald D.Llyfr Mormon: The Translation of the Book of Mormon into Welsh.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 11 no. 1 (2002).

In 1840, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints established its first branch in Wales. The branch had been organized and converts baptized without the help of Welsh translations of the Book of Mormon and other church materials. In this specific area in Wales, English was widely spoken; thus translating the Book of Mormon into Welsh had not been a priority. However, after being sent to a different area of Wales by Elder Lorenzo Snow of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, William Henshaw quickly realized that such a translation was imperative to the spreading of the gospel throughout the rest of Wales. In 1845, Captain Dan Jones arrived in Wales as a new missionary. Elder Jones used a press belonging to his brother, a Welsh clergyman, to print church pamphlets that he had translated into Welsh. One of the employees who worked at the press, John S. Davis, eventually was baptized. In 1850, Davis translated the Doctrine and Covenants into Welsh. The next year, he asked the Welsh Saints to subscribe to the official Mormon periodical, which would publish a part of the Book of Mormon each week. The subscriptions would provide the funds necessary to do so. The Saints responded enthusiastically, and as a result, the Welsh translation of the Book of Mormon was eventually all published.

Dorais, Michael J. “The Geologic History of Hill Cumorah.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 13 no. 1 (2004).

This article discusses the geologic processes that occurred to form the Hill Cumorah and surrounding lands that would have made that area attractive to the Smith family and other early settlers and also presents reasons the hill was a suitable location for storing the golden plates for hundreds of years. The causes of glaciation, the definitions and types of glaciers, and the origin and characteristics of drumlins are explored.

Draper, Larry W. “Book of Mormon Editions.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 11 no. 2 (2002).

Larry Draper describes his role in providing Royal Skousen with copies of various early editions of the Book of Mormon for use in the critical text project. Draper also describes the printing process of the Book of Mormon, which process was made clearer because of Skousen’s project. Draper explains the stereotyping method of printing that was used for the 1840 Cincinnati/Nauvoo edition and the 1852 Liverpool edition of the Book of Mormon.

Draper, Richard D.Hubris and Atē: A Latter-day Warning from the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 3 no. 2 (1994).

Civilizations fall due to complex pressures, but the Book of Mormon points to one sin which assisted if not drove the demise of both the Nephite and Jaredite peoples. This sin was pride. This essay ties pride to the Old World concepts of hubris and at? as a means of revealing the dynamic nature of this sin and exploring its deadly character. It shows that pride leads to hubris, the attempt by individuals and nations to become a law unto themselves, and that the consequence of hubris is at?, a spiritual blindness that impels the individual or society toward its doom. The paper warns the Latter-day Saint about this vice.

Draper, Richard D. “The Mortal Ministry of the Savior as Understood by the Book of Mormon Prophets.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2 no. 1 (1993).

The mortal Savior was not man, not human (Alma 34:10). Infinite and eternal, he received his physical life not from a son of Adam but from the Father of Adam, God. He took upon himself the image of man, but in truth he was the model, not the copy. Though mortal, he was still God, able to suffer and to redeem as only a god could. He was Son, because he received physical life from his Father, and Father, because he used his divine powers to give eternal life to others. Though not man, he experienced mortality, which allowed him to understand and love mortals.

Draper, Thomas W. and Lindsey Kenny. “Book of Mormon Parenting.” The FARMS Review 18, no. 1 (2006): Article 3.

Review of Geri Brinley. The Book of Mormon: A Pattern for Parenting.

Duffin, Stephen J. “Pressing Forward: A Real Feast.” FARMS Review of Books 14, no. 1 (2002): Article 7.

Review of Pressing Forward with the Book of Mormon: The FARMS Updates of the 1990s (1999), edited by John W. Welch and Melvin J. Thorne

Duke, James T. “The Literary Structure and Doctrinal Significance of Alma 13:1-9.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 5 no. 1 (1996).

Alma’s sermon at Ammonihah includes a remarkable passage (Alma 13:1–9) that contains a main chiasm as well as four shorter chiasms and four alternates. It also uses synonymia, cycloides, repetition, and an important Nephite idiom (rest). In addition, this passage explains the doctrine of the priesthood and the eternal nature of Christ in conjunction with the priesthood, and introduces the doctrines of a preparatory redemption and the rest of God.

Duke, James T. “Word Pairs and Distinctive Combinations in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 12 no. 2 (2003).

The literary richness of the Book of Mormon is attested by the appearance of word pairs, in both parallel and conjoined pairs. On occasion, combinations of three, four, or even more words appear together more than once. Possible reasons for the scriptural use of word pairs include literary functions, echoes of the law of Moses, theological terms, universals (or merisms), repetition, and mnemonic function. Duke builds on previous studies of word pairs in the Book of Mormon by Kevin Barney and John Tvedtnes. The frequency of word pairs and other combinations of words witnesses to the Hebrew roots of the language of the book.

Dundas, Gregory. “John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks, eds., By Study and Also by Faith, vol. 2.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 4 (1992): Article 53.

Review of By Study and Also by Faith, vol. 2 (1990), edited by John M. Lundquist and Stephen D. Ricks.

E

Easton-Flake, Amy. “Beyond Understanding: Narrative Theory as Expansion in Book of Mormon Exegesis.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 25 no. 1 (2016).
Echohawk, Larry. “With Real Intent: An Unexpected Gift.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 16 no. 1 (2007).

The Pawnee people endured many hardships through the years, but EchoHawk explains that out of that pain was born promise. During his childhood, EchoHawk and his family had no expectation of achieving a higher education, but he, along with all of his siblings, was able to attend college. Through a football accident in high school, he gained the personal testimony he hadn’t possessed when he was baptized at 14. His testimony and his football took him to Brigham Young University, where President Spencer W. Kimball influenced him to become a lawyer, and later the attorney general of Idaho, to help his people and to be an instrument in God’s hands.

Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 1, No. 1 (July 1981).” Insights, Vol. 1, No. 1 (1981). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
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Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 22, No. 10 (October 2002).” Insights, Vol. 22, No. 10 (2002). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 22, No. 11 (November 2002).” Insights, Vol. 22, No. 11 (2002). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 22, No. 2 (February 2002).” Insights, Vol. 22, No. 2 (2002). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 22, No. 3 (March 2002).” Insights, Vol. 22, No. 3 (2002). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 22, No. 4 (April 2002).” Insights, Vol. 22, No. 4 (2002). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 22, No. 5 (May 2002).” Insights, Vol. 22, No. 5 (2002). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 22, No. 6 (June 2002).” Insights, Vol. 22, No. 6 (2002). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 22, No. 7 (July 2002).” Insights, Vol. 22, No. 7 (2002). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 2002).” Insights, Vol. 22, No. 8 (2002). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 22, No. 9 (September 2002).” Insights, Vol. 22, No. 9 (2002). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 23, No. 1 (2003).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2003). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 23, No. 2 (2003).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2003). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 23, No. 3 (2003).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2003). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 23, No. 4 (2003).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2003). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 23, No. 5 (2003).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2003). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 23, No. 6 (2003).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2003). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 24, No. 1 (2004).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2004). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 24, No. 2 (2004).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2004). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 24, No. 3 (2004).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2004). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 24, No. 4 (2004).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2004). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 24, No. 5 (2004).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2004). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 24, No. 6 (2004).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2004). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 25, No. 1 (2005).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2005). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 25, No. 2 (2005).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2005). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 25, No. 3 (2005).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2005). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 25, No. 4 (2005).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2005). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 25, No. 5 (2005).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2005). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 25, No. 6 (2005).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2005). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 3, No. 1 (March 1983).” Insights, Vol. 3, No. 1 (1983). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 3, No. 2 (October 1983).” Insights, Vol. 3, No. 2 (1983). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 4, No. 1 (March 1984).” Insights, Vol. 4, No. 1 (1984). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 4, No. 2 (June 1984).” Insights, Vol. 4, No. 2 (1984). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 4, No. 3 (October 1984).” Insights, Vol. 4, No. 3 (1984). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 5, No. 1 (February 1985).” Insights, Vol. 5, No. 1 (1985). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 5, No. 2 (July 1985).” Insights, Vol. 5, No. 2 (1985). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 5, No. 3 (November 1985).” Insights, Vol. 5, No. 3 (1985). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 6, No. 1 (February 1986).” Insights, Vol. 6, No. 1 (1986). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 6, No. 2 (Summer 1986).” Insights, Vol. 6, No. 2 (1986). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 6, No. 3 (Fall 1986).” Insights, Vol. 6, No. 3 (1986). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 7, No. 1 (Spring 1987).” Insights, Vol. 7, No. 1 (1987). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 7, No. 2 (Summer 1987).” Insights, Vol. 7, No. 2 (1987). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Fall 1987).” Insights, Vol. 7, No. 3 (1987). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 7, No. 4 (Winter 1987).” Insights, Vol. 7, No. 4 (1987). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 8, No. 1 (Spring 1988).” Insights, Vol. 8, No. 1 (1988). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 8, No. 2 (Fall 1988).” Insights, Vol. 8, No. 2 (1988). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 8, No. 3 (Winter 1988).” Insights, Vol. 8, No. 3 (1988). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 9, No. 1 (Spring 1989).” Insights, Vol. 9, No. 1 (1989). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 9, No. 2 (Summer 1989).” Insights, Vol. 9, No. 2 (1989). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Fall 1989).” Insights, Vol. 9, No. 3 (1989). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by FARMS Staff. “Insights, Vol. 9, No. 4 (Winter 1989).” Insights, Vol. 9, No. 4 (1989). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 26, No. 1 (2006).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2006). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 26, No. 2 (2006).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2006). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 26, No. 3 (2006).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2006). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 26, No. 4 (2006).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2006). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 26, No. 5 (2006).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2006). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 26, No. 6 (2006).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2006). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 27, No. 1 (2007).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2007). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 27, No. 2 (2007).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2007). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 27, No. 3 (2007).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2007). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 27, No. 4 (2007).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2007). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 27, No. 5 (2007).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2007). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 27, No. 6 (2007).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2007). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 28, No. 1 (2008).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2008). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 28, No. 2 (2008).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2008). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 28, No. 3 (2008).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2008). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 28, No. 4 (2008).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2008). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 28, No. 5 (2008).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2008). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 28, No. 6 (2008).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2008). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 29, No. 1 (2009).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2009). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 29, No. 2 (2009).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2009). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 29, No. 3 (2009).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2009). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 29, No. 4 (2009).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2009). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 29, No. 5 (2009).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2009). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 29, No. 6 (2009).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2009). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 30, No. 1 (2010).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2010). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 30, No. 2 (2010).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2010). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 30, No. 3 (2010).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2010). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 30, No. 4 (2010).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2010). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 30, No. 5 (2010).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2010). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 30, No. 6 (2010).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2010). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 31, No. 1 (2011).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2011). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.
Edited by Maxwell Institute Staff. “Insights, Vol. 31, No. 2 (2011).” Insights, Vol. 1 (2011). Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies.