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BYU Studies
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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0 — 9
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Bitton, Davis. “N. L. Nelson and The Mormon Point of View.” Brigham Young University Studies 13, no. 2 (1973): 157.
ID = [9530]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1973-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 552  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:04
Hurlbut, Jennifer. “Name as Key-Word: Collected Essays on Onomastic Wordplay and the Temple in Mormon Scripture.” BYU Studies Quarterly 58, no. 1 (2019): 174.
ID = [12390]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1876  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Flake, Chad J. “Name Index to the Library of Congress Collection of Mormon Diaries.” Brigham Young University Studies 12, no. 3 (1972): 319.
ID = [9570]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1972-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 4532  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:04
Smoot, Stephen O., John Gee, Kerry Muhlestein, and John S. Thompson. “The Name of the Lord.” Brigham Young University Studies Quarterly 61, no. 4 (2022): 107.
ID = [81650]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-04  Collections:  abraham,byu-studies  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:15
Dant, Doris R. “Nancy Wiest Nay: Calligrapher.” BYU Studies 31, no. 2 (1991): 192.
ID = [12337]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1991-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1931  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Liu, Timothy. “Nanking.” BYU Studies 29, no. 3 (1989): 48.
ID = [10159]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1989-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 12:22:25
Welch, John W. “Narrating Homicide Chiastically.” Brigham Young University Studies Quarterly 59, no. 2 – Supplement (2020): 151.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

John W. Welch, “Narrating Homicide Chiastically: Why Scriptures about Killings Use Chiasmus,” examines eight chiastic structures that pertain to homicides—three legal texts and five homicide narratives. The legal texts include “The Case of the Blasphemer (Leviticus 24:13–23)” and “The Law of Homicide (Numbers 35).” The narratives include “Abimelech’s Killing of Seventy of His Brothers (Judges 9:56–57)”; “The Case of Phinehas (Numbers 25)”; and “The Slaying of Laban (1 Nephi 4:4–27).” Welch concludes that these eight structures assist readers in recognizing the broader context of each homicide passage and “to discern the key central point on which the case turns.” Welch’s paper also contributes on a further level by cataloguing thirteen possible reasons why authors employed chiasmus when narrating a homicide. These purposes include, “propelling logic and persuasiveness,” “creating order,” “restoring equilibrium,” “processing circumstances,” “probing relevancy,” and “reinforcing memory.”

Keywords: Abimelech; Blasphemy; Chiasmus; Gedaliah; Holofernes; Judith; Laban; Law of Moses; Murder; Nephi (Son of Lehi); Noah (Prophet); Phinehas; Talionic Justice
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
ID = [12745]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,byu-studies,welch  Size: 56648  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:24
Wilcox, Miranda. “Narrating Religious Heritage: Apostasy and Restoration.” BYU Studies Quarterly 60, no. 3 (2021): 213.
ID = [10521]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 31815  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:10
Smith, Julie M. “Narrative Atonement Theology in the Gospel of Mark.” BYU Studies Quarterly 54, no. 1 (2015): 37.
ID = [10837]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 25548  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:13
Ricks, Stephen D. “The Narrative Call Pattern in the Prophetic Commission of Enoch (Moses 6).” BYU Studies Quarterly 26, no. 4 (1986): 97-105.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

There is a striking example of a “narrative” type call in the prophetic commission of Enoch in Moses 6:23–36. This study considers the elements of the narrative call pattern; those elements of this form found in the prophetic commission of Enoch are examined and compared with the biblical narrative call passages.
The report of the prophetic vocation of Enoch in the book of Moses accords with impressive consistency with the call narratives in the Bible. All of the elements of the prophetic call pattern isolated and examined by Habel in the calls of Moses, Gideon, and Jeremiah are also found in the Enoch passage; with one minor exception, the order of the elements in the vocation of Enoch is the same as in the call accounts recorded in the Bible. This additional authenticating detail places Enoch more securely in the tradition of the prophets and the book of Moses more firmly in the form and tradition of the prophetic literature.

Keywords: Book of Moses; Enoch (Prophet)
Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
Old Testament Topics > Enoch
ID = [4680]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1986-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,byu-studies,moses,old-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/27/24 6:17:52
Welch, John W. “The Narrative of Zosimus and the Book of Mormon.” Brigham Young University Studies 22, no. 3 (1982): 311.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This article demonstrates certain similarities existing between texts in 1 Nephi in the Book of Mormon and a little-known document entitled “The Narrative of Zosimus.” The Narrative’s core material was written originally in Hebrew and appears to be at least as old as the time of Christ, and perhaps much older. There is no evidence that any knowledge about the Narrative of Zosimus existed in any English-speaking land prior to the publication of the Book of Mormon.

Keywords: Ancient Documents; Language - Hebrew; Narrative of Zosimus
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > 1 Nephi
ID = [9089]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1982-01-03  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,byu-studies,welch  Size: 464  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:00
Wirthlin, LeRoy S. “Nathan Smith (1762-1828) Surgical Consultant to Joseph Smith.” Brigham Young University Studies 17, no. 3 (1977): 319.
ID = [9313]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1977-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 878  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:02
Walker, Ronald W. “Native Women on the Utah Frontier.” Brigham Young University Studies Quarterly 32, no. 4 (1992): 87.
ID = [39747]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 15:58:22
Novak, Gary F. “Naturalistic Assumptions and the Book of Mormon.” BYU Studies 30, no. 3 (1990): 23-40.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Gary Novak explains the problems caused by looking at religious history through naturalistic assumptions. He uses the naturalistic writings of Dale Morgan and Fawn Brodie to show that such assumptions exclude God from the writing of history, transforming the meaning of faith and eroding collective religious memory.He looks at biases created when Marvin Hill and Leonard Arrington adopt naturalistic assumptions into their writing.

Keywords: Arrington; Brodie; Fawn; Leonard; Naturalistic Writings
ID = [10096]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1990-01-03  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,byu-studies  Size: 433  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 12:22:25
Hales, Brian C. “Naturalistic Explanations of the Origin of the Book of Mormon: A Longitudinal Study.” BYU Studies Quarterly 58, no. 3 (2019): 105-148.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Joseph Smith and his followers declared the Book of Mormon’s supernatural origin—that it was a divinely inspired translation of an ancient-American record, acquired by Joseph through visions and the help of an angel. This explanation, however, was widely rejected by outsiders from the outset. Within weeks after the Book of Mormon’s first pages came off the press, critics promoted “naturalistic explanations”—so called because they are based on scientific observation or natural phenomena—that rejected the possibility of a divine, supernatural origin of the Book of Mormon. To varying degrees, these naturalistic theories continue to be perpetuated today. This article examines the most popular naturalistic explanations for the Book of Mormon longitudinally, which will enable readers to better understand them and why they have waxed and waned in popularity over time.

Keywords: Early Church History; Joseph; Jr.; Naturalistic Explanations for the Book of Mormon; Smith; Translation
ID = [10355]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-03  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,byu-studies,smith-joseph-jr  Size: 92800  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/27/24 20:56:15
King, Arthur Henry. “Nature and the Bourgeois Poet.” Brigham Young University Studies 26, no. 3 (1986): 80.
ID = [10313]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1986-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:09
Wayment, Thomas A. “The Nature of the Pen and Pencil Markings in the New Testament of Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible.” BYU Studies 47, no. 2 (2008): 87.
ID = [11261]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2008-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 27413  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:16
Larson, Clinton F. “Nauvoo.” BYU Studies 31, no. 2 (1991): 180.
ID = [12333]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1991-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1264  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Dyk, Gerrit van. “Nauvoo & Hancock County, Illinois: A Guide to Family History and Historical Sources.” BYU Studies Quarterly 54, no. 1 (2015): 223.
ID = [10855]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 2817  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:13
Babidge, Darrell. “The Nauvoo Music and Concert Hall: A Prelude to the Exodus.” BYU Studies Quarterly 58, no. 3 (2019): 58.
ID = [10354]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 40752  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:09
Black, Susan Easton. “Nauvoo Neighbor: The Latter-day Saint Experience at the Mississippi River, 1843?1845.” BYU Studies Quarterly 51, no. 3 (2012): 141.
ID = [11007]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2012-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 55512  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:14
Mulder, William. “Nauvoo Observed.” BYU Studies 32, no. 1 (1992): 95.
ID = [12286]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 673  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Alexander, Thomas G. “Nauvoo Polygamy: ‘. . . but we called it celestial marriage’” BYU Studies 50, no. 3 (2011): 177.
ID = [11066]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2011-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 11229  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:14
Hartley, William G. “Nauvoo Stake, Priesthood Quorums, and the Church’s First Wards.” BYU Studies 32, no. 1 (1992): 57.
ID = [12284]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 796  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Watson, Elden J. “The Nauvoo Tabernacle.” Brigham Young University Studies 19, no. 3 (1979): 416.
ID = [9241]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1979-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1488  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:01
Tracy, Shannon M. “The Nauvoo Temple Bells.” BYU Studies Quarterly 58, no. 2 (2019): 113.
ID = [10578]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 138313  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:11
Kimball, Stanley B. “Nauvoo West: The Mormons of the Iowa Shore.” Brigham Young University Studies 18, no. 2 (1978): 132.
ID = [9288]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1978-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 632  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:02
Smith, David H. “Nauvoo, a painting.” Brigham Young University Studies 15, no. 4 (1975): 498.
ID = [9412]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1975-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 188  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:03
Rowley, Dennis. “Nauvoo: A River Town.” Brigham Young University Studies 18, no. 2 (1978): 255.
ID = [9297]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1978-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1069  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:02
Murphy, John M. “Nauvoo: Mormon City on the Mississippi River.” BYU Studies 46, no. 3 (2007): 190.
ID = [11313]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2007-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 4129  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:16
Leonard, Glen M. “Nauvoo: The City of Joseph.” Brigham Young University Studies 15, no. 1 (1974): 125.
ID = [9455]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1974-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1831  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:03
Berrett, LaMar C. “Nauvoo—Kingdom on the Mississippi.” Brigham Young University Studies 7, no. 3 (1966): 242.
ID = [9837]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1966-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 803  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:46
Hinckley, Gordon B. “Nauvoo—Sunrise and Sunset on the Mississippi.” BYU Studies 32, no. 1 (1992): 19.
ID = [12280]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 835  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Brown, Lisle G. “Nauvoo’s Temple Square.” BYU Studies 41, no. 4 (2002): 4.
ID = [11571]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2002-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 104757  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:18
Moody, Thurmon D. “Nauvoo’s Whistling and Whittling Brigade.” Brigham Young University Studies 15, no. 4 (1975): 480.
ID = [9410]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1975-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 677  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:03
Embry, Jessie L. “Navajo Tradition, Mormon Life: The Autobiography and Teachings of Jim Dandy.” BYU Studies Quarterly 53, no. 2 (2014): 184.
ID = [10901]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2014-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 6541  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:13
Walker, Ronald W., and Doris R. Dant. Nearly Everything Imaginable: The Everyday Life of Utah’s Mormon Pioneers. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2014.
Display Abstract  

From living in a dugout called the Castle of Spiders to eating so many weeds their skin took on a green cast to losing four children in just a few weeks to diphtheria, nearly everything imaginable happened to the Mormon settlers of Utah Territory. Here are the details of the lives of the common people⿿what they ate, wore, lived in, and celebrated, how they worshipped, and why they endured. Here are the details of the lives of the common people, those who traveled in the dust of the leaders. What they ate, wore, lived in, and celebrated. How they worshiped. Why they endured. This volume begins with Marlin K. Jensen’s eulogy of the uncommonly heroic common Saint. Twenty-one renowned historians then apply nearly every type of source and method imaginable to capture pioneer life’s ordinary rhythms and cycles. In Nearly Everything Imaginable, you’ll find hundreds of vignettes from Utah’s early settlers, including these: Old and young would gather for dancing; everybody came early and left about the midnight hour. The bedrooms opening from the hall were generally filled with babies snugly tucked away, while the mothers enjoyed the dance. The huge fireplaces at either end of the hall were piled high with dry cedar fagots, the flames from which leaped and danced up the chimneys. Candles held in place by three nails driven into wooden brackets were ranged high along the walls. Tickets were paid for in any kind of produce that the fiddlers could be induced to accept. Usually a couple of two-bushel sacks could be seen near the door, into which the dancers deposited their contributions. Father made a plow out of a big forked stock and we boys held it in place while our father pulled it. The stock plow was made of quaking aspen. He fastened it to himself by a strap. We plowed two and a half acres that way, and planted wheat. I always remembered that picture of my father doing the work of a horse.

ID = [75308]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2014-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies,church-history  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 11:00:00
Larson, Clinton F. “‘Neat’ as a Word of Approbation.” BYU Studies 50, no. 4 (2011): 60.
ID = [11047]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2011-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 671  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:14
Heiner, Ronald A. “The Necessity of a Sinless Messiah.” Brigham Young University Studies 22, no. 1 (1982): 5.
ID = [9108]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1982-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 743  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:00
Magleby, David B. “The Necessity of Political Parties and the Importance of Compromise.” BYU Studies Quarterly 54, no. 4 (2015): 6.
ID = [10797]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 29081  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:12
Hart, Edward L. “The Need Beyond Reason.” Brigham Young University Studies 16, no. 4 (1976): 517.
ID = [9355]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1976-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 24708  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:02
BYU Studies. “The Negro’s Civil War.” Brigham Young University Studies 6, no. 3 (1965): 191.
ID = [9875]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1965-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1499  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:46
Alford, Kenneth L. “Nels Anderson’s World War I Diary.” BYU Studies Quarterly 54, no. 1 (2015): 197.
ID = [10849]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 7300  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:13
Memmott, Roger L. “The Neophyte.” Brigham Young University Studies 15, no. 3 (1975): 348.
ID = [9427]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1975-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 506  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:03
Turley, Richard E., Jr. “Nephi Johnson 1908 Statement.” BYU Studies 47, no. 3 (2008): 138.
ID = [11253]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2008-01-03  Collections:  bom,byu-studies  Size: 185  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:16
Cracroft, Richard H. “Nephi, Seer of Modern Times: The Home Literature Novels of Nephi Anderson.” Brigham Young University Studies 25, no. 2 (1985): 3.
ID = [8938]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1985-01-02  Collections:  bom,byu-studies  Size: 1367  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:53:59
Welch, John W. “Nephite Culture and Society.” BYU Studies 38, no. 1 (1999): 221.
ID = [11844]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1999-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies,welch  Size: 1083  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:20
Reynolds, Noel B. “Nephi’s Outline.” Brigham Young University Studies 20, no. 2 (1980): 131.
ID = [9197]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1980-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies  Size: 1114  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:01
Hadfield, M. Gary. “Neuropathology and the Scriptures.” BYU Studies 33, no. 2 (1993): 313.
ID = [12224]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1993-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 35505  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:22
Jackson, Kent P. “‘Never Have I Showed Myself unto Man’: A Suggestion for Understanding Ether 3:15a.” BYU Studies 30, no. 3 (1990): 71.
Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
ID = [10100]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1990-01-03  Collections:  bom,byu-studies  Size: 936  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 12:22:25
Anderson, Carma de Jong. “New Address.” Brigham Young University Studies 4, no. 3 (1962): 208.
ID = [9929]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1962-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 320  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:46
Marsden, George M. “New Age, Old Revelation: Reflections on the Millennial Contexts.” BYU Studies Quarterly 59, no. 2 (2020): 111.
ID = [10394]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 24944  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:09
Anderson, Richard Lloyd. “New Data for Revising the Missouri ‘Documentary History’” Brigham Young University Studies 14, no. 4 (1974): 488.
ID = [9461]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1974-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 975  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:03
Klein, Kevin. “New Deacon.” Brigham Young University Studies Quarterly 61, no. 2 (2022): 104.
ID = [12732]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/25/24 11:51:52
Madsen, Harold S. “A New Direction in Language Testing: Concern for the One.” Brigham Young University Studies 21, no. 2 (1981): 189.
ID = [9157]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1981-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:01
Cross, Frank Moore. “New Directions in the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls.” Brigham Young University Studies 25, no. 3 (1985): 3-11.
Topics:    Old Testament Topics > Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha [including intertestamental books and the Dead Sea Scrolls]
ID = [8920]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1985-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies,old-test  Size: 1042  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:53:59
Jessee, Dean C. “New Documents and Mormon Beginnings.” Brigham Young University Studies 24, no. 4 (1984): 397.
ID = [8979]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1984-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 248  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:00
Taylor, Weldon J. “A New Emphasis for the American Dream.” Brigham Young University Studies 4, no. 3 (1962): 269.
ID = [9936]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1962-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 45638  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:46
Lundberg, Constance K. “New Genesis: A Mormon Reader on Land and Community.” BYU Studies 39, no. 1 (2000): 220.
Topics:    Old Testament Scriptures > Genesis
ID = [11763]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2000-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies,old-test  Size: 1885  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:19
Hansen, George H. “New Geologic Map of Utah.” Brigham Young University Studies 5, no. 3 (1964): 251.
ID = [9908]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1964-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 3323  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:46
BYU Studies. “New Horizons in Biblical Research.” Brigham Young University Studies 8, no. 3 (1968): 356.
ID = [9789]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1968-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1216  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Godfrey, Kenneth W. “A New Look at the Alleged Little Known Discourse by Joseph Smith.” Brigham Young University Studies 9, no. 1 (1968): 49.
ID = [9751]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1968-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1037  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Christensen, Harold T. “The New Morality: Research Bases for Decision in Today’s World.” Brigham Young University Studies 8, no. 1 (1967): 23.
ID = [9810]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1967-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 970  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Webb, Stephen H. “The New Mormon Ecumenicism: Thoughts on Mormonism at the Crossroads of Philosophy and Theology: Essays in Honor of David L. Paulsen.” BYU Studies Quarterly 52, no. 2 (2013): 177.
ID = [10965]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2013-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 22425  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:13
Woodbury, Lael J. “A New Mormon Theatre.” Brigham Young University Studies 10, no. 1 (1969): 85.
ID = [9702]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1969-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 21572  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Woodbury, Lael J. “A New Mormon Theatre (16:1).” Brigham Young University Studies 16, no. 1 (1975): 65.
ID = [10066]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1975-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 21459  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 12:22:25
Smith, Dennis. “New Mormon, a sculpting.” Brigham Young University Studies 10, no. 4 (1970): 419.
ID = [9648]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1970-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 654  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:04
Clark, Dennis Marden. “New Name and Blessing.” Brigham Young University Studies 26, no. 3 (1986): 110.
ID = [8866]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1986-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/1/24 7:58:24
Larsen, David J. “New Perspectives on 2 Enoch: No Longer Slavonic Only.” BYU Studies Quarterly 54, no. 1 (2015): 209.
ID = [10852]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 28964  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:13
Holzapfel, Richard Neitzel. “New Photograph of the Granite Shaft for the Brigham Young Monument.” BYU Studies 39, no. 4 (2000): 98.
ID = [11705]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2000-01-04  Collections:  brigham,byu-studies  Size: 6459  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:19
Holzapfel, Richard Neitzel. “New Photographs of Joseph F. Smith’s Centennial Memorial Trip to Vermont, 1905.” BYU Studies 39, no. 4 (2000): 107.
ID = [11706]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2000-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 12357  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:19
Holzapfel, Richard Neitzel. “New Photographs of the Alberta Canada Temple Site Dedication, 1913.” BYU Studies 39, no. 1 (2000): 204.
ID = [11757]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2000-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 5205  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:19
Holzapfel, Richard Neitzel. “New Photographs of Wilford Woodruff’s Trip to Alaska, 1895.” BYU Studies 39, no. 2 (2000): 144.
ID = [11744]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2000-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 6836  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:19
Wilson, Lynne Hilton. “A New Pneumatology: Comparing Joseph Smith’s Doctrine of the Spirit with His Contemporaries and the Bible.” BYU Studies Quarterly 51, no. 1 (2012): 119.
ID = [11039]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2012-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 96609  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:14
Matthews, Robert J. “The New Publications of the Standard Works—1979, 1981.” Brigham Young University Studies 22, no. 4 (1982): 387.
ID = [9072]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1982-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 685  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:00
Hyer, Paul V. “The New Religions of Korea.” Brigham Young University Studies 9, no. 1 (1968): 109.
ID = [9758]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1968-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 3956  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Rhodes, Richard D., and Michael D. Draper. New Rendition: Paul’s First Epistle to the Corinthians. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2019.
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The New Rendition of the book First Corinthians provides a modern English translation of the Greek text while remaining true to Paul’s intent. This translation is excerpted from Paul’s First Epistle to the Corinthians by Richard D. Draper and Michael D. Rhodes. This new version clarifies many previously vague or misunderstood passages and enlightens the text for today’s readers. This epistle is particularly interesting and important to faithful Christians interested in the Apostle Paul’s testimonies of knowledge, revelation, purity, gifts of the spirit, the sacrament, charity, the resurrection, baptism for the dead, heavenly glory, and many other topics crucial to the life of righteousness. This Rendition is part of the BYU New Testament Commentary series. This scholarly project aims to create a faithful modern English translation together with a full, in-depth, carefully researched Latter-day Saint commentary for each book on the New Testament. More of the New Rendition and commentary volumes will be added in coming months and years. As of 2019, volumes have been published on Mark, Luke, First Corinthians, and Revelation.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
ID = [75309]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 17:26:58
Abbott, Phillip. New Rendition: The Epistle to the Ephesians. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2019.
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The New Rendition of the epistle to the Ephesians provides a modern English translation of the letter’s Greek text. It is excerpted from the forthcoming volume on Ephesians by S. Kent Brown. This Rendition was created by Philip Abbott. The matchless, quiet Epistle to the Ephesians allows glimpses into the tides of Christian life in Asia Minor, modern western Turkey. More than this, from this letter we gain clear views of the premortal council that set events on this earth in motion, of the Savior’s descent into the spirit prison to release its captive souls, of the firm foundation of apostles and prophets that undergirds the church, and of the armor of God that protects a believer from the wiles of the devil. The New Rendition, sensitive to meanings that carry significance for Latter-day Saints, offers a fresh look at eternal truths draped in the letter’s worshipful dress. This Rendition is part of the BYU New Testament Commentary series. This scholarly project aims to create a faithful modern English translation together with a full, in-depth, carefully researched Latter-day Saint commentary for each book on the New Testament. More of the New Rendition and commentary volumes will be added in coming months and years. As of 2019, volumes have been published on Mark, Luke, First Corinthians, and Revelation.

ID = [75310]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 17:28:42
Rhodes, Michael D., and Richard D. Draper. New Rendition: The Epistle to the Hebrews. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2019.
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The rendering of the Greek text of the Epistle to the Hebrews into modern English presents a flowing and easily understood translation of one of the most beautiful biblical studies of the nature and ministry of Christ. The English rendering comes from an extensive and excellent Commentary entitled The Epistle to the Hebrews by Richard D. Draper and Michael D. Rhodes forthcoming in 2019. This translation seeks to correct one of the major problems the King James translators were unable to overcome. These men were classists and knew well the power and beauty of the Attic prose of Plato and Aristotle. Unfortunately, “the rubbed down and difficult Greek” of the New Testament era held a number of mysteries they were unable to solve. This left a number of passages, especially in the dense and difficult writings of the epistles, very hard to understand in their translation. In this new rendering of the Greek text, the current translators have attempted to present the true sense of the New Testament writings as faithfully and clearly as possible in modern English. It strives to balance the esoteric details of a text with the importance of communicating the breadth of its meaning as clearly as possible to English readers. Sometimes grammatical and syntactical forms that make good sense in Greek seem stilted, odd, and even weird when translated word for word into English. The translators’ purpose has been to render the Greek in such a way that an educated reader could readily understand its meaning. They have consistently tried to avoid an overly “literal” translation, which would likely obscure original intents. They have, therefore, followed Bruce Metzger’s dictum to be “as literal as possible, but as free as necessary” in order to communicate to the English reader the meaning of the text. This Rendition is part of the BYU New Testament Commentary series. This scholarly project aims to create a faithful modern English translation together with a full, in-depth, carefully researched Latter-day Saint commentary for each book on the New Testament. As of 2019, volumes have been published on Mark, Luke, First Corinthians, and Revelation. More of the New Rendition and commentary volumes will be added in coming months and years.

ID = [75311]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:19
Smith, Julie M. New Rendition: The Gospel according to Mark. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2019.
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The New Rendition of the Gospel of Mark provides a modern English translation of Mark’s earliest known Greek texts. It is excerpted from The Gospel according to Mark by Julie M. Smith. There is no such thing as perfect translation, even theoretically. This Rendition reflects Julie Smith’s deliberate choice to translate as literally as possible in order to aid the reader in appreciating the literary features of Mark’s text. These include purposeful repetitions, awkward constructions, intentional word choices, and similar features. One exception to the principle of strictly literal translation is that the Greek idioms in Mark are translated with comparable English idioms. A second exception is for culturally specific expressions. For example, “the fourth watch” is translated as “when night was ending,” and “over three hundred denarii” is rendered as “over a year’s wages.” But aside from these two exceptions, the quest for authentic literalism is the overriding concern—even at the cost of smoothness and elegance. There is no doubt that this Rendition will strike the reader as infelicitous at first. But hewing closely to the source text outweighs, in this context, the benefits of attempting to improve the source. This New Rendition will sound a little foreign to LDS readers accustomed to the distinctive register of the King James Version—which strikes the modern reader as elegant, formal, and magisterial. But because the New Rendition more closely reflects the original tone of Mark’s text, readers soon experience this dynamic Gospel more as it would have sounded to a first-century audience: not antiquated, lofty, or reverent but rather common, plain, and impressive. This Rendition is part of the BYU New Testament Commentary series. This scholarly project aims to create a faithful modern English translation together with a full, in-depth, carefully researched commentary for each book on the New Testament. More of the New Rendition and commentary volumes will be added in coming months and years. As of 2019, volumes have been published on Mark, Luke, First Corinthians, and Revelation.

ID = [75312]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:19
Rhodes, Michael D., and Richard D. Draper. New Rendition: The Revelation of John the Apostle. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2019.
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The New Rendition of the book of Revelation provides a modern English translation of the Greek text while remaining true to the Apostle John’s intent. This translation is excerpted from The Revelation of John the Apostle by Richard D. Draper and Michael D. Rhodes. The text of Revelation in the King James Version seems oblique and in some cases inexplicable, but this New Rendition clarifies many misunderstood or misinterpreted passages and helps make John’s powerful testimony more understandable and applicable to the modern disciple. The authors have studied, taught, and published scholarly works on the book of Revelation for decades and aim to make the text accessible with this version. Insights into the meaning of this grand apocalyptic book are drawn from early Christian perspectives, Latter-day Saint scriptures, and a panoply of references to churches, angels, trumpets, seals, signs, beasts, and elders leading to the great marriage supper of the Lamb of God and the establishment of the celestial New Jerusalem. This Rendition is part of the BYU New Testament Commentary series. This scholarly project aims to create a faithful modern English translation together with a full, in-depth, carefully researched Latter-day Saint commentary for each book on the New Testament. More of the New Rendition and commentary volumes will be added in coming months and years. As of 2019, volumes have been published on Mark, Luke, First Corinthians, and Revelation.

ID = [75313]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:19
Huntsman, Eric D., and S. Kent Brown. New Rendition: The Testimony of Luke. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2019.
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The New Rendition of the Gospel of Luke provides a modern English translation of Luke’s Greek text. It is excerpted from The Testimony of Luke by S. Kent Brown. This Rendition was created mainly by Eric D. Huntsman. Luke lays claim to writing more than any other New Testament author. With his Gospel and Book of Acts, this second-generation Christian’s portrait of the world out of which Jesus and his church arose is beyond measure. Here, readers will discover a newly opened window into the life and ministry of Jesus of Nazareth, offering a welcoming vista warmed by the presence of the caring and compassionate Son of God and graced by the personalities, stories (especially of women), and parables (such as the Good Samaritan and the Prodigal Son) that only Luke has preserved. This Rendition is part of the BYU New Testament Commentary series. This scholarly project aims to create a faithful modern English translation together with a full, in-depth, carefully researched Latter-day Saint commentary for each book on the New Testament. More of the New Rendition and commentary volumes will be added in coming months and years. As of the beginning of 2019, volumes have been published on Mark, Luke, First Corinthians, and Revelation.

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
ID = [75314]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 17:37:40
Madsen, Carol Cornwall, and Cherry B. Silver, eds. New Scholarship on Latter-day Saint Women in the Twentieth Century: Selections from the Women‘s History Initiative Seminars, 2003–2004. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2022.
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New Scholarship on Latter-day Saint Women in the Twentieth Century opens dialogue on women’s past experiences and analyzes developments for Mormon women from the Progressive Era through civil rights reforms to the emerging women’s movement. This volume of proceedings covers essays by new and seasoned scholars presented at Women’s History Initiative seminars held in 2003 and 2004.

ID = [75315]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2022-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies,church-history  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 17:38:52
Gillum, Gary P. “New Testament Apostles Testify of Christ.” BYU Studies 38, no. 3 (1999): 218.
ID = [11803]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1999-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 3554  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:19
Draper, Richard D., and Michael D. Rhodes. New Testament Commentary: Epistle to the Hebrews. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2021.
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A verse-by-verse commentary on the New Testament Epistle to the Hebrews. Provides a modern English version of the text. Cites scriptures of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons). Focuses on Jesus Christ and his role as High Priest and Savior, highlighting the saving nature of faith in him. The Epistle to the Hebrews is a faith-filled testimony of Jesus Christ. This commentary is the most comprehensive study of the epistle that Latter-day Saint scholars have yet produced. The commentary removes many of the barriers that hinder the reader from understanding this complex work. The volume is not written for an academic audience but for anyone interested in a detailed examination of this highly spiritual and insightful work. The authors show that although the epistle has been ascribed to the Apostle Paul because its doctrines and approaches are so similar to his, it is actually the work of an unnamed early church authority. The result of this conclusion stresses that the Apostle was not alone in his understanding of the work, ministry, and mission of the Lord. In the past, many non–Latter-day Saint readers have viewed the epistle as a polemic against certain Jews who were making trouble for Jewish Christians. This work finds Hebrews to be primarily a pastoral work carefully designed to encourage its readers to base their lives on nothing more and nothing less than Jesus Christ. The commentary presents the full Greek text alongside the King James Version and the authors’ New Rendition, followed by translation notes and analysis. The translation notes explain the meaning and context of words, phrases, and passages and the choice of words in the New Rendition. The analysis examines the doctrine and teachings of each section, opening the epistle to the reader’s understanding. The work strives to be up to date, comprehensive, scholarly, and as doctrinally sound as possible. It relies on the canon of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Joseph Smith Translation, and teachings of latter-day prophets alongside rigorous biblical scholarship and the original Greek text. This commentary has the same purpose as the epistle itself: to bear witness of the Lord and his lifegiving ministry. This up-to-date commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews provides a unique restoration perspective on the Jewish and first-century Christian themes of Jesus Christ’s authority, priesthood, temples, and faithfulness. Draper and Rhodes make this somewhat neglected and challenging epistle much more understandable through a careful examination of the Greek text accompanied by a side-by-side KJV text and translation notes. Their analysis sections contain numerous invaluable insights gleaned from many decades of teaching. This commentary assists modern readers to gain the scripture study skill of context as Draper and Rhodes elucidate this epistle’s text from both a Semitic and Gentile historical and cultural milieu. — Brent Schmidt, faculty, Department of Religious Education, Brigham Young University–Idaho The commentary on Epistle to the Hebrews is fascinating! As with the other commentaries written by Richard D. Draper and Michael D. Rhodes, we have the Greek text, the translation, and the reasoning behind the translation. The historical, sociopolitical, and religious background they provide is invaluable in fully understanding the inspired (and inspiring) messages of the writer of Hebrews. I find this commentary very accessible. You don’t have to have a background in history or be a biblical scholar. You can dive in where you are at and learn at the feet of masters. I also appreciate the enhanced insights from the inclusion of Latter-day Saint scripture. There are a number of scholarly commentaries on Hebrews, but very few that are accessible to a lay person, and none with a Latter-day Saint perspective. If you are seeking a deeper understanding of Jesus Christ and His Atonement, this commentary will be invaluable. — Eleanor Thorne, administrator with BYU Continuing Education, PhD from University of Missouri–Colombia Draper and Rhodes have written a useful commentary to this important New Testament book. Their commentary is especially helpful for teasing out connections between the ancient writings in the New Testament and the unique contributions of the Restoration. The Epistle to the Hebrews is a book that has a lot of resonance with latter-day scripture and teachings, and Draper and Rhodes’s commentary is written with an ear to that resonance. — Avram Shannon, assistant professor, Department of Ancient Scripture, Religious Education, Brigham Young University

ID = [75316]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 11:00:38
Draper, Richard D., and Michael D. Rhodes. New Testament Commentary: Paul‘s First Epistle to the Corinthians. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2015.
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Of all of Paul’s epistles, First Corinthians may resonate the most with Latter-day Saints. Many of its doctrinal teachings reappear in the Restoration: baptism for the dead, degrees of glory, charity never faileth, the administration of the sacrament, and others. The counsel Paul gave remains remarkably relevant today because conditions and attitudes found in ancient Corinth have reemerged in the postmodern Western world. The Corinthian microcosm was largely a skeptical, materialistic, pluralistic, immoral society whose standards were contrary to those of the Christian community. The Corinthians questioned God, the Resurrection, and the place of the Spirit in their lives. Paul was compelled to address such issues in that society, and the result is an epistle highly germane still today. This book is the most comprehensive study of First Corinthians that LDS scholars have yet produced. It relies on the LDS canon of scripture and the teachings of LDS prophets alongside rigorous biblical scholarship and Paul’s original Greek. Because this commentary relies heavily on the Greek text, the full Greek text is presented along with the King James Version. It also presents a new rendering of the Greek text that makes the text more understandable to modern readers. This rendition is set side by side with the King James text for easy comparison. The commentary contains translation notes and helpful historical and cultural background. The work strives to be as up to date, comprehensive, scholarly, and doctrinally sound as possible. Through examining every verse of First Corinthians, the rich theology of the Atonement, grace, the gifts of the Spirit, the sacrament, love, and resurrection of the dead come alive. Those who read this volume will find in it faith, hope, and understanding of key principles and doctrines. The text bears a strong witness of the Lord Jesus Christ and a clear elucidation of his gospel as articulated by the Apostle Paul. The commentary on Paul’s first epistle to the Corinthians is absolutely enlightening! It provides the Greek text, a translation entitled a “Rendition,” and an in-depth explanation for why most words, phrases, and verses are rendered the way they are. But the authors don’t stop there. They give us the historical, sociopolitical, and religious background necessary to understand Paul’s writing in context. Their discussion of Paul’s teachings is articulate, straightforward, and doctrinally and spiritually insightful. Paul’s message to the Corinthians and the conditions surrounding it have truly come alive for me. This commentary has become an invaluable tool and a regular part of my scripture study. — Eleanor Thorne, Administrator with BYU Continuing Education, PhD from University of Missouri–Columbia Draper and Rhodes’s collaboration on First Corinthians, is, in my estimation, even better than their very solid and substantial commentary on ­Reve­lation. A detailed introduction sets the stage for Paul’s letter by surveying questions of authorship, date, historical background to Corinth, circumstances for writing, unifying themes, and, as a special bonus, a collection of interpretations and famous quotations by LDS authorities for each chapter of the letter, organized in decreasing order of the frequency of comments on the chapter. This commentary advances by light years what previous Mormon projects of this nature have done. — Craig L. Blomberg, Distinguished Professor of New Testament, Denver Seminary Draper and Rhodes collectively have many decades of experience teaching and writing about the New Testament in a faith-promoting manner. This volume examines First Corinthians on many levels, both secular and spiritual. Their rendition closely follows the Greek when possible while also idiomatically and skillfully rendering cryptic and ambiguous passages into plain English. Their analysis often illuminates terms, doctrines, and concepts that sometimes escape traditional New Testament scholarship. Their commentary deeply explores the first-century setting and context of this important letter of Paul. The results are invaluable for students, teachers, leaders, and scholars of all types who seek wisdom by study and also by faith. — Brent J. Schmidt, Professor of Religious Education at Brigham Young University-Idaho, author of Relational Grace: The Reciprocal and Binding Covenant of Charis

ID = [75317]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:19
Brown, S. Kent. New Testament Commentary: The Epistle to the Ephesians. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2022.
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Tucked into the New Testament after Galatians and the Corinthian correspondence, the Epistle to the Ephesians casts a warm, quieting glow when compared to the strident character of Galatians and the rather tough lines that Paul penned to former associates in Corinth. In Ephesians, by contrast, the Apostle Paul has shined a bright light on both an overly generous God the Father, who “is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think” (Eph. 3:20), and the Gentiles whom he has recently welcomed into the celestial fold, making them “no more strangers and foreigners, but fellowcitizens with the saints, and of the household of God” (2:19). But there is much more, for the letter opens on the scene of the premortal council and ends with church members clothed in God’s sacred, protective armor that helps them “to stand against the wiles of the devil,” an indicator of the looming apostasy (6:11). In addition, enfolded within Ephesians is a tightly woven strand of family-centered interests, including an expectation of eternal families, pointers to sacred rituals, and the joyous assurance to believers that Christ “hath raised us up together, and made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus” (2:6). This exalted position is made possible because of one of the grandest gifts that comes from the Father through the Son— “redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins” (2:7). Hallelujah!

Topics:    Book of Mormon Scriptures > Ether
ID = [75318]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2022-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 17:39:48
Smith, Julie M. New Testament Commentary: The Gospel according to Mark. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2019.
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The Gospel of Mark is an undiscovered gem, hiding in plain sight. Mark’s story—at least from the vantage point of a twenty-first-century audience—is virtually unknown. Following broader trends in Christian history, Latter-day Saints have focused on the other Gospels. Mark’s Gospel gets very little attention and, when it does, it is usually read through the lenses of the other Gospels, with the result that Mark’s distinctive voice is muted. But the Jesus presented in Mark’s Gospel is worthy of study: He is a man of action and few words. He is witty, warm, and wise. He’s also the Son of God. He has power which leaves people in awe, and he uses that power to help the people most people don’t like. He hugs little kids. He listens to and learns from women. He banishes demons and reminds parents to feed their children. He doesn’t know everything, but he does know how to end chaos. His disciples usually misunderstand him, but he teaches them continually and patiently. This Jesus is betrayed and abandoned and alone and humiliated, but he still chooses God’s will over his own—even though he didn’t want to. Mark tells an amazing story. The overriding goal of this commentary is to recover Mark’s unique voice. Special attention is given to five areas: An examination of the differences in ancient texts of Mark is used to make conjectures about how the text read in its earliest versions. Basic cultural knowledge is supplied to help the modern reader bridge the gap to the ancient world. Biblical allusions in Mark’s text are explored and explained. Literary structures, both large and small, are considered. The traditional neglect of women’s stories is corrected. The result is a commentary that answers the question, “What would Mark’s story of Jesus have meant to its first audiences?” in a way that informs and inspires Mark’s readers twenty centuries later. No other biblical commentary directed specifically to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints eclipses the quality of Julie Smith’s accomplishment with the Gospel of Mark. It is informed, gracefully composed, accessible, and, most importantly, trustworthy. It opens a range of possible interpretations of key and challenging passages but is not guilty of imposing extraneous meaning on the text. The volume’s preoccupation—“What would this story have meant to Mark’s earliest audiences?”—is judiciously chosen and frees Smith from distractions and diverse thickets. A superb example of what light may emerge from scripture in the company of a competent, faithful, and honest guide. — Philip L. Barlow, Leonard Arrington Professor of Mormon History & Culture, Utah State University Julie Smith’s new commentary on the Gospel of Mark represents an important addition to Latter-day Saint scholarship on the New Testament. Mark is a book that has been somewhat neglected by Latter-day Saints, and Smith’s commentary goes a long way towards correcting that neglect. With its numerous explanatory notes, this commentary takes the Gospel of Mark seriously, both as scripture and as a witness of the mission of Jesus. Where this commentary is especially welcome is in Smith’s thoughtful and thought-provoking treatment of women’s issues in the Gospel and in the scriptures generally. — Avram R. Shannon, Assistant Professor of Ancient Scripture, Brigham Young University Among Latter-day Saints, the Gospel of Mark has often been overshadowed by the other Gospels. This volume aims to restore Mark’s distinct voice so that latter-day audiences can better understand and appreciate his unique testimony of Jesus Christ. By focusing on issues of translation, cultural knowledge, biblical allusions, literary interpretation, and the significance of women’s stories and concerns, this volume impressively narrows the gap between the expectations of modern readers and Mark’s ancient, yet vibrant, testimony of Jesus. — Jacob Rennaker, John A. Widtsoe Fellow of Latter-day Saint Scholarship and Life, Chapman University

ID = [75319]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 11:02:20
Draper, Richard D., and Michael D. Rhodes. New Testament Commentary: The Revelation of John the Apostle. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2013.
Display Abstract  

To read the book of Revelation is to see a myriad of representations pass by our gaze, offering a kaleidoscope of bizarre and incongruent images. This world strikes us at first as fearfully and mysteriously strange and fantastic. But once these symbols are properly deciphered, they combine to present crucial messages for those living in the last days. These messages were designed by God to lead all successfully through these troubled times if they will read, hear, and do his will. This commentary presents a comprehensive analy­sis of John’s book aided by the lens of Latter-­day Saint doctrine and experience. God delivered his messages in the form of images housed within discrete visions, with each symbol explaining, exposing, or emphasizing various aspects of the message conveyed. The challenge is getting beyond the symbols to the represented realities. Information is drawn from all the Standard Works, the Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible, and from modern Prophets and Apostles. Even so, the best of world scholarship has not been overlooked. Because this commentary relies heavily on the Greek text, the full Greek text of the book is presented in sections along with the King James Version and the authors’ new rendition. The commentary contains translation notes and analysis of every verse. The work strives to be as up to date, comprehensive, ­scholarly, and doctrinally sound as possible. Most important, the commentary emphasizes the primary focus of John’s work, “the revelation of Jesus Christ” (Rev. 1:1). The commentary highlights the Apostle’s witness that Jesus is the Lamb of God alive and active in these last days—directing earthly affairs and preparing his Saints and the faithful so that the Father’s intentions will ultimately be accomplished. Hope and promise dominate the work. The Lamb is in charge, and nothing moves beyond the limits he sets. He is coming to “destroy them which destroy the earth” (Rev. 11:18) and to bring his people into triumphant millennial glory. This commentary details how. This is the most ambitious, detailed, and scholarly commentary series on a portion of the Bible ever produced by Latter-day Saints. Perhaps even more noteworthy is the use of the full range of scholarly sources. The new rendition alone could be of great help to Latter-day Saints, especially those who may be wary of modern translations of the Bible outside the Church and nevertheless find the Elizabethan English of the KJV increasingly difficult to navigate. Adela Yarbro Collins has offered the pithiest summary of the Apocalypse I have ever heard: “Jesus wins!” But Draper and Rhodes offer the necessary unpacking of this summary in language that both captures John’s message accurately and highlights humanity’s appropriate response of worship. — Craig Blomberg, Distinguished Professor of New Testament, Denver Seminary Over the years, I’ve dealt with many biblical commentaries, and this one has a very reader-friendly format. It is at its best when introducing ideas about historical and contextual points from various non-LDS scholars. The authors understand that the audience this book is aimed at may not be as familiar with the terms as those who read and use most such commentaries. In fact, this is the strongest point of the book. It is a great step ahead for LDS readers. Naturally, LDS scholars and especially LDS General Authority and LDS scriptural comments are added at appropriate places. This is a book which will be used and referred to for years to come. — Terry L. Hutchinson, attorney and book reviewer for KDXU Radio This is an important contribution and one that should be applauded by those who wish to see, at the very least, a wider understanding of at least some of the concepts and problems expressed by the wider biblical community that otherwise may have no other way of being “safely” expressed from within. While the answers and issues may not be addressed or resolved how all might ideally like them to be, the fact that issues are being expressed and acknowledged from a substantial work by a Church-run institution is in and of itself, at least for me, a major gain. — David Tayman, media developer for technology consulting company and LDS blogger

ID = [75320]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2013-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 11:03:12
Brown, S. Kent. New Testament Commentary: The Testimony of Luke. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2014.
Display Abstract  

Enthroned above all creation towers the exalted, glorified Christ. Descending into the darkest recesses of human agony and sin reaches the warm, caring Jesus. These two are the same person. Luke’s testimony introduces us to this man become God—God the Son. He comes into our world already bearing a divine nature, already carrying divine qualities. His birth is a miracle; he is “Christ the Lord” (Luke 2:11). The most distinguishing element of this line-by-line, word-by-word commentary is its use of Latter-­day Saint scriptures—the Book of Mormon, the Doctrine and Cove­nants, and the Pearl of Great Price—to illuminate Luke’s Gospel. For example, important LDS doctrines arise from Jesus’ activity in the spirit world immediately after his death. More than all other Gospel accounts, Luke captures the compassion and love of the Savior. Such sweet concern manifests itself particularly for the downtrodden and those forced to the margins of society. Within his text, Luke discloses the deep, divine love that runs through his narrative of the Christ. S. Kent Brown combines a lifetime of dedicated study of the ancient world with his reverence for the Bible and insights from restoration scripture to create a readable, relevant, and thought-provoking commentary on the Gospel according to Luke. Beautifully written with a unique sensitivity toward Jesus’ focus on family relationships, the sanctity of the home, and the dangers of materialism, this book invites a fresh view of the Savior’s ministry for a modern world. I am excited to consult it often for both my teaching and research. — Camille Fronk Olson, Chair, Department of Ancient Scripture, BYU Professor Brown’s commentary is an important scholarly achievement. I really cannot say enough about it. On a practical level, this commentary is spiritually enriching and would be a helpful guide for any Christian seeking a closer walk with the one who is the subject of Luke’s testimony. The test of any commentary is how well it makes old words seem young again, and how it illuminates the obscure by drawing overlooked connections while deepening the historical reality from which those words emerge. On that score Professor Brown’s book is a virtuoso performance. — Stephen H. Webb, Catholic Theologian S. Kent Brown is well known among LDS scholars, who have run out of superlatives to describe his work. He has produced the most important LDS commentary on Luke’s Gospel to date. This is his magnum opus, and a reader will be transported to the world of the New Testament to hear Jesus Christ’s voice as he ministered among the people more than two thousand years ago. — Richard Neitzel Holzapfel, Professor of Church History, BYU When I have examined the pages of this book, I have come away with the impression of years of work, sensitivity of much thought, and clear writing. This book is a chest filled with glistening historic and spiritual gems. I have come away rewarded. — Richard L. Anderson, Emeritus Professor of Ancient Scripture, BYU While to be appreciated by scholars, The Testimony of Luke is also a useful resource for the lay reader seeking further insights to textual questions. — Emily Christensen, Deseret News

ID = [75321]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2014-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies,new-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:19
BYU Studies. “New Testament Introduction: The Gospels and Acts.” Brigham Young University Studies 7, no. 1 (1965): 91.
ID = [9860]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1965-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 2335  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:46
Barlow, Philip L. “The New Testament: A Translation for Latter-day Saints: A Study Bible.” BYU Studies Quarterly 58, no. 4 (2019): 165-168.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Thomas Wayment, classics professor at Brigham Young University, has earned a reputation as one of the most capable and reliable Latter-day Saint scholars of the New Testament and the ancient classical world in which Christianity arose. Educated at the Claremont Graduate School of Religion, Wayment generally addresses Latter-day Saint audiences, whose faith he shares. His writing includes credible work on New Testament manuscript traditions, Joseph Smith’s translation of the Bible, and the historical lives of Jesus and Paul. Wayment has now accomplished his most ambitious project to date: a fresh translation, based on the best available Greek manuscripts, of the entire New Testament into a modern, lucid English. Wayment’s translation seeks to serve the perceived needs of English-speaking members of the Church. This goal is evident in both the translation proper and the supplementary material. Wayment explains the need for a New Testament in readily understood modern prose: “Jesus did not speak using archaic English terms and phrases. His speech was quite ordinary [for its time and place]. . . . As language evolves, so too translations need to evolve” (viii). A student of scripture, for example, can with Wayment’s translation conveniently read Jesus’s parable of the wheat and weeds in Matthew 13 without having to look at a footnote to learn what tares are (31–32). But more than mere convenience is at stake in this translation. In many passages, Wayment’s modern English can save a hapless reader from being stumped by intricate Pauline arguments that are entangled in the half-foreign tongue of Jacobian English. Wayment’s modernizing service to us is important. His text is readable and intelligible, hence inviting.

Keywords: Joseph Smith Translation; Language - Greek; New Testament; Study Helps; Translation
ID = [10347]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-04  Collections:  bmc-archive,byu-studies,smith-joseph-jr  Size: 8416  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/27/24 20:56:15
Matthews, Robert J. “The ‘New Translation’ of the Bible, 1830–1833: Doctrinal Development During the Kirtland Era.” Brigham Young University Studies 11, no. 4 (1971): 400-422.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This article will attempt to look at the Church in the early 1830s and, so far as it is possible, will trace the introduction of several important doctrinal concepts into the Church during that time. In this context we will discuss the role of new translation of the Bible in the restoration of the gospel in this dispensation. When speaking of the “development” of the Church doctrine, we do not mean particularly to dwell on an evolutionary phenomena but rather simply to emphasize that all of the doctrines were not revealed at once and that there has been a developmental increase of doctrine from continuing revelation. It is in the spirit of this principle that we trace the historical relationship that exists between Joseph Smith’s new translation of the Bible and the increase of doctrine during the Kirtland period.

Keywords: Age of Accountability; Joseph Smith Translation; Kirtland; Marriage; Ohio; Revelation; School of the Prophets
Topics:    Old Testament Topics > Bible: Joseph Smith Translation (JST)
ID = [9603]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1971-01-03  Collections:  bmc-archive,byu-studies,old-test  Size: 825  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:04
Partridge, Dixie Lee. “New under the Sun: Awaiting a Birth.” BYU Studies 41, no. 1 (2002): 140.
ID = [11617]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2002-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1296  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:18
Albrecht, Stan L. “New Views of Mormon History: Essays in Honor of Leonard J. Arrington.” BYU Studies 28, no. 1 (1988): 123.
ID = [10236]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1988-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1652  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 12:22:26
Welch, Lane. “A New Witness to the World.” Brigham Young University Studies Quarterly 61, no. 2 (2022): 191.
ID = [12737]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1437  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/25/24 19:21:16
Madsen, Carol C. “The ‘New Woman’ and the Woman’s Exponent: An Editorial Perspective.” BYU Studies Quarterly 59, no. 3 (2020): 71.
ID = [10413]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 55191  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:10
Richardson, Nathan. “New York Doll.” BYU Studies 46, no. 2 (2007): 321.
ID = [11331]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2007-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 7693  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:16
Hartley, William G. “Newel and Lydia Bailey Knight’s Kirtland Love Story and Historic Wedding.” BYU Studies 39, no. 4 (2000): 6.
ID = [11700]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2000-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 33593  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:19
Flake, Chad J. “The Newell K. Whitney Collection.” Brigham Young University Studies 11, no. 4 (1971): 322.
ID = [9601]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1971-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 30021  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:04
Slover, Robert H. “A Newly Discovered 1838 Wilford Woodruff Letter.” Brigham Young University Studies 15, no. 3 (1975): 349.
ID = [9428]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1975-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 738  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:03
BYU Studies. “The Newly Established Asian Research Institute.” Brigham Young University Studies 6, no. 3 (1965): 121.
ID = [9862]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1965-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 719  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:46
Packer, Trevor. “The Newly Found Manuscript of Doctrine and Covenants Section 65.” BYU Studies 33, no. 2 (1993): 331.
ID = [12226]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1993-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies,d-c  Size: 11936  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:22
Morris, Robert J. “News From Molokai.” Brigham Young University Studies 17, no. 3 (1977): 379.
ID = [9321]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1977-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 6373  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:02
Grover, Mark L. “The Next Christendom: The Coming of Global Christianity.” BYU Studies 46, no. 3 (2007): 177.
ID = [11306]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2007-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 8735  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:16
Cranney, Stephen. “The Next Mormons: How Millennials Are Changing the LDS Church.” BYU Studies Quarterly 58, no. 2 (2019): 177.
ID = [12374]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Davis, D. Morgan. “The Niche of Lights.” BYU Studies 40, no. 4 (2001): 269.
ID = [11639]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2001-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 3475  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:18
Bennion, Mark D. “The Night before My Baptism.” BYU Studies 40, no. 3 (2001): 48.
ID = [11646]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2001-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 539  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:18
Howe, Susan Elizabeth. “Night Jogging in the City.” BYU Studies 31, no. 3 (1991): 30.
ID = [12316]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1991-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 889  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:23
Lambert, Neal E. “Nightfall at Nauvoo.” Brigham Young University Studies 12, no. 3 (1972): 331.
ID = [9575]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1972-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1471  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:04
St Cyr, Genevieve. “The Nightingale.” Brigham Young University Studies 3, no. 1 (1960): 64.
ID = [9992]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1960-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1716  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:47
Pearson, Carol Lynn. “‘Nine Children Were Born’: A Historical Problem from the Sugar Creek Episode.” Brigham Young University Studies 21, no. 4 (1981): 441.
ID = [9128]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1981-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1249  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:01
Hall, Randall L. “Nine Moons.” BYU Studies 34, no. 4 (1995): 108.
ID = [12127]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1995-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 729  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 12:34:25
Hunter, J. Michael. “Nineteenth-Century Saints at War.” BYU Studies 46, no. 3 (2007): 189.
ID = [11312]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2007-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 2007  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:16
Cohen, Charles L. “No Man Knows My Psychology: Fawn Brodie, Joseph Smith, and Psychoanalysis.” BYU Studies 44, no. 1 (2005): 55.
ID = [11477]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2005-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 48060  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:17
Gedicks, Frederick M. “‘No Man’s Land’: The Place of Latter-day Saints in the Culture War.” BYU Studies 38, no. 3 (1999): 145.
ID = [11795]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1999-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 34390  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:19
Allen, James B. No Toil nor Labor Fear: The Story of William Clayton. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2011.
Display Abstract  

Joining the Church in 1838 catapulted William Clayton into new activities and associations, took him from England to the United States, and offered him soul-satisfying spiritual experiences. As Joseph Smith’s friend and scribe, Clayton kept extensive journals and was the one who recorded the revelation on plural marriage. He also wrote the first history of the Nauvoo Temple. As a pioneer, Clayton wrote the words to the hymn “Come, Come Ye Saints,” and compiled the Latter-day Saints’ Emigrants’ Guide. He was among Salt Lake City’s original settlers and worked in a variety of religious, economic, and civil activities. Clayton was faithful, but he had his share of human frailties. Even though his wives considered him a good husband—so far as plural marriage allowed—why did some divorce him? William Clayton’s life encompassed nearly all the joys and struggles that could come to a Church member of his day. Yet “no toil nor labor” did he fear. His story, in many respects, echoes the soul-stirring words of his immortal Mormon pioneer anthem.

ID = [75322]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2011-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies,church-history  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 17:40:27
Melville, R. Mark. “No Weapon Shall Prosper: New Light on Sensitive Issues.” BYU Studies Quarterly 52, no. 1 (2013): 190.
ID = [10985]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2013-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 2511  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:14
Dodds, Elizabeth. “No Words.” BYU Studies Quarterly 56, no. 1 (2017): 135.
ID = [10718]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 9694  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:12
Bushman-Carlton, Marilyn. “Nobody Can.” BYU Studies 40, no. 3 (2001): 120.
ID = [11648]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2001-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1329  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:18
Lively, Robert L., Jr. “A Non-Mormon Religion Professor’s Impressions of Mormon Missionaries.” BYU Studies 33, no. 1 (1993): 151.
ID = [12245]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1993-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 19263  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:22
Backman, Milton V., Jr. “A Non-Mormon View of the Birth of Mormonism in Ohio.” Brigham Young University Studies 12, no. 3 (1972): 306.
ID = [9566]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1972-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 485  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:04
Robinson, Stephen E. “The Noncanonical Sayings of Jesus.” BYU Studies 36, no. 2 (1996): 74.
ID = [11977]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1996-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 30468  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:20
Wright, Walker A., and Don Bradley. “‘None That Doeth Good’” Brigham Young University Studies Quarterly 61, no. 3 (2022): 123.
ID = [81691]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies,jst  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/23/24 16:04:15
Lee, Chong-Sik. “North Korea: Between Dogmatism and Revisionism.” Brigham Young University Studies 12, no. 1 (1971): 39.
ID = [9587]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1971-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 36982  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:04
Best, Rita Ann. “Nostalgia.” Brigham Young University Studies 20, no. 1 (1979): 38.
ID = [9209]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1979-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:01
Whittaker, David J. “Not for Tourists: Richard Bushman’s Joseph Smith: Rough Stone Rolling.” BYU Studies 45, no. 3 (2006): 158.
ID = [11386]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2006-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 27980  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:16
Embry, Jessie L. “Not in Vain: The Inspiring Story of Ellis Shipp, Pioneer Woman Doctor.” Brigham Young University Studies 25, no. 3 (1985): 128.
ID = [8935]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1985-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 2071  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:53:59
Johnson, Sherrie Mills. “Not of This Fold.” BYU Studies 36, no. 4 (1996): 106.
ID = [11927]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1996-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 301  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:20
Bennett, Richard E. “Not the First but the Second: Changing Latter-day Saint Emphases on Joseph Smith’s First Vision.” BYU Studies Quarterly 59, no. 2 (2020): 167.
ID = [10397]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 36302  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:09
Holland, Jeffrey R. “A Note on Mormon Americana at Yale.” Brigham Young University Studies 10, no. 3 (1970): 386-388.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

No abstract available.

Keywords: Early Church History; Mormon Americana
ID = [9678]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1970-01-02  Collections:  bmc-archive,byu-studies  Size: 6079  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:44
Carmack, Noel A. “A Note on Nauvoo Theater.” BYU Studies 34, no. 1 (1994): 94.
ID = [12172]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1994-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 7621  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 12:34:25
Fletcher, Dale T. “A Note on Provo Temple Site, 1968.” Brigham Young University Studies 10, no. 4 (1970): 454.
ID = [9654]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1970-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 57  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:44
Flake, Chad J. “A Note on Reviewing Books.” Brigham Young University Studies 15, no. 1 (1974): 118.
ID = [9453]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1974-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 4515  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:03
Godfrey, Kenneth W. “A Note on the Nauvoo Library and Literary Society.” Brigham Young University Studies 14, no. 3 (1974): 386.
ID = [9474]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1974-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 968  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:03
Fletcher, Dale T. “A Note on ‘Baling Hay at Ganado’” Brigham Young University Studies 8, no. 4 (1968): 424.
ID = [9764]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1968-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 2170  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Eaton, Valoy. “A Note on ‘Day of the Lamanite’” Brigham Young University Studies 11, no. 2 (1971): 150.
ID = [9624]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1971-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies  Size: 2000  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:04
Fletcher, Dale T. “A Note on ‘First Snow—Leonia’” Brigham Young University Studies 8, no. 2 (1968): 144.
ID = [9795]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1968-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 2060  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Morgan, John. “A Note on ‘Food for Flowers’” Brigham Young University Studies 10, no. 1 (1969): 66.
ID = [9700]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1969-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1921  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Fletcher, Dale T. “A Note on ‘In the Sun’” Brigham Young University Studies 9, no. 4 (1969): 470.
ID = [9716]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1969-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 2124  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Burnside, Wesley M. “A Note on ‘Landscape with Cabin and Pond’” Brigham Young University Studies 9, no. 2 (1969): 182.
ID = [9739]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1969-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 2053  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Fletcher, Dale T. “A Note on ‘Sawing Wood’” Brigham Young University Studies 8, no. 1 (1967): 47.
ID = [9814]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1967-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1441  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Fletcher, Dale T. “A Note on ‘The Hudson from Heine Cook’s’” Brigham Young University Studies 8, no. 3 (1968): 308.
ID = [9777]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1968-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1680  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Patten, Benton P. “A Note on ‘The Return’” Brigham Young University Studies 10, no. 3 (1970): 322.
ID = [9674]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1970-01-02  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1253  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:44
Magleby, Francis R. “A Note on ‘Troilus and Cressida’” Brigham Young University Studies 9, no. 1 (1968): 66.
ID = [9756]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1968-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1645  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 7:57:45
Breinholt, Floyd E. “A Note on ‘Utah Ranch’” Brigham Young University Studies 11, no. 1 (1970): 34.
ID = [9634]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1970-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 892  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:04
Gee, John. “Notes on the Egyptian Motifs in Mozart’s Magic Flute.” BYU Studies 43, no. 3 (2004): 149.
ID = [11506]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2004-01-03  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 16310  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:17
Matthews, Robert J. “Notes on ‘Lehi’s Travels’” Brigham Young University Studies 12, no. 3 (1972): 312-314.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

No abstract available.

Keywords: Arabia; Lehi (Prophet)
ID = [9567]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1972-01-02  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,byu-studies  Size: 6850  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:04
Harper, Steven C. “‘Nothing Less Than Miraculous’: The First Decade of Mormonism in Mongolia.” BYU Studies 42, no. 1 (2003): 19.
ID = [11563]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2003-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 57739  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:18
Crowe, Chris. “A Novel Idea.” BYU Studies Quarterly 60, no. 4 (2021): 4.
ID = [10528]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 29124  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:10
Allred, David A. “Now You See It, Now You Don?t: Biblical Perspectives on the Relationship between Magic and Religion.” BYU Studies 50, no. 4 (2011): 166.
ID = [11052]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2011-01-04  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 7434  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:54:14
Campbell, Douglas. “Nuclear War and Computer-Generated Nuclear Alerts.” Brigham Young University Studies 25, no. 1 (1985): 77.
ID = [8952]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1985-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 1140  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:53:59
Larson, Clinton F. “Nuclear Winter.” Brigham Young University Studies 25, no. 1 (1985): 99.
ID = [8957]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1985-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/24/24 7:53:59
Hickman, Trenton L. “Nursing Jehovah.” BYU Studies 34, no. 1 (1994): 41.
ID = [12166]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1994-01-01  Collections:  byu-studies  Size: 380  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 12:34:25
Lund, Nancy R. “Nurturing Faith through the Book of Mormon: The 24th Annual Sperry Symposium.” BYU Studies 36, no. 1 (1996): 198.
ID = [12018]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1996-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies  Size: 3123  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 6/14/24 12:34:24

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