Select Page
Book of Mormon Bibliography
Alphabetical by Title

See the icons used for the links to the available media types for an article

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0 — 9
J
Gabbott, Mabel Jones. “Jacob.” Children’s Friend 61 (August 1962): 34-35.
Display Abstract  

A children’s story of Jacob from the time he was born in the wilderness to his meeting with Sherem, the anti-Christ.

ID = [79623]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1962-08-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Warner, C. Terry. “Jacob.” Ensign, October 1976.
ID = [43361]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1976-10-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 21801  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:57:52
Hardy, Grant R. “Jacob.” In The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ, ed. Grant Hardy. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2019.
ID = [37206]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:46
Halverson, Taylor. “Jacob 1-4. Seek the Kingdom of God.” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 5, 2016.
ID = [4981]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2016-03-05  Collections:  bom,interpreter-website  Size: 16952  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:45:01
Ensign. “Jacob 1–4.” Ensign March 2020.
ID = [63361]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 2020-03-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 2771  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:06:15
Swift, Hales. “Jacob 2: Economics, Plural Marriage, and the New World.” The Interpreter Foundation website. March 20, 2020.
ID = [6458]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2020-03-20  Collections:  bom,interpreter-website  Size: 14515  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:45:13
Skousen, Royal. “Jacob 4-6: Substantive Textual Variants.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1992. This paper has been prepared for presentation at the F. A.R.M.S. conference on “The Olive and Jacob 5,” the Fifth Annual F.A.R.M.S. Lecture on the Book of Mormon.
ID = [8586]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-reports  Size: 998  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 9:59:59
Skousen, Royal. “Jacob 4–6: Substantive Textual Variants between Manuscripts and Editions.” In The Allegory of the Olive Tree: The Olive, the Bible, and Jacob 5, edited by Stephen D. Ricks and John W. Welch, 105-139. Provo, UT/Salt Lake City: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies/Deseret Book, 1994.
Display Keywords
Keywords: Critical Text; Jacob (Son of Lehi); Textual History; Textual Variants
ID = [75486]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1994-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:20
Underwood, Grant. “Jacob 5 in the Nineteenth Century.” In The Allegory of the Olive Tree: The Olive, the Bible, and Jacob 5, edited by Stephen D. Ricks and John W. Welch, 50-69. Provo, UT/Salt Lake City: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies/Deseret Book, 1994.
Display Keywords
Keywords: Botany; Horticulture; Jacob (Son of Lehi); Olive Tree; Zenos (Prophet)
ID = [75484]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1994-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:20
Ensign. “Jacob 5–7.” Ensign March 2020.
ID = [63362]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 2020-03-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 2859  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:06:15
Tanner, John S. “Jacob and His Descendants as Authors.” In Rediscovering the Book of Mormon, edited by Sorenson, John L., and Melvin J. Thorne, 52-66. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1991.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

The writings of Jacob and his descendants form part of the small plates, a section of the Book of Mormon that Mormon included intact, presumably without editing. Only on the small plates may Joseph Smith have found someone’s “handwriting” other than that of Mormon or Moroni. Speaking in the first person, Jacob and his descendants seem more individual, even in translation, than other writers whose words were more obviously edited by Mormon and Moroni. From Jacob through Omni, the record displays the complex variety one expects of a text written by many hands. The stylistic diversity of Jacob and his descendants is a powerful witness that we are dealing with material written by several ancient authors rather than by one person in early nineteenth-century New York.

Keywords: Abinadom (Son of Chemish); Amaleki (Son of Abinadom); Authorship; Chemish (Brother of Amaron); Enos; Jacob (Son of Lehi); Jarom; Omni; Recordkeeping; Words of Mormon
ID = [75622]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1991-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-books  Size: 30289  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:21
“Jacob and Sherem.” Friend 20 (February 1990): 8-10.
Display Abstract  

An illustrated story for children about Jacob and Sherem.

ID = [79624]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1990-02-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Boyce, Duane. “Jacob Did Not Make a False Prediction.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 33 (2019): 161-174.
Display Abstract  

Review of Adam S. Miller, “Reading Signs or Repeating Symptoms,” in Christ and Antichrist: Reading Jacob 7, eds. Adam S. Miller and Joseph M. Spencer (Provo, Utah: Neal A. Maxwell Institute, 2017), 10 pages (chapter), 174 pages (book).

Abstract. The Neal A. Maxwell Institute recently published a volume on the encounter between Jacob and Sherem in Jacob 7. Adam Miller’s contribution to this book is a reiteration of views he published earlier in his own volume. One of Miller’s claims is that Jacob made a false prediction about the reaction Sherem would have to a sign if one were given him — an assertion that is already beginning to shape the conventional wisdom about this episode. This shaping is unfortunate, however, since the evidence indicates that this view of Jacob’s prediction is a mistake. Once we see this, it is easier to avoid other mistakes that seem evident in Miller’s approach.

ID = [3563]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 32212  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:42
Smoot, Stephen O. “Jacob — The Prophet of Social Justice.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 41 (2020): 211-218.
Display Abstract  

Review of Deidre Nicole Green, Jacob: A Brief Theological Introduction (Provo, UT: The Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship, 2020). 148 pages. $9.99 (paperback).Abstract: Deidre Nicole Green, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship, offers an analysis of the theology of the book of Jacob with her new contribution to the Institute’s brief theological introduction series to the Book of Mormon. Green focuses on the theology of social justice in Jacob’s teachings, centering much of her book on how the Nephite prophet framed issues of atonement and salvation on both personal and societal levels. Her volume offers some intriguing new readings of otherwise familiar Book of Mormon passages.

ID = [3457]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 16668  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:41
Tanner, John S. “Jacob, Son of Lehi.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism, ed. Daniel H. Ludlow, vol. 2. New York: Macmillan, 1992.
Display Keywords
Keywords: Jacob (Son of Lehi), Prophet
ID = [74625]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,eom  Size: 7016  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:54:03
Avant, Gerry. “Jacob: A Man of Great Faith, A Mighty Prophet.” Church News 54 (29 January 1984): 11.
Display Abstract  

Jacob had great faith, saw a vision of the Messiah, presented powerful exhortations, and succeeded Nephi as leader of his people.

ID = [79625]  Status = Type = newspaper article  Date = 1984-01-29  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
McConkie, Joseph Fielding. “Jacob: Ancient Witness of a Modern Christ.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1996. Transcript of a lecture given at the FARMS Book of Mormon Lecture Series.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Joseph McConkie offers a profile of the Book of Mormon prophet Jacob and discusses two themes taught by Jacob—the scattering and gathering of Israel and his testimony of the mission of Christ. The current gathering in Israel is temporal, not spiritual. From the Book of Mormon perspective, the gentiles are those who come from the gentile nations, even if they are of Ephraim, and are not Jewish nationals.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; Christ
ID = [8527]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 1996-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-reports  Size: 213  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 9:59:58
Morrise, Martha Pettijohn. “Jacob: Firstborn in the Wilderness.” Ensign, September 1993.
ID = [51151]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1993-09-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 643  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:00:56
Matthews, Robert J. “Jacob: Prophet, Theologian, Historian.” In The Book of Mormon: Jacob through Words of Mormon, To Learn with Joy, eds. Monte S. Nyman and Charles D. Tate Jr.,, 33–53. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1990.
ID = [36845]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1990-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-bom,rsc-books  Size: 41285  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:44
Matthews, Robert J. “Jacob: Prophet, Theologian, Historian.” In A Book of Mormon Treasury: Gospel Insights from General Authorities and Religious Educators,, 173–91. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2003.
ID = [36163]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2003-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size: 41052  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:39
Thomas, M. Catherine. “Jacob’s Allegory: The Mystery of Christ.” In The Allegory of the Olive Tree: The Olive, the Bible, and Jacob 5, edited by Stephen D. Ricks and John W. Welch, 11-20. Provo, UT/Salt Lake City: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies/Deseret Book, 1994.
Display Keywords
Keywords: Allegory of the Olive Tree; Jacob (Son of Lehi); Zenos (Prophet)
ID = [75482]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1994-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:20
Christensen, Kevin. “Jacob’s Connections to First Temple Traditions.” Insights 23, no. 4 (2003).
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

In a previous report I showed how the Book of Mormon’s portrayal of Nephi, son of Lehi, compares favorably to a preexilic Hebrew wisdom tradition reconstructed by biblical scholar Margaret Barker.1 This report highlights further connections between the Book of Mormon and traditions from ancient Israel that Barker asserts “have been lost but for the accidents of archaeological discovery and the evidence of pre-Christian texts preserved and transmitted only by Christian hands.”

Keywords: Book of Mormon; traditions; Jacob; temple
ID = [66715]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2003-01-04  Collections:  bom,farms-insights  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:05:38
Mansfield, M. W. “Jacob’s Isle.” Improvement Era 7, no. 4 (1904): 264-267.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This article discusses the writings in the Bible and Book of Mormon that use the term “isles” and discusses what land is referred to by the prophets.

Keywords: Book of Mormon Geography, Discourse, Isle of the Sea, Jacob (Son of Lehi), Linguistic Analysis
ID = [76905]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1904-02-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,improvement-era  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:30
Bowen, Matthew L. “Jacob’s Protector.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 27 (2017): 229-256.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The name Jacob (yaʿăqōb) means “may he [i.e., God] protect,” or “he has protected.” As a hypocoristic masculine volitive verbal form,
it is a kind of blessing upon, or prayer on behalf of the one so named that he will receive divine protection and safety (cf. Deuteronomy 33:28). Textual evidence from Nephi’s writings suggests that his brother Jacob’s protection was a primary concern of their parents, Lehi and Sariah. Lehi saw Nephi as the specific means of divine protection for Jacob, his “first born in the wilderness.” Moreover, the term “protector” is used twice in LDS scripture, in both instances by Jacob himself (2 Nephi 6:2; Jacob 1:10), this in reference to Nephi, who became the “great protector” of the Nephites in general and Jacob in particular. All of the foregoing is to be understood against the backdrop of the patriarch Jacob’s biography. Lehi, Nephi, Jacob, and Enos all expressed their redemption in terms reminiscent of their ancestor Jacob’s being “redeemed … from all evil,” a process which included Jacob “wrestling” a divine “man” and preparing him to be reconciled to his estranged brother by an atoning “embrace.” Mormon employed the biblical literary etymology of the name Jacob, in the terms “supplant,” “usurp,” or “rob” as a basis for Lamanite accusations that Nephites had usurped them or “robbed” them of their birthright. Mormon, aware of the high irony, shows that the Gadianton [Gaddianton] robbers take up the same polemic. The faithful Lehites, many of whom were descendants of two Jacobs, prayed “May the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, protect this people in righteousness, so long as they shall call on the name of their God for protection” (3 Nephi 4:30). By and large, they enjoyed the God of Jacob’s protection until they ceased to call upon their true protector for it.

ID = [3674]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 63356  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:43
Hamblin, William J. “Jacob’s Sermon (2 Nephi 6-10) and the Day of Atonement.” Paper presented at the 2012 Temple on Mount Zion Conference. September 22, 2012.
ID = [6855]  Status = Type = video  Date = 2012-09-22  Collections:  bom,interpreter-website  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:45:15
Welch, John W. “Jacob’s Ten Commandments.” In Reexploring the Book of Mormon: A Decade of New Research, ed. John W. Welch. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1992.
Display Keywords
Keywords: Decalogue; Jacob (Son of Lehi); Ten Commandments
ID = [66461]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-books,welch  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:05:37
Hilton, John, III. “Jacob’s Textual Legacy.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 22 no. 2 (2013).
Display Abstract  

While Jacob records 15,000 words in the Book of Mormon, he is often underappreciated, perhaps living in the shadow of his older brother Nephi. This study illustrates how Nephi, King Benjamin, and Moroni used Jacob’s words and expanded the influence of his literary legacy.

ID = [3298]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2013-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size: 50319  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:40
Smith, Sherrie D. “Jade: Stones of Light.” Zarahemla Record 24-26 (Spring, Summer, Fall 1984): 4-5.
Display Abstract  

Examines the criteria for the substance of the 16 Jaredite stones. The author argues that jade fits each criteria of the substance that was used.

ID = [79626]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1984-04-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Ensign. “James E. Talmage (1862–1933).” Ensign March 2010.
ID = [58692]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 2010-03-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 1718  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:01:28
Ricks, Brian W. “James E. Talmage and the Doctrine of the Godhead.” Religious Educator Vol. 13 no. 2 (2012).
ID = [38201]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 2012-01-02  Collections:  bom,rel-educ  Size: 62927  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:54
Flake, Lawrence R. “James Edward Talmage.” In Prophets and Apostles of the Last Dispensation. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2001.
ID = [36555]  Status = Type = book chapter  Date = 2001-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size: 4288  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:42
Hart, Edward L. “James H. Hart’s Contribution to Our Knowledge of Oliver Cowdery and David Whitmer.” BYU Studies 36, no. 4 (1996): 118-124.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Most Latter-day Saints take for granted the existence of portraits of the Three Witnesses, but in fact no likeness of Oliver Cowdery was available to the Church until 1883, and then it was touch-and-go whether one would be obtained. Had it not been for the faith and tenacity of James H. Hart, who pursued the portrait when others had failed, we might never have known just what Oliver Cowdery looked like. In the course of following the trail of the portrait, Hart was also able to conduct important interviews with David Whitmer.

Keywords: Cowdery; David; Oliver; Three Witnesses; Whitmer
ID = [11929]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1996-01-04  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,byu-studies  Size: 7210  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:00:25
Thompson, Stephen E. “James R. Harris, Sr., Southwestern American Indian Rock Art and the Book of Mormon.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 4 (1992): Article 48.
Display Abstract  

Review of Southwestern American Indian Rock Art and the Book of Mormon (1991), by James R. Harris Sr.

ID = [123]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 29173  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:17
Interpreter Foundation. “Jan J. Martin on ‘Charity, Priest, and Church versus Love, Elder, and Congregation: The Book of Mormon’s connection to the debate between William Tyndale and Thomas More’” The Interpreter Foundation website. August 15, 2015.
ID = [5137]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2015-08-15  Collections:  bom,interpreter-website  Size: 564  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:45:03
Hoskisson, Paul Y. “Janus Parallelism: Speculation on a Possible Poetic Wordplay in the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 40 (2020): 61-70.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In this article, Paul Hoskisson discusses the question of whether Janus parallelism, a sophisticated literary form found in the Hebrew Bible and elsewhere in manuscripts of the ancient Near East, might also be detected in the Book of Mormon. Because the Book of Mormon exists only in translation, answering this question is not a simple matter. Hoskisson makes the case that 1 Nephi 18:16 may provide the first plausible example of Janus parallelism in the Book of Mormon. [Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.See Paul Hoskisson, “Janus Parallelism: Speculation on a Possible Poetic Wordplay in the Book of Mormon,” in “To Seek the Law of the Lord”: Essays in Honor of John W. Welch, ed. Paul Y. Hoskisson and Daniel C. Peterson (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation, 2017), 151–60. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/to-seek-the-law-of-the-lord-essays-in-honor-of-john-w-welch-2/.].

ID = [3468]  Status = Checked by JA Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 22061  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:41
Neilson, Reid L. The Japanese Missionary Journals of Elder Alma O. Taylor, 1901–10. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2011.
Display Abstract  

Called to the Japan Mission at age eighteen, Alma O. Taylor and his parents would have been shocked had they known his mission would last nearly nine years. Alma, the eighteen-year-old lad, would return a twenty-seven-year-old man, having served one of the longest continuous missions in Church history. For eight and a half years (August 1901–January 1910), Alma worked with intense fervor, keeping a detailed journal of his experiences and impressions. Alma’s journal recaptures early Mormonism in Japan through the eyes of a young missionary. The body of this book is devoted to making his writings available for the first time to all those interested in the foundational events of the Church in Japan. Alma’s many accomplishments included learning both the spoken and written Japanese word; assisting in the translation of missionary tracts, Church hymns, and the Book of Mormon; serving as president of the Japan Mission from his early to late twenties; opening new proselyting areas throughout Japan; and finding, teaching, converting, and strengthening many of the early Japanese Saints. Shortly before Alma left his mission, he recorded his feelings about his final year in Japan: “During the year I have had many experiences some the most pleasant in life and some the most bitter that humans are called upon to experience. . . . Great is the debt of gratitude I owe to the Lord for His many blessings.”

ID = [75358]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2011-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies,church-history  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:19
Numano, Jiro. “The Japanese Translation of the Book of Mormon: A Study in the Theory and Practice of Translation.” M. A. thesis, Brigham Young University, 1976.
Display Abstract  

Discusses theory of translation and applies it to the Book of Mormon. Argues that the Japanese translation of the book, although it is claimed to be colloquial, is too literal and hard to read. Considers the translation not sufficiently aware of Hebrew idioms or of the Jewish and Egyptian cultures from which the Book of Mormon originated.

ID = [80495]  Status = Type = thesis  Date = 1976-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:58:55
Valletta, Thomas R. “Jared and His Brother.” In The Book of Mormon: Fourth Nephi Through Moroni, ed. Monte S. Nyman and Charles D. Tate Jr., 303–22. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1995.
ID = [36730]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1995-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-bom,rsc-books  Size: 42186  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:43
Nibley, Hugh W. “Jared on the Steppes.” In Lehi in the Desert; The World of the Jaredites; There Were Jaredites, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 5. Salt Lake City/Provo, UT: Deseret Book and Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1988.
ID = [2018]  Status = Type = book chapter  Date = 1988-01-01  Collections:  bom,nibley  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:31
Butterworth, F. Edward. “Jaredite Barges.” The Witness: Newsletter of the Foundation for Research on Ancient America 21 (Spring 1992): 3.
Display Abstract  

Reprinted from Butterworth’s Pilgrims of the Pacific. Independence, MO: Herald House, 1974. Two photographs and a diagram offer explanations of a possible design for Jaredite barges.

ID = [79627]  Status = Type = newsletter article  Date = 1992-04-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Zobell, Albert L., Sr. “Jaredite Barges.” Improvement Era 44, no. 4 (1941): 211, 252.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

In this article, passages relating to the Jaredites are used as a basis for examining different aspects of the Jaredite journey including the design of the barges, a possible route of their journey, and their qualifications as ship builders.

Keywords: Jaredite Barges, Jaredites, Shipbuilding, Transoceanic Voyage
ID = [76824]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1941-04-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,improvement-era  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:29
Little, James A. “The Jaredite Colony to America.” Juvenile Instructor 13 (15 September 1878): 208-9.
Display Abstract  

Retelling of the story of the voyage of the Jaredites to America.

ID = [80496]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1878-09-15  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:58:55
Little, James A. “The Jaredite Colony to America.” Juvenile Instructor 13, no. 18 (1878): 208-209.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Retelling of the story of the voyage of the Jaredites to America.

Keywords: Ancient Near East, Book of Mormon Geography, Brother of Jared, Jaredite, Prophecy
ID = [75899]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1878-09-15  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:23
Little, James A. “The Jaredite Colony to America.” Juvenile Instructor 13, no. 18 (1878): 208-209.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Retelling of the story of the voyage of the Jaredites to America.

Keywords: Ancient Near East, Book of Mormon Geography, Brother of Jared, Jaredite, Prophecy
ID = [76510]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1878-09-15  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:27
Nibley, Hugh W. “Jaredite Culture: Splendor and Shame.” In Lehi in the Desert; The World of the Jaredites; There Were Jaredites, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 5. Salt Lake City/Provo, UT: Deseret Book and Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1988.
ID = [2019]  Status = Type = book chapter  Date = 1988-01-01  Collections:  bom,nibley  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:31
Thompson, John S. “The Jaredite Exodus: A Literary Perspective of a Historical Narrative.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 3, no. 1 (1994): 104-112.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

The application of some techniques of literary analysis to the Jaredite exodus narrative in Ether 1–3 and 6 reveals that it is more than just a historical account. The author or editor of the narrative uses imagery and dialogue to help the reader look beyond the historical facts and see elements of the creation, Christ, and temples, among other things.

Keywords: Creation; Jaredite; Jaredite Exodus; Jesus Christ; Literature; Narrative; Temple
ID = [2861]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1994-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 20383  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:37
Griffin, Tyler J. “The Jaredite Journey: A Symbolic Reflection of Our Own Journey along the Covenant Path.” In Illuminating the Jaredite Records, ed. Daniel L. Belnap. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2020.
ID = [34012]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:42
Sjodahl, Janne M. “The Jaredite Lands.” Improvement Era 42, no. 6 (1939): 336-337, 370-371.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This article is an analysis of the geographical statements given in the Book of Ether and possible North American correlations.

Keywords: Book of Mormon Geography, Book of Mormon Geography – North America, Ether (Book of), Jaredites
ID = [77033]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1939-06-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,improvement-era  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:31
Judd, Frank F., Jr. “Jaredite Zion Societies: Hope for a Better World.” In The Book of Mormon: Fourth Nephi Through Moroni, ed. Monte S. Nyman and Charles D. Tate Jr., 147–52. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1995.
ID = [36719]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1995-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-bom,rsc-books  Size: 12516  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:43
Hobby, June M. “Jaredite-Nephite Armor and Weaponry: Reflections upon the Work of Christopher Reinhold.” Zarahemla Quarterly 2/3 (1988): 30-31.
Display Abstract  

The Zapotec Indians are identified as the Western Jaredites and the Maya, the Eastern Jaredites. Artifacts have been found that depict men wearing helmets.

ID = [79628]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1988-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Petersen, Mark E. The Jaredites. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1984.
Display Abstract  

Explains the story of the Jaredites; includes biblical references and charts listing the Jaredite kings.

ID = [78523]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1984-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:42
Tanner, Morgan W. “Jaredites.” In Encyclopedia of Mormonism, ed. Daniel H. Ludlow, vol. 2. New York: Macmillan, 1992.
Display Keywords
Keywords: Ancient America, Ether (Prophet), Jaredite
ID = [74629]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,eom  Size: 13741  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:54:03
Smith, Robert F. Jaredites & Manassites: The Ethnological Foundations of the Book of Mormon, vol. II. Deep Forest Green Books, 2022.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This book explores the literate and advanced cultures of two very separate groups in the Book of Mormon, (1) the Jaredites described in the book of Ether, and (2) the members of tribal Manasseh who dominate the remainder of the Book of Mormon. The first group flourished during the millennia before the arrival of the second group in a nearby area, and became extinct as a civilization not long after the arrival of that second group. Within the New World, only one complex culture arose which was literate, built great cities, and had a large population, namely the Olmec of southern Mexico -- the \"mother culture\" of the five subsequent advanced cultures of Mesoamerica. This book demonstrates how the Mesopotamian Jaredites brought with them a Sumero-Akkadian culture to the New World. The linguistics of Sumero-Akkadian are not only found systematically within the Jaredite onomasticon, but a comparison of Sumero-Akkadian with reconstructed ancient Olmec (Proto-Mixe-Zoque) strongly suggests the ultimate origin of that people in Mesopotamia at least 5 thousand years ago. In the second section of the book, an offshoot of tribal Manasseh (Clan Lehi) demonstrates its pervasive influence through an onomasticon almost exclusively showing derivation from Manassite names known from the Bible and archeology, and which are collocated geographically with each other and with a set of names known biblically to be associated with transjordanian tribes and southern areas, such as Midian (where Clan Lehi first goes to make good its escape from Judah).

Keywords: Book of Mormon,Jaredites,Manassites,Sumero-Akkadian,Olmec
ID = [81936]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2022-12-28  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Barrett, Robert T. “The Jaredites Leave Babel.” Friend 20 (April 1990): 20-21.
Display Abstract  

An illustrated story for children that tells of the Jaredites leaving Babel in order to find the promised land.

ID = [80497]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1990-04-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:58:55
Stewart, David Grant. The Jaredites Were Black. United States: National Translator Certification Service, 1984.
Display Abstract  

Written as a discussion between three friends. It is proposed that the Jaredites were descendants of Naphtahim, son of Mizraim, grandson of Noah who left Egypt shortly after the confusion of tongues. They were black and had no priesthood, but were highly blessed of the Lord. It is thought that they were Olmecs who occupied Mexico.

ID = [78524]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1984-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:42
Brinley, Douglas E. “The Jaredites: A Case Study in Following the Brethren.” In A Book of Mormon Treasury: Gospel Insights from General Authorities and Religious Educators, 427-441. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2003.
Display Keywords
Keywords: Ether (Book of); Jaredites; Obedience; Revelation
ID = [36177]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2003-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,rsc-books  Size: 29459  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:39
Brinley, Douglas E. “The Jaredites—A Case Study in Following the Brethren.” In The Book of Mormon: Fourth Nephi Through Moroni, From Zion to Destruction, eds. Charles D. Tate Jr. and Monte S. Nyman. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1995.
ID = [36711]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1995-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-bom,rsc-books  Size: 29109  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:43
Spencer, Joseph M. “Jared’s Two Daughters.” In Illuminating the Jaredite Records, ed. Daniel L. Belnap. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2020.
ID = [34009]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:42
Hardy, Grant R. “Jarom.” In The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ, ed. Grant Hardy. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2019.
ID = [37208]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:47
Tvedtnes, John A. “Jerald and Sandra Tanner, Answering Mormon Scholars: A Response to Criticism of the Book ‘Covering Up the Black Hole in the Book of Mormon, vol. 1’.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 6, no. 2 (1994): Article 15.
Display Abstract  

Review of Answering Mormon Scholars: A Response to Criticism of the Book “Coving Up the Black Hole in the Book of Mormon” (1994), by Jerald and Sandra Tanner.

ID = [191]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1994-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 109312  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:18
Hamblin, William J. “Jerald and Sandra Tanner, Archaeology and the Book of Mormon.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 5 (1993): Article 41.
Display Abstract  

Review of Archaeology and the Book of Mormon (1972), by Jerald Tanner and Sandra Tanner

ID = [158]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1993-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 38266  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:18
Norwood, L. Ara. “Jerald and Sandra Tanner, Covering Up the Black Hole in the Book of Mormon.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3 (1991): Article 17.
Display Abstract  

Review of Covering Up the Black Hole in the Book of Mormon (1990), by Jerald and Sandra Tanner.

ID = [104]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1991-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 29694  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:17
Roper, Matthew P. “Jerald and Sandra Tanner, Covering Up the Black Hole in the Book of Mormon.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3 (1991): Article 18.
Display Abstract  

Review of Covering Up the Black Hole in the Book of Mormon (1990), by Jerald and Sandra Tanner.

ID = [105]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1991-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 42406  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:17
Tvedtnes, John A. “Jerald and Sandra Tanner, Covering Up the Black Hole in the Book of Mormon.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3 (1991): Article 19.
Display Abstract  

Review of Covering Up the Black Hole in the Book of Mormon (1990), by Jerald and Sandra Tanner.

ID = [106]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1991-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 105249  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:17
“Jerald and Sandra Tanner’s Distorted View of Mormonism: A Response to Mormonism—Shadow or Reality?” Salt Lake City: n.p., 1977.
Display Abstract  

Response to many of the criticisms raised by Mormon critics Jerald and Sandra Tanner, written by an anonymous LDS historian. Pages 43-62 deals with Mormon concepts of scripture, revelation, and translation. Although the Book of Mormon frequently quotes biblical scripture, it does so in much the same way as Jesus and other New Testament writers quote from the Old Testament, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Jewish Apocryphal writings.

ID = [77918]  Status = Type = manuscript  Date = 1977-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Wipper, Frank F. Jerald Tanner’s Brochure on Mormonism Re-examined: Just A Friendly Discussion. Fresno, CA: Vanity, 196?.
Display Abstract  

Author bears fervent testimony of the Book of Mormon and pleads with Tanner to reconsider his evaluation of the book. Wipper condemns Utah Mormonism and the RLDS church as well.

ID = [77919]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1960-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Seely, David Rolph, and S. Kent Brown. “Jeremiah’s Imprisonment and the Date of Lehi’s Departure.” Religious Educator Vol. 2 no. 1 (2001).
ID = [38099]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 2001-01-01  Collections:  bom,old-test,rel-educ  Size: 46570  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:53
Brown, S. Kent, and Peter N. Johnson, eds. “Jerusalem at the Time of Lehi.” In Journey of Faith: From Jerusalem to the Promised Land
ID = [75520]  Status = Type = book chapter  Date = 2006-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:21
Meservy, Keith H. “Jerusalem at the Time of Lehi and Jeremiah.” Ensign, January 1988, 22–25.
ID = [48399]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1988-01-01  Collections:  bom,ensign,old-test  Size: 13954  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:58:04
Brown, S. Kent. “Jerusalem Connections to Arabia in 600 B.C.” In Glimpses of Lehi’s Jerusalem, eds. John W. Welch, David Rolph Seely, and Jo Ann H. Seely, 625—46. Provo, Utah: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2004.
ID = [39706]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2004-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-books,old-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:53:03
Szink, Terrence L. “Jerusalem in Lehi’s Day.” The FARMS Review 16, no. 2 (2004): 149-159.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Review of John W. Welch, David Rolph Seely, and Jo Ann H. Seely, eds. Glimpses of Lehi’s Jerusalem.

Keywords: Ancient Near East; Jerusalem (Old World); Lehi (Prophet)
ID = [485]  Status = Type = review  Date = 2004-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-review  Size: 24228  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:20
Hanson, Paul M. Jesus Christ among the Ancient Americans. Independence, MO: Herald House, 1945, [R]1947 & 1959.
Display Abstract  

Submits archaeological, anthropological, and historical evidence to validate the Book of Mormon. Topics include Israelite origin of Native Americans, native American myths, Quetzalcoatl—the tall white god who may have been Jesus Christ—and linguistic similarities between Hebrew words and words from Mayan, Incan, and Mexican languages.

ID = [77920]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1959-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Millet, Robert L. “Jesus Christ and the Gathering of Israel.” In I Glory in My Jesus: Understanding Christ in the Book of Mormon, eds. Hilton, John, III, Nicholas J. Frederick, Mark D. Ogletree, and Krystal V. L. Pierce. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2023.
ID = [81581]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books,rsc-sperry  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:02
Calabro, David M. “Jesus Christ as a Revealer of Ordinances in the Book of Mormon.” In I Glory in My Jesus: Understanding Christ in the Book of Mormon, eds. Hilton, John, III, Nicholas J. Frederick, Mark D. Ogletree, and Krystal V. L. Pierce. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2023.
ID = [81592]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2023-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books,rsc-sperry  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:02
Skinner, Andrew C. “Jesus Christ as Father in the Book of Mormon.” In The Fulness of the Gospel, eds. Camille Fronk Olson, Brian M. Hauglid, Patty Smith, and Thomas A. Wayment. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2003.
ID = [36233]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2003-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books,rsc-sperry,rsc-video  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:40
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Jesus Christ Lives Today!. Salt Lake City: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1970?.
Display Abstract  

Pamphlet that explains that the Bible and the Book of Mormon bear witness of the divinity of Jesus Christ.

ID = [77921]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1970-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Ballard, Melvin J. “Jesus Christ Visits America.” Deseret News Church Section (29 December 1934): 2, 7.
Display Abstract  

Recounts Christ’s visit to the Nephites in the Americas. Refers to external evidences, such as the Mexican calendar stone and Joseph Smith’s witnesses, that help support the truth and divinity of the Book of Mormon.

ID = [79629]  Status = Type = newspaper article  Date = 1934-12-29  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Farr, Beth Richards. Jesus Christ Visits the Americas: A Book of Mormon Story for Children. Salt Lake City: Little One’s Books, 1977.
Display Abstract  

Large drawings designed for children illustrate the text of 3 Nephi, wherein Jesus visited the Nephites and blessed the children.

ID = [77922]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1977-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Jesus Christ, Savior and Mediator of Mankind. Salt Lake City: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1970.
Display Abstract  

A pamphlet that declares that the Book of Mormon and the Bible bear witness of Christ’s mission in two hemispheres. A brief history of how the Book of Mormon came forth is given.

ID = [77923]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1970-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Madsen, John M. “Jesus Christ, the Son of the Living God.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, April 1993.
ID = [17152]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 1993-04-01  Collections:  bom,general-conference  Size: 7630  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:06:14
Madsen, John M. “Jesus Christ, the Son of the Living God.” Ensign, May 1993.
ID = [50984]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1993-05-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 7555  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:00:55
Benson, Ezra Taft. “Jesus Christ—Gifts and Expectations.” Devotional, Brigham Young University, December 10, 1974.
Display Keywords
Keywords: Jesus Christ
ID = [68405]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 1974-12-10  Collections:  bom,byu-speeches  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:05:52
Roberts, B. H. “Jesus is God Revealed.” Deseret News Church Section (22 November 1930): 1.
Display Abstract  

Christ is God manifested. If men would know God, all they have to do is hold up a clear vision of the Christ. Christ appeared to the people in Bountiful after his resurrection.

ID = [79630]  Status = Type = newspaper article  Date = 1930-11-22  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Talmage, James E. “Jesus Is the Christ.” Improvement Era 66, no. 12 (1963): 1051, 1112.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This article unites the Bible and the Book of Mormon in bearing witness that Jesus is the Christ. It gives an examination of the two texts reveals sixteen important facts concerning Christ’s mission, including his premortal and antemortal Godhood, his foreordination as the Redeemer, and the predictions of his birth to Mary. The testimony of two witnesses—the Bible and the Book of Mormon—establishes the truth.

Keywords: Intertextuality, Jesus Christ, Jesus Christ, Nature of, Jesus Christ, Prophecies about, Jesus Christ—Redeemer
ID = [76733]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1963-12-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,improvement-era,talmage  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:29
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: North Western States Mission. Jesus Is the Christ. Portland, OR: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1975.
Display Abstract  

Reports concerning Jesus Christ’s visit to the Americas, and encourages those interested in the Bible and the life of Christ to study the Book of Mormon.

ID = [77924]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1975-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Roberts, B. H. “Jesus is the Christ—The Eternal God.” Liahona 23 (1925): 29-31.
Display Abstract  

Gives the purpose of the Book of Mormon; identifies Jesus Christ as deity and discusses the “Light of Christ”

ID = [79631]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1925-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
“Jesus Lives and Loves Us All.” Friend 7 (April 1977): 40-41.
Display Abstract  

A story for children about Christ’s ministry to the Nephites after his resurrection.

ID = [79632]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1977-04-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Dias, Laurence C. Jesus Says “It Is Written”: An Address to All Believers in the Bible and the Book of Mormon. Erie, PA: Laurence C. Dias of the Church of Christ,n.d.
Display Abstract  

Using a compilation of biblical passages supported by Book of Mormon passages, this booklet presents a narrative concerning Christ’s role and doctrine, interspersed with commentary by the compiler.

ID = [77925]  Status = Type = book  Date = 0000-00-00  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Nelson, Russell M. “Jesus the Christ—Our Master and More.” In The Book of Mormon: Helaman Through 3 Nephi 8, According To Thy Word, ed. Monte S. Nyman and Charles D. Tate, Jr., 1–14. Provo, Utah: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1992.
ID = [36796]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-bom,rsc-books  Size: 25458  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:44
Roberts, B. H. “Jesus the Creator.” Deseret News Church Section (6 December 1930): 1.
Display Abstract  

Refers to Jesus as the “Creator of all things,” as well as “the Father of Heaven and of Earth” This same thought is repeated in the Book of Mormon by Mosiah, Alma, Nephi, and Moroni in connection with the idea that Jesus is “the Creator”

ID = [79633]  Status = Type = newspaper article  Date = 1930-12-06  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Roberts, B. H. “Jesus the Redeemer.” Deseret News Church Section (13 December 1930): 1.
Display Abstract  

Jesus came that he might redeem the children of men from the Fall, and because they are redeemed they are free (2 Nephi 2:22-27). Resurrection from the dead is as universal as death—therefore Jesus is referred to as the Redeemer.

ID = [79634]  Status = Type = newspaper article  Date = 1930-12-13  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Roberts, B. H. “Jesus the Savior.” Deseret News Church Section (20 December 1930): 1.
Display Abstract  

Scriptural passages point out the difference in Christ as a “Redeemer” and Christ as a “Savior” (Alma 22:14; Helaman 15:18). Christ’s work brings universal redemption from physical death through resurrection, and brings salvation from the effects of individual sin through faith and repentance.

ID = [79635]  Status = Type = newspaper article  Date = 1930-12-20  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Matthews, Robert J. “Jesus the Savior in 3 Nephi.” In The Book of Mormon: 3 Nephi 9–30, This Is My Gospel, eds. Monte S. Nyman and Charles D. Tate Jr. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1993.
ID = [36734]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1993-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-bom,rsc-books  Size: 31430  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:43
“Jesus: Dominant Figure.” Church News 39 (4 October 1969): 16.
Display Abstract  

Shows that Jesus Christ is the most significant personality in the Book of Mormon. Notes his appearances to the Nephites.

ID = [79636]  Status = Type = newspaper article  Date = 1969-10-04  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Ludlow, Victor L. “Jesus’ Covenant Teachings in Third Nephi.” In Rediscovering the Book of Mormon, edited by Sorenson, John L., and Melvin J. Thorne, 177-185. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1991.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

The title page of the Book of Mormon states that the first purpose of the book is “to show unto the remnant of the House of Israel what great things the Lord hath done for their fathers; and that they may know the covenants of the Lord, that they are not cast off forever.” This means that the Book of Mormon is intended, in part, to teach Lehi’s descendants about the covenants that the Lord has made with them. The key covenant they will learn about is that they would be a blessing for all nations—a consecrated people of God. Beyond teaching about the covenants, the Book of Mormon also prophesies key signs and events that will demonstrate when the promised covenant is being fulfilled in the latter days.

Keywords: 3 Nephi; Covenant; Prophecy; Title Page
ID = [75632]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1991-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-books  Size: 17615  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:21
Bassett, Arthur R. “Jesus’ Sermon to the Nephites.” Ensign, February 1978.
ID = [43962]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1978-02-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 18214  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:57:57
Ludlow, Victor L. Jesus’ “Covenant People Discourse” in 3 Nephi: With Old Testament Background and Modern Application. Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Religious Studies Center, 1988.
Display Abstract  

The first purpose of the Book of Mormon as stated on the title page is to demonstrate to the remnant of the House of Israel the great things the Lord has done for their fathers, and to show that because of past covenants latter-day generations are not excluded from divine interest.

ID = [77926]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1988-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Bucci, Timothy D. Jew and the American Indian. 3rd edition. Monongahela, PA: Church of Jesus Christ (Bickertonites), 1968.
Display Abstract  

Gives a brief history of the Jewish people and biblical references concerning their future, then lists Book of Mormon prophecies relating to the future of the American Indian.

ID = [77927]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1968-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Ricks, Stephen D., and John A. Tvedtnes. “Jewish and Other Semitic Texts Written in Egyptian Characters.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 5 no. 2 (1996).
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

An Egyptian script was possibly used to write Hebrew text on the Nephite record. Documents from the correct location and time period have texts and languages in varying scripts that lend credence to this scribal phenomenon.

Keywords: Egyptian; Language; Language - Hebrew; Writing
ID = [2938]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1996-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 21608  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:37
Fowles, John L. “The Jewish Lectionary and Book of Mormon Prophecy.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 3 no. 2 (1994).
Display Abstract  

The reading schedule of the Law and the Prophets in the Jewish synagogue at the time of the Feast of Dedication relates Old Testament prophesies in Ezekiel 37 to the coming forth of the Book of Mormon.

ID = [2876]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1994-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size: 12404  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:37
Tvedtnes, John A. “Jewish Seafaring and the Book of Mormon.” FARMS Review of Books 10, no. 2 (1998): 147-155.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Review of The Children of Noah: Jewish Seafaring in Ancient Times (1998), by Raphael Patai

Keywords: Seafaring; Ship; Transoceanic Voyage
ID = [309]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1998-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-review  Size: 20338  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:19
Spackman, Randall P. “The Jewish/Nephite Lunar Calendar.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 7, no. 1 (1998): 48-59, 71.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Nephite record keepers were very meticulous in monitoring the passage of time. Lehi’s departure from Jerusalem in the reign of Zedekiah marks the beginning of one formal reckoning of time. The prophesied 600-year window to the birth of Christ could well have been measured in lunar years. Lehi must have drawn on familiar Israelite calendrical practices to establish his calendar. Lehi’s descendants likely used twelve lunar months for their calendar without adding an occasional thirteenth month to adjust for the length of a solar year, which would solve the chronological problem of dating Lehi’s departure 600 years before the birth of Christ.

Keywords: Birth of Christ; Calendar System; Chronology; Jewish; Lunar Calendar; Nephite; Record Keeper
ID = [2980]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1998-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 46216  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Phelps, William W. “The Jews.” Evening and the Morning Star Vol. 1, no. 7: December 1832: 51-53.
Display Abstract  

Addresses the prospect of the return of the Jews to Jerusalem to rebuild the holy city. Light is thrown on the subject by quoting passages from the Book of Mormon.

ID = [80861]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1832-12-01  Collections:  bom,em-star  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:58:57
“Jews and Mayans.” Church News 43 (16 June 1973): 16.
Display Abstract  

Tells of a stone carving, found in Mayan ruins, which bears resemblance to similar carvings found among Jewish ruins. This suggests that ancient America had some connections with ancient Israel.

ID = [79637]  Status = Type = newspaper article  Date = 1973-06-16  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Nibley, Hugh W. “The Jews and the Caravan Trade.” In An Approach to the Book of Mormon, Collected Works of Hugh Nibley, vol. 6, 3rd ed. Salt Lake City/Provo, UT: Deseret Book and Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1988.
Display Abstract  

In this work the Book of Mormon is seen in a new perspective; we see it in a world setting, not in a mere local one. It takes its place naturally alongside the Bible and other great works of antiquity and becomes one of them.

ID = [2036]  Status = Type = book chapter  Date = 1988-01-01  Collections:  bom,mi,nibley  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:31
Cohen, Irving H. The Jews in Relation to the Book of Mormon, Jews of Torah. Scotia, NY: Cumorah, 1967.
Display Abstract  

Shows how the Torah was revealed. Argues that the Bible is incomplete and that the Book of Mormon should be esteemed as highly as the Bible. Uses Ezekiel 37:16-17, 2 Nephi 29, and Moroni 10 in his discussion of the importance of the Book of Mormon.

ID = [78525]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1967-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:42
Tooley, Edgar. “Job Hunting According to Nephi.” Ensign, February 2013.
ID = [60044]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 2013-02-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 6116  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:05:47
Stirling, Mack C. “Job: An LDS Reading.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 45 (2021): 137-180.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Mack C. Stirling examines the well-known story of Job, one of the literary books of the Bible and part of the Wisdom literature (which is heavy in temple mysticism and symbols), and proposes the story follows the temple endowment to the T. Following Hugh Nibley’s lead in The Message of the Joseph Smith Papyri, the temple endowment is not discussed. Stirling focuses only on Job’s story, drawing on analysis of literary genres and literary tools, like chiasms, focusing on the existential questions asked by the ancient author. Doing this, he concludes that Job’s is a story about a spiritual journey, in which two main questions are answered: “(1) Is it worthwhile to worship God for His own sake apart from material gain? (2) Can man, by coming to earth and worshipping God, enter into a process of becoming that allows him to participate in God’s life and being?” What follows is an easy to read exegesis of the Book of Job with these questions in mind, culminating with Job at the veil, speaking with God. Stirling then discusses Job’s journey in terms of Adam’s journey — beginning in a situation of security, going through tribulations, finding the way to God and being admitted into His presence — and shows how this journey is paralleled in Lehi’s dream in the Book of Mormon (which journey ends at a tree of life). This journey also is what each of us faces, from out premortal home with God, to the tribulations of this telestial world, and back to the eternal bliss of Celestial Kingdom, the presence of God, through Christ. In this way, the stories of Adam and Eve, of Job, and of Lehi’s dream provide a framework for every human’s existence.
[Editor’s Note: Part of our book chapter reprint series, this article is reprinted here as a service to the LDS community. Original pagination and page numbers have necessarily changed, otherwise the reprint has the same content as the original.
See Mack C. Stirling, “Job: An LDS Reading,” in Temple Insights: Proceedings of the Interpreter Matthew B. Brown Memorial Conference, “The Temple on Mount Zion,” 22 September 2012, ed. William J. Hamblin and David Rolph Seely (Orem, UT: The Interpreter Foundation; Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2014), 99–144. Further information at https://interpreterfoundation.org/books/temple-insights/.].

ID = [3402]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 64451  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:41
Johnston, James F. W. “Joe Smith and the Mormons.” Harpers Monthly (1851): 64-66.
Display Abstract  

A polemical article against Mormonism. The writer considers the Book of Mormon “as desultory and feeble imitation of the Jewish chronicles and prophetic books” and represents little more than “a succession of unconnected rhapsodies and repetitions” addressed to a very ignorant audience. After giving a brief account of the Book of Mormon narrative, the writer ridicules the account of the Jaredite barges. He concludes by asking, “Who can tell what two centuries may do in the way of giving a historical position to this rising heresy?”

ID = [79638]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1851-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Mehr, Kahlile B. “Johan and Alma Lindlof: Early Saints in Russia.” Ensign, July 1981.
ID = [45448]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1981-07-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 9576  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:57:36
Roper, Matthew P. “John Bernhisel’s Gift to a Prophet: Incidents of Travel in Central America and the Book of Mormon.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 16 (2015): 207-253.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The claim that God revealed the details of Book of Mormon geography is not new, but the recent argument that there was a conspiracy while the Prophet was still alive to oppose a revealed geography is a novel innovation. A recent theory argues that the “Mesoamerican theory” or “limited Mesoamerican geography” originated in 1841 with Benjamin Winchester, an early Mormon missionary, writer, and dissident, who rejected the leadership of Brigham Young and the Twelve after 1844. This theory also claims that three unsigned editorials on Central America and the Book of Mormon published in the Times and Seasons on September 15 and October 1, 1842, were written by Benjamin Winchester, who successfully conspired with other dissidents to publish them against the will of the Prophet. Three articles address these claims. The first article addressed two questions: Did Joseph Smith, as some have claimed, know the details of and put forth a revealed Book of Mormon geography? Second, what is a Mesoamerican geography and does it constitute a believable motive for a proposed Winchester conspiracy? This second article provides additional historical background on the question of Joseph Smith’s thinking on the Book of Mormon by examining the influence of John L. Stephen’s 1841 work, Incidents of Travel in Central America, upon early Latter-day Saints, including Joseph Smith.

ID = [4233]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  bom,brigham,interpreter-journal  Size: 64721  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:44:56
Skousen, Royal. “John Gilbert’s 1892 Account of the 1830 Printing of the Book of Mormon.” In The Disciple as Witness: Essays on Latter-day Saint History and Doctrine in Honor of Richard Lloyd Anderson, edited by Ricks, Stephen D., Parry, Donald W., and Hedges, Andrew H. Provo, UT: The Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 2000.
ID = [81860]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2000-01-01  Collections:  bom,church-history,farms-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:04
Hamblin, William J. “John L. Sorenson and Martin H. Raish, Pre-Columbian Contact with the Americas across the Oceans: An Annotated Bibliography.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3, no. 1 (1991): 154-57.
ID = [80858]  Status = Type = bibliography  Date = 1991-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review,sorenson  Size: 9785  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:58:57
Silver, Cherry B. “John L. Sorenson and Melvin J. Thorne, eds., Rediscovering the Book of Mormon.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 4 (1992): Article 60.
Display Abstract  

Review of Rediscovering the Book of Mormon (1991), edited by John L. Sorenson and Melvin J. Thorne.

ID = [135]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 7643  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:17
Janetski, Joel C. “John L. Sorenson, The Geography of Book of Mormon Events: A Source Book.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3 (1991): Article 15.
Display Abstract  

Review of The Geography of the Book of Mormon Events: A Source Book (1990), by John L. Sorenson.

ID = [102]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1991-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 7476  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:17
Wirth, Diane E. “John L. Sorenson. Images of Ancient America: Visualizing Book of Mormon Life.” FARMS Review of Books 11, no. 1 (1999): Article 5.
Display Abstract  

Review of Images of Ancient America: Visualizing Book of Mormon Life (1998), by John L. Sorenson

ID = [317]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1999-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 18800  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:19
Gardner, Brant A., and Mark Alan Wright. “John L. Sorenson’s Complete Legacy: Reviewing Mormon’s Codex.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 14 (2015): 209-221.
Display Abstract  

Mormon’s Codex: An Ancient American Book is unquestionably a monument to an impressive career defending, defining, and explaining the Book of Mormon. John L. Sorenson has been for the New World setting of the Book of Mormon what Hugh Nibley was for the Old World setting. From his earliest 1952 publications using anthropology and geography to defend the Book of Mormon to the 2013 publication of Mormon’s Codex, Sorenson has been the dominant force in shaping scholarly discussions about the Book of Mormon in its New World setting. With an impressive 714 pages of text with footnotes, Mormon’s Codex is physically an appropriate capstone to his long publishing career.

ID = [4260]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 31060  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:44:56
Rees, Robert A. “John Milton, Joseph Smith, and the Book of Mormon.” BYU Studies Quarterly 54, no. 3 (2015): 6-18.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This comparison of Joseph Smith and John Milton focuses on their literary output and especially the preparation each had for dictating a long religious work, in Milton’s case Paradise Lost and in Smith’s the Book of Mormon. Most notable authors, including Milton, had a long apprenticeship that involved writing several “try works,” practice works that served as tutorials and stepping stones preparing their authors for their magnum opus. Joseph Smith had no such trial period for learning how to weave together intricate subplots, multitudes of characters, and historical background detail. Milton, in particular, had all the advantages of a first-rate English education. Smith, by contrast,had the most meager of educational opportunities. According to his wife, at the time he dictated the Book of Mormon, he “could neither write nor dictate a coherent and well-worded letter.” In spite of these disadvantages, Smith dictated most of the Book of Mormon over a period of less than three months, whereas Milton’s dictation of Paradise Lost took place over more than a decade. While it has been popular since 1830 for critics to debunk or diminish the Book of Mormon, it has stood the test of time in more ways than one.

Keywords: Authorship; Early Church History; John; Joseph; Jr.; Literature; Milton; Smith; Translation
ID = [10807]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-03  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,byu-studies  Size: 24286  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:00:17
Snow, Edgar C., Jr. “John W. Welch and Doris R. Dant, The Book of Mormon Paintings of Minerva Teichert.” FARMS Review of Books 10, no. 2 (1998): Article 6.
Display Abstract  

Review of The Book of Mormon Paintings of Minerva Teichert (1997), by John W. Welch and Doris R. Dant

ID = [303]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1998-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 11916  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:19
Welch, John W. John W. Welch Notes - Come Follow Me. Springville, UT: Book of Mormon Central, 2020.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

These Notes come from scripture classes taught in the Provo Utah Edgemont Stake by John W. Welch between 2006 and 2018. Those classes covered all four of the Standard Works in rotation, going through the Book of Mormon three different times. These Notes are incomplete, because some classes were not recorded, while recordings of several classes were low quality. These recordings were originally made available mainly as a service to class members who were away on missions or otherwise had to miss a class. The recordings have been transcribed, organized, and edited by generous volunteers, including Carol Jones, Rita Spencer, Spencer Kraus, Ruth Schmidt, and Jack and Jeannie Welch. The transcripts have been prepared for posting on the web by BMC staff members, including Jasmin Gimenez Rappleye, Nicole Shephard, Ryan Dahle, and Jared Riddick. These Notes are intended to be interesting and helpful, but by no means do they constitute a complete verse by verse commentary. Some of the comments here were built on previously published KnoWhys, FARMS books or Insights, and various other publications, many of which can now be found on the Book of Mormon Central Archive. Other comments turn attention to topics that are new and different or give exploratory answers to questions raised by students in this class. These recordings have been cleaned up, compiled, arranged, and edited, with the addition of subheadings, transitions, and references, in order to relate these Notes to lessons in the 2020 Come Follow Me curriculum, to materials integral to the Scriptures Plus app, and to resources available free in the Book of Mormon Central Archive.

Keywords: Come Follow Me, Commentary
ID = [75457]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2020-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,welch  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:20
Seely, David Rolph. “John W. Welch, ed., Reexploring the Book of Mormon: The F.A.R.M.S. Updates.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 5 (1993): Article 44.
Display Abstract  

Review of Reexploring the Book of Mormon: The F.A.R.M.S. Updates (1992), edited by John W. Welch

ID = [161]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1993-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 30225  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:18
Compton, Todd M. “John W. Welch, The Sermon at the Temple and the Sermon on the Mount.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3 (1991): Article 23.
Display Abstract  

Review of The Sermon at the Temple and the Sermon on the Mount (1990), by John W. Welch.

ID = [110]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1991-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 11174  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:17
Bell, James P. “John W. Welch: Taking the Stand.” This People 8-9 (February 1987): 48-50, 61, 63.
Display Abstract  

Features the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies (FARMS) and its founder, John W. Welch. One goal of FARMS is to better understand the ancient foundations and cultural background of the Book of Mormon, which will then strengthen an individual’s testimony of the book.

ID = [79639]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1987-02-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Interpreter Foundation. “John W. Welch’s Concluding Remarks at 2015 Exploring the Complexities in the English Language of the Book of Mormon.” The Interpreter Foundation website. September 27, 2015.
ID = [5140]  Status = Type = website article  Date = 2015-09-27  Collections:  bom,interpreter-website  Size: 568  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:45:03
Hinckley, Gordon B. “Joined Together in Love and Faith.” Delivered at the Saturday Morning Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1985.
ID = [15627]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 1985-10-01  Collections:  bom,general-conference  Size: 2178  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:05:11
Hinckley, Gordon B. “Joined Together in Love and Faith.” Ensign, November 1985.
ID = [47328]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1985-11-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 2163  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:57:53
Kraus, Spencer. “Jonathan Edwards’s Unique Role in an Imagined Church History.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 52 (2022): 65-102.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Review of Jonathan Neville, Infinite Goodness: Joseph Smith, Jonathan Edwards, and the Book of Mormon. Salt Lake City: Digital Legends Press, 2021. 339 pages. $22.99 (paperback).
Abstract: This is the second of two papers reviewing Jonathan Neville’s latest books on the translation of the Book of Mormon. In Infinite Goodness, Neville claims that Joseph Smith’s vocabulary and translation of the Book of Mormon were deeply influenced by the famous Protestant minister Jonathan Edwards. Neville cites various words or ideas that he believes originate with Edwards as the original source for the Book of Mormon’s language. However, most of Neville’s findings regarding Edwards and other non-biblical sources are superficial and weak, and many of his findings have a more plausible common source: the language used by the King James Bible. Neville attempts to make Joseph a literary prodigy, able to read and reformulate eight volumes of Edwards’s sermons — with enough genius to do so, but not enough genius to learn the words without Edwards’s help. This scenario contradicts the historical record, and Neville uses sources disingenuously to impose his idiosyncratic and wholly modern worldview onto Joseph Smith and his contemporaries.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; Jonathan Edwards; Joseph Smith; review
ID = [12556]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2022-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 83447  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:05:01
Madsen, Truman G. “José Smith—Disertación 1: La Primera Visión y sus consecuencias.” Devotional, Brigham Young University, August 22, 1978.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Al registrar los sentimientos que tuvo al salir de la Arboleda y en los días subsiguientes, José dejó registrada esta oración: “Mi alma se llenó de amor, y por muchos días pude regocijarme con gran gozo, y el Señor estaba conmigo, pero no pude encontrar a ninguno que creyera mi visión celestial”.

Keywords: Joseph Smith
ID = [68532]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 1978-08-22  Collections:  bom,byu-speeches  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:05:53
Mendenhall, Mark E., Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England, eds. Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
Display Abstract  

Joseph and Hyrum Smith exemplified leadership as they worked together in organizing and operating the Church, teaching, speaking, and building temples and towns. As leaders, they held firm to their convictions, roused the hearts and minds of men and women in varied walks of life, and left legacies sufficient to stamp them as two of the most remarkable and influential men of the nineteenth century. The stories and examples of their shared leadership illustrate how they honored agency, exerted righteous influence, grew through adversity, forged bonds of obligation and love, governed conflict, and organized through councils. Their examples in this book can help us transform our personal perspective of leadership, lead with an eternal focus, heal and bless others through our leadership, learn and grow by asking authentic questions, share leadership in the home, and lead in the governmental arena. By incorporating these principles in our lives, we can foster more satisfying relationships in our homes, our Church service, and our professional lives. The book concludes with a call for each of us to carry on their legacy, which transcends time and place. Their lives and teachings are filled with lessons and skills we can easily apply today. ISBN 978-0-8425-2754-5

ID = [33285]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size:   Children: 13  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:39

Articles

Mendenhall, Mark E., and J. Bonner Ritchie. “‘They Were of One Heart and One Mind’” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35370]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 34376  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
O’Driscoll, Jeffrey S., and Hal B. Gregersen. “‘Persuasion and Love Unfeigned’” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35371]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 42846  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
Derr, C. Brooklyn. “‘I Will Yet Make Him a Polished Shaft in My Quiver’” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35372]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 31841  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
Thompson, Michael. “‘Tuned to the Work’” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35373]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 34240  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
Thompson, Jeffrey Paul, and J. Stuart Bunderson. “‘Bound Together in the Cords of Everlasting Love’” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35374]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size: 29287  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
Romney, Alexander C. “In the Hands of the Potter.” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35375]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 28081  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
Mendenhall, Mark E., J. Bonner Ritchie, and Julie M. Hite. “‘For the Power Is in Them’” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35376]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 18196  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
England, Breck. “An Undeviating Course.” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35377]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 35225  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
Dollahite, David C., and E. Jeffrey Hill. “A House of God.” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35378]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 35588  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
Marshall, Elaine S. “The Power of God to Heal.” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35379]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 37126  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
Gregersen, Hal B., and Mark E. Mendenhall. “‘Let Him Ask of God’” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35380]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 36167  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
Marsh, W. Jeffrey. “A Prophet-Statesman.” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35381]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 49940  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
Swinton, Heidi S. “And the End Is Not Yet.” In Joseph & Hyrum, Leading as One, eds. Mark E. Mendenhall, Hal B. Gregersen, Jeffrey S. O’Driscoll, Heidi S. Swinton, and Breck England. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2010.
ID = [35382]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size: 35891  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:32
Madsen, Ann N., and Susan Easton Black. “Joseph and Joseph: ‘He Shall Be Like unto Me’ (2 Nephi 3:15).” In The Old Testament and the Latter-day Saints: The 14th Annual Sidney B. Sperry Symposium, 125–40. [Salt Lake City]: Randall Book, 1987.
ID = [67072]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1987-01-01  Collections:  bom,old-test,rsc-books,rsc-sperry  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:05:41
Baker, LeGrand L. Joseph and Moroni: The 7 Principles Moroni Taught Joseph Smith. Salt Lake City: Eborn Books, 2006.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This is the story of how an angel taught a boy to be a prophet. In it, we follow Joseph’s life from the time of the First Vision until he completed the translation and returned the Gold Plates to Moroni. It is the story of a remarkable friendship. Moroni had two responsibilities: first, to give Joseph the Gold Plates and teach him how to translate them and second to teach Joseph how to be a prophet.

Keywords: Early Church History, Moroni, Prophet, Smith, Joseph, Jr.
ID = [75428]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2006-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:20
Lindsay, Jeff. “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Map: Part 1 of 2.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 19 (2016): 153-239.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The Arabian Peninsula has provided a significant body of evidence related to the plausibility of Nephi’s account of the ancient journey made by Lehi’s family across Arabia. Relatively few critics have seriously considered the evidence, generally nitpicking at details and insisting that the evidences are insignificant. Recently more meaningful responses have been offered by well educated writers showing familiarity with the Arabian evidences and the Book of Mormon. They argue that Nephi’s account is not historical and any apparent evidence in its favor can be attributed to weak LDS apologetics coupled with Joseph’s use of modern sources such as a detailed map of Arabia that could provide the name Nahom, for example. Further, the entire body of Arabian evidence for the Book of Mormon is said to be irrelevant because Nephi’s subtle and pervasive incorporation of Exodus themes in his account proves the Book of Mormon is fiction. On this point we are to trust modern Bible scholarship (“Higher Criticism”) which allegedly shows that the book of Exodus wasn’t written until long after Nephi’s day and, in fact, tells a story that is mere pious fiction, fabricated during or after the Exile.
There were high-end European maps in Joseph’s day that did show a place name related to Nahom. Efforts to locate these maps anywhere near Joseph Smith have thus far proved unsuccessful. But the greater failure is in the explanatory power of any theory that posits Joseph used such a map. Such theories do not account for the vast majority of impressive evidences for the plausibility of Nephi’s account of the journey through Arabia (e.g., remarkable candidates for Bountiful and the River Laman, the plausibility of the eastward turn after Nahom). They do not explain why one obscure name among hundreds was plagiarized — a name that would have the good fortune of later being verified as a genuine ancient tribal name present in the right region in Lehi’s day. More importantly, theories of fabrication based on modern maps ignore the fact that Joseph and his peers never took advantage of the impressive Book of Mormon evidence that was waiting to be discovered on such maps. That discovery would not come until 1978, and it has led to many remarkable finds through modern field work since then. Through ever better maps, exploration, archaeological work, and other scholarly work, our knowledge of the Arabian Peninsula has grown dramatically from Joseph’s day. Through all of this, not one detail in the account of Lehi’s Trail has been invalidated, though questions remain and much further work needs to be done. Importantly, aspects that were long ridiculed have become evidences for the Book of Mormon. There is a trend here that demands respect, and no mere map from Joseph’s day or even ours can account for this.
As for the Exodus-based attack, yes, many modern scholars deny that the Exodus ever happened and believe the story was fabricated as pious fiction well after 600 bc. But this conclusion does not represent a true consensus and is not free from bias and blindness. The Exodus-based attack on the Book of Mormon ultimately is a case where a weakness in biblical evidence from Egypt is used to challenge the strength of Book of Mormon evidence from Egypt’s neighbor to the east, the Arabian Peninsula. We will see that there are good reasons for the absence of evidence from Egypt, and yet abundant evidence that the Exodus material interwoven in Nephi’s account could have been found on the brass plates by 600 bc. The absence of archaeological evidence for Israel’s exodus from Egypt and the chaos in the many schools of modern biblical scholarship do not trump hard archaeological, geographical, and other evidence from the Arabian Peninsula regarding Lehi’s exodus.
We will see that some of the most significant strengths of the Book of Mormon have not been turned into weaknesses. Indeed, the evidence from Arabia continues to grow and demands consideration from those willing to maintain an open mind and exercise a particle of faith.

ID = [3764]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 64638  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:43
Lindsay, Jeff. “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Map: Part 2 of 2.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 19 (2016): 247-326.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The Arabian Peninsula has provided a significant body of evidence related to the plausibility of Nephi’s account of the ancient journey made by Lehi’s family across Arabia. Relatively few critics have seriously considered the evidence, generally nitpicking at details and insisting that the evidences are insignificant. Recently more meaningful responses have been offered by well educated writers showing familiarity with the Arabian evidences and the Book of Mormon. They argue that Nephi’s account is not historical and any apparent evidence in its favor can be attributed to weak LDS apologetics coupled with Joseph’s use of modern sources such as a detailed map of Arabia that could provide the name Nahom, for example. Further, the entire body of Arabian evidence for the Book of Mormon is said to be irrelevant because Nephi’s subtle and pervasive incorporation of Exodus themes in his account proves the Book of Mormon is fiction. On this point we are to trust modern Bible scholarship (“Higher Criticism”) which allegedly shows that the book of Exodus wasn’t written until long after Nephi’s day and, in fact, tells a story that is mere pious fiction, fabricated during or after the Exile.
There were high-end European maps in Joseph’s day that did show a place name related to Nahom. Efforts to locate these maps anywhere near Joseph Smith have thus far proved unsuccessful. But the greater failure is in the explanatory power of any theory that posits Joseph used such a map. Such theories do not account for the vast majority of impressive evidences for the plausibility of Nephi’s account of the journey through Arabia (e.g., remarkable candidates for Bountiful and the River Laman, the plausibility of the eastward turn after Nahom). They do not explain why one obscure name among hundreds was plagiarized — a name that would have the good fortune of later being verified as a genuine ancient tribal name present in the right region in Lehi’s day. More importantly, theories of fabrication [Page 248]based on modern maps ignore the fact that Joseph and his peers never took advantage of the impressive Book of Mormon evidence that was waiting to be discovered on such maps. That discovery would not come until 1978, and it has led to many remarkable finds through modern field work since then. Through ever better maps, exploration, archaeological work, and other scholarly work, our knowledge of the Arabian Peninsula has grown dramatically from Joseph’s day. Through all of this, not one detail in the account of Lehi’s Trail has been invalidated, though questions remain and much further work needs to be done. Importantly, aspects that were long ridiculed have become evidences for the Book of Mormon. There is a trend here that demands respect, and no mere map from Joseph’s day or even ours can account for this.
As for the Exodus-based attack, yes, many modern scholars deny that the Exodus ever happened and believe the story was fabricated as pious fiction well after 600 bc. But this conclusion does not represent a true consensus and is not free from bias and blindness. The Exodus-based attack on the Book of Mormon ultimately is a case where a weakness in biblical evidence from Egypt is used to challenge the strength of Book of Mormon evidence from Egypt’s neighbor to the east, the Arabian Peninsula. We will see that there are good reasons for the absence of evidence from Egypt, and yet abundant evidence that the Exodus material interwoven in Nephi’s account could have been found on the brass plates by 600 bc. The absence of archaeological evidence for Israel’s exodus from Egypt and the chaos in the many schools of modern biblical scholarship do not trump hard archaeological, geographical, and other evidence from the Arabian Peninsula regarding Lehi’s exodus.
We will see that some of the most significant strengths of the Book of Mormon have not been turned into weaknesses. Indeed, the evidence from Arabia continues to grow and demands consideration from those willing to maintain an open mind and exercise a particle of faith.

ID = [3766]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 64609  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:43
Fraser, Gordon H. Joseph and the Golden Plates: A Close Look at the Book of Mormon. Eugene, OR: Industrial Litho, 1978.
Display Abstract  

A revised version of Fraser’s 1964 work, What Does the Book of Mormon Teach?

ID = [77928]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1978-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Parry, Donald W. “Joseph Fielding McConkie and Robert L. Millet, Doctrinal Commentary on the Book of Mormon. Vol. 3, Alma through Helaman.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 4 (1992): Article 54.
Display Abstract  

Review of Doctrinal Commentary on the Book of Mormon, vol. 3, Alma through Helaman (1991), by Joseph Fielding McConkie and Robert L. Millet.

ID = [129]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 19279  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:17
Allen, J. Michael. “Joseph Fielding McConkie and Robert L. Millet, Doctrinal Commentary on the Book of Mormon. Vol. 3, Alma through Helaman.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 4 (1992): Article 55.
Display Abstract  

Review of Doctrinal Commentary on the Book of Mormon, vol. 3, Alma through Helaman (1991), by Joseph Fielding McConkie and Robert L. Millet.

ID = [130]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 17962  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:17
Matthews, Darrell L. “Joseph Fielding McConkie, Robert L. Millet, and Brent L. Top. Doctrinal Commentary on the Book of Mormon. Vol. 4, 3 Nephi through Moroni.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 5 (1993): Article 34.
Display Abstract  

Review of Doctrinal Commentary on the Book of Mormon, vol. 4, Third Nephi through Moroni (1992), by Joseph Fielding McConkie, Robert L. Millet, and Brent L. Top

ID = [151]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1993-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 16546  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:18
Preece, Michael J. “Joseph L. Allen, Exploring the Lands of the Book of Mormon.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 3 (1991): Article 3.
Display Abstract  

Review of Exploring the Lands of the Book of Mormon (1989), by Joseph L. Allen.

ID = [90]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1991-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 49822  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:17
Welch, Rosalynde Frandsen. “Joseph M. Spencer, An Other Testament: On Typology.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 24, no. 1 (2015).
ID = [3329]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size: 25816  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:40
Ferguson, Thomas Stuart. “Joseph Smith and American Archaeology.” Bulletin of the UASN 4 (March 1953): 19-25.
Display Abstract  

Shows “striking agreements between the Book of Mormon history and the independent findings of modern archaeological-historical research”

ID = [79640]  Status = Type = newsletter article  Date = 1953-03-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Baugh, Alexander L., Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin C. Pykles, eds. Joseph Smith and His First Vision: Context, Place, and Meaning. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
Display Abstract  

This volume celebrates the bicentennial of Joseph Smith’s 1820 First Vision of the Father and the Son, a founding event in the restoration of the Church of Jesus Christ. Contributors examine the various accounts of the vision, the religious excitement prevalent in the region, the question that prompted Joseph to enter the grove, the powers of darkness that assailed him, and the natural environment and ultimate preservation of the Sacred Grove. This volume brings together some of the finest presentations from a 2020 BYU Church History Symposium honoring the bicentennial of the First Vision. ISBN 978-1-9503-0408-0

ID = [33169]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size:   Children: 14  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:38

Articles

Oaks, Dallin H. “Writing about the Prophet Joseph Smith.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33916]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Dew, Sheri L. “Joseph Smith and the Problem of Loneliness.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33917]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Bushman, Richard Lyman. “The First Vision in 2020.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33918]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Cope, Rachel. “The First Vision within the Context of Revivalism.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33919]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Bennett, Richard E. “Quiet Revivalism: New Light on the Burned-Over District.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33920]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Staker, Mark Lyman, and Donald L. Enders. “Excitement on the Subject of Religion: Controversy within Palmyra’s 1819 and 1820 Preaching District.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33921]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Barney, Quinten Zehn. “A Contextual Background for Joseph Smith’s Last Known Recounting of the First Vision.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33922]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Godfrey, Matthew C. “The ‘Nature’ of Revelation: The Influence of the Natural Environment on Joseph Smith’s Revelatory Experiences.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33923]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Boatright, Gary L., Jr. “The Sacred Grove: Its History, Preservation, and Regeneration.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33924]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Hepworth, Steven. “‘I Was Seized Upon by Some Power’: Joseph Smith, Satan, and the First Vision.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33925]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Jackson, Kent P. “‘O Lord, What Church Shall I Join?’: The Question and the Answer.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33926]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Olsen, Steven L. “Literary Craftsmanship of the Joseph Smith Story.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33927]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Tait, Lisa Olsen. “Susa Young Gates’s ‘Vision Beautiful’” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33928]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Griffiths, Casey Paul. “The First Vision Goes to the Movies.” In Joseph Smith and His First Vision, eds. Alexander L. Baugh, Steven C. Harper, Brent M. Rogers, and Benjamin Pykles. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2021.
ID = [33929]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Beardsley, Harry Markle. Joseph Smith and His Mormon Empire. Boston: Houghton Mifflin and Riverside, 1931.
Display Abstract  

A historical polemical work against Mormonism. Chapter 8 discusses various alleged anachronisms and absurdities in the Book of Mormon. The author rejects the Spaulding Theory in favor of the psychological environmentalist explanation proposed by Woodbridge Riley for the origin of the Book of Mormon.

ID = [77929]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1931-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Barker, Margaret. “Joseph Smith and Preexilic Israelite Religion.” BYU Studies Quarterly 44, no. 4 (2006): 69-82.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Terryl Givens has set Joseph Smith in the religious and cultural context of his time and raised many important issues. I should like to take a few of these issues and set them in another context, that of preexilic Jerusalem. I am not a scholar of Mormon texts and traditions. I am a biblical scholar specializing in the Old Testament, and until some Mormon scholars made contact with me a few years ago, I would never have considered using Mormon texts and traditions as part of my work. Since that initial contact I have had many good and fruitful exchanges and have begun to look at these texts very closely. I am still, however, very much an amateur in this area. What I offer can only be the reactions of an Old Testament scholar: are the revelations to Joseph Smith consistent with the situation in Jerusalem in about 600 BCE? Do the revelations to Joseph Smith fit in that context, the reign of King Zedekiah, who is mentioned at the beginning of the First Book of Nephi, which begins in the “first year of the reign of Zedekiah” (1 Nephi 1:4)? Zedekiah was installed as king in Jerusalem in 597 BCE.

Keywords: 1 Nephi; Jerusalem; King Zedekiah; Old Testament; Preexilic
ID = [4676]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2006-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,moses  Size: 30998  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:44:59
Calabro, David M. “Joseph Smith and the Architecture of Genesis.” In The Temple: Ancient and Restored. Proceedings of the 2014 Temple on Mount Zion Symposium, edited by Stephen D. Ricks and Donald W. Parry. The Temple on Mount Zion Series. Volume 3. 165–181. Orem and Salt Lake City, UT: The Interpreter Foundation and Eborn Books, 2016.
Display Abstract  

During his lifetime, Joseph Smith revealed at least four versions of what I will refer to as the “Genesis account,” which consists of the creation of the world, the experiences of Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden, and the events that befell them and their near posterity following the expulsion from the garden. These four versions each differ in important ways from the biblical text in Genesis, and they also differ one from another. The versions of the Genesis account include the following:

(1) scattered references found in the Book of Mormon;
(2) the biblical account as revised in the Book of Moses;
(3) the account in the Book of Abraham; and
(4) the version presented in the temple endowment.

I will focus on the second of these, the Book of Moses, especially chapters 1-7, which were revealed to Joseph Smith from June to December 1830. Many have already pointed out temple-related themes that abound in these chapters.

I will take these discoveries a step further, arguing that Moses 1-7 is fundamentally a ritual text whose elements are adapted to the physical features of the temple of Solomon. I will then discuss how this reading of the Book of Moses might interact with modern scholarship on the biblical book of Genesis, and finally how this reading of Moses can provide insight into ritual performances both ancient and modern

ID = [2591]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  abraham,bom,moses,old-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:35
Lund, Herbert Z. “Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon.” The Latter-day Saints’ Millennial Star 95, no. 42 (26 October 1933): 689-95.
Display Abstract  

Argues against statements that Joseph Smith produced the Book of Mormon by way of “visionary seizures” The testimony of the Three Witnesses is reprinted, as is a description of David Whitmer’s testimony before he died.

ID = [81424]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1933-10-26  Collections:  bom,millennial-star  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:01
Smith, George D., Jr. “Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon.” Free Inquiry 4 (Winter 1983): 21-31.
Display Abstract  

Asserts that the Book of Mormon appealed to people of Joseph Smith’s day because it reflected popular ideas of the time, and that it is merely a product of 19th-century concepts and events such as anti-Masonry, revivalism, and magical practices. Author also holds that the Book of Mormon uses biblical material anachronistically and borrows from concepts regarding the Hebrew origin of the Indians.

ID = [79641]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1983-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Smith, George D., Jr. “Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon.” Free Inquiry 4, no. 1 (winter 1983): 21-31.
ID = [77252]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1983-11-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:33
Smith, George D., Jr. “Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon.” In On the Barricades: Religion and Free Inquiry in Conflict, edited by Robert Basil, Mary Beth Gehrman, and Tim Madigan, 137-56. Buffalo: Prometheus Books, 1989.
ID = [77229]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1989-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:33
Faust, James E. “Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon.” Ensign, January 1996.
ID = [52265]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1996-01-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 17510  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:01:07
Hall, Manly Palmer. “Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon—A Survey and an Appraisal.” Long Beach, CA: n.p., 1953.
Display Abstract  

Compares Joseph Smith to Mohammed. Notes that the anthropological data in the Book of Mormon does not likely reflect Jacksonian America. Discusses the characters from the plates and Joseph Smith’s supposed authorship. “I think the fact remains that the Book of Mormon is more or less difficult to explain because it has remarkable internal homogeneity”

ID = [77930]  Status = Type = manuscript  Date = 1953-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Parry, Keith. “Joseph Smith and the Clash of Sacred Cultures.” Dialogue 18 (Winter 1985): 65-78.
Display Abstract  

Deals with early Mormon missionary experiences among the American Indians. These experiences provide a great deal of insight into Mormon-Indian relationships both past and present. Shows the impact that the Book of Mormon has had upon those relationships.

ID = [79642]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1985-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Thompson, A. Keith. “Joseph Smith and the Doctrine of Sealing.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 21 (2016): 1-21.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Brian Hales has observed that we cannot understand Joseph Smith’s marriage practices in Nauvoo without understanding the related theology. However, he implies that we are hampered in coming to a complete understanding of that theology because the only primary evidence we have of that theology is the revelation now recorded as Section 132 of the Doctrine and Covenants and a few entries in William Clayton’s journal. This paper argues that we have more primary evidence about Joseph Smith’s sealing theology than we realize. The accounts we have of the First Vision and of Moroni’s first visits in 1823 have references to the sealing power embedded in them, ready for Joseph to unpack when he was spiritually educated enough to ask the right questions.

ID = [3732]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,d-c,interpreter-journal,old-test  Size: 52254  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:43
Lund, John Lewis. Joseph Smith and the Geography of the Book of Mormon. Orem, Utah: The Communications Company, 2012.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Joseph Smith and the Geography of the Book of Mormon begins by establishing Joseph Smith’s actual and verifiable words, which were subject to his review and correction during his lifetime, as a “Supreme Source” for the geography of the Book of Mormon. First- and second-hand accounts of what the Prophet Joseph said are referred to as “lesser sources.” Most of the confusion about the geography of the Book of Mormon results from lesser sources. One of the most undervalued and supreme sources of Joseph Smith’s teachings was an early church newspaper in Nauvoo, Illinois titled the Times and Seasons. By a “thus saith the Lord” revelation, Joseph assumed the editorship of the Times and Seasons from March of 1842 to October of 1842. Several editorials dictated and approved of by Joseph identified Zarahemla being in the Guatemala of 1842 and the “small or narrow” neck of land being in Central America. Once either Zarahemla or the narrow neck of land have been discovered, one has found the axis mundi of the primary American events of the Book of Mormon. A comprehensive Author Identification Study confirmed the Prophet Joseph’s authorship of the Times and Seasons articles in question. The details and methodology of the Author Identification Study are reported on in this book. Also the reasons why one should accept Joseph Smith’s words above other sources and his whereabouts during the editions of the Times and Seasons editorials in question. Other interesting findings about volcanoes, the Law of Moses and the calendars, and how the Gold Plates arrived in Palmyra, New York are found with the pages of this book. [Publisher]

Keywords: Smith, Joseph, Jr.; Publications (Mormon), Times and Seasons; Book of Mormon; Law of Moses; Historic archaeology, Book of Mormon; Book of Mormon, historicity
ID = [81490]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2012-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:02
Caudle, Kirk L. “Joseph Smith and the Gift of Translation: The Development of Discourse About Spiritual Gifts During the Early Book of Mormon Translation Process (1828-1829).” International Journal of Mormon Studies 6 (2013): 109-131.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

“Although Mormons currently understand spiritual gifts to be inseparably connected with the gift of the Holy Ghost that is not how Joseph Smith apparently understood them before his baptism. … This essay focuses on the earliest ideas of concept of spiritual gifts as contained in the earliest revelations and translations of Joseph Smith from July 1828 through May 1829.”

Keywords: Smith, Joseph, Jr., spiritual gifts; Seer stones; Doctrine and Covenants, editions and translations; Doctrinal history, Holy Ghost; Spiritual gifts and experiences; Book of Mormon, Joseph Smith’s translation of
ID = [82059]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2013-01-01  Collections:  bom,d-c  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:06
Jackson, Kent P. “Joseph Smith and the Historicity of the Book of Mormon.” In Historicity and the Latter-day Saint Scriptures, ed. Paul Y. Hoskisson, 123–40. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2001.
ID = [36388]  Status = Type = book chapter  Date = 2001-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size: 40991  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:41
Merrill, Byron R. “Joseph Smith and the Lamanites.” In Joseph Smith: The Prophet, The Man, ed. Susan Easton Black and Charles D. Tate Jr., 187–202. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 1993.
ID = [36768]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1993-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size: 30172  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:43
Stoffel, Jerome. “Joseph Smith and the Mormon Dilemma.” N.p., 1970-71.
Display Abstract  

A self-published history of Joseph Smith and the restoration of the Church, the coming forth of scriptural records, and the exodus of the Saints to Utah. Two chapters feature the coming forth of the Book of Mormon and the internal character of the work. Author does not accept the Book of Mormon as scripture.

ID = [77931]  Status = Type = manuscript  Date = 1970-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Persuitte, David. Joseph Smith and the Origin of the Book of Mormon. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1985.
ID = [77204]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1985-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:32
Persuitte, David. Joseph Smith and the Origins of the Book of Mormon. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 1985.
Display Abstract  

Examine the motives and means by which Joseph Smith authored the Book of Mormon. Contains an extensive comparison between Ethan Smith’s View of the Hebrews

ID = [77932]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1985-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Wittorf, John H., ed. “Joseph Smith and the Prehistoric Mound-Builders of Eastern North America.” Society for Early Historic Archaeology Newsletter 123 (October 1970): 1-9.
Display Abstract  

Shows that Joseph Smith never made a conclusive statement supporting the belief that mounds and the mound builders of Northeastern America represent the remains of Book of Mormon lands or peoples. Discusses the Enon mound, Zelph mound, Adena and Hopwell cultures, and the Kinderhook plates.

ID = [79643]  Status = Type = newsletter article  Date = 1970-10-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Roper, Matthew P. “Joseph Smith and the Question of Book of Mormon Geography.” Paper presented at the 2010 FairMormon Conference Conference. August, 2010.
ID = [32470]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 2010-08-01  Collections:  bom,fair-conference  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:36
Durham, Reed C., Jr. “Joseph Smith and the Restoration.” Brigham Young University Studies 8, no. 3 (1968): 342.
ID = [9782]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1968-01-02  Collections:  bom,byu-studies  Size: 1173  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:00:09
Barrett, Ivan J. Joseph Smith and the Restoration: A History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to 1846. 2d ed. Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 1973.
Display Abstract  

Chapter 4, “Glad Tidings from Cumorah,” tells of Moroni’s visit and Joseph Smith’s first visit to the Hill Cumorah. Chapter 5, “Delivery and Translation of the Ancient Record” and Chapter 6, “Publication of the Book of Mormon,” deal specifically with the Book of Mormon. This work is reviewed in D.144.

ID = [77933]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1973-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Matthews, Robert J. “Joseph Smith and the Text of the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 15, no. 1 (2006): 38-42, 71.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Royal Skousen’s most significant contribution to Book of Mormon scholarship, this paper states, is in openly and systematically detailing the thousands of variants that occur across two manuscripts and twenty editions and showing that these variations do not affect the message or validity of the book as a witness of Jesus Christ. Skousen’s work also offers new insights into the process of translating and publishing the Book of Mormon. Though the work of translation appears to have involved a number of different methods, we can nevertheless be sure that the Book of Mormon was translated by the “gift and power of God.”

Keywords: Authorship; Critical Text; Joseph; Jr.; Smith; Translation
ID = [3181]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2006-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 26614  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
McDermott, Don J. “Joseph Smith and the Treasure of Hiram Abiff.” The Cryptic Scholar (Winter/Spring 1991): 40-50.
Display Abstract  

The link between Joseph Smith and the Masons is equivocal. At the time of Joseph Smith’s death, it was thought that Masonry was a threat to free government and the Book of Mormon revealed Masonic secrets. The accounts of the brother of Jared, Lehi, and others contain Masonic elements.

ID = [79644]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1991-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Madsen, Ann N. “Joseph Smith and the Words of Isaiah.” In Isaiah in the Book of Mormon, ed. Donald W. Parry and John W. Welch, 353—67. Salt Lake City/Provo, UT: Deseret Book and Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1998.
ID = [67053]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1998-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-books,old-test  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:05:41
Hales, Brian C. “Joseph Smith as a Book of Mormon Storyteller.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 46 (2021): 253-290.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: For nearly 200 years, skeptics have promoted different naturalistic explanations to describe how Joseph Smith generated all the words of the Book of Mormon. The more popular theories include plagiarism (e.g. of the Solomon Spaulding manuscript), collaboration (with Oliver Cowdery, Sidney Rigdon, etc.), mental illness (bipolar, dissociative, or narcissistic personality disorders) and automatic writing, also called “spirit writing, “trance writing,” or “channeling.” A fifth and currently the most popular theory posits that Joseph Smith possessed all the intellectual abilities needed to complete the task. A variation on this last explanation proposes that he used the methods of professional storytellers. For millennia, bards and minstrels have entertained their audiences with tales that extended over many hours and over several days. This article explores their techniques to assess whether Joseph Smith might have adopted such methodologies during the three-month dictation of the Book of Mormon. Through extensive fieldwork and research, the secrets of the Serbo-Croatian storytellers’ abilities to dictate polished stories in real time have been identified. Their technique, also found with modification among bards throughout the world, involves the memorization of formulaic language organized into formula systems in order to minimize the number of mental choices the tale-teller must make while wordsmithing each phrase. These formulas are evident in the meter, syntax, or lexical combinations employed in the storyteller’s sentences. Professional bards train for many years to learn the patterns and commit them to memory. When compared to Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon, the historical record fails to support that he had trained in the use of formula systems prior to 1829 or that his dictation employed a rhythmic delivery of the phrases. Neither are formula patterns detected in the printed 1830 Book of Mormon. Apparently, Smith did not adopt this traditional storyteller’s methodology to dictate the Book of Mormon.

ID = [3392]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 64768  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:40
Mercer, Samuel A. B. “Joseph Smith as an Interpreter and Translator of Egyptian.” Utah Survey 1 (September 1913): 4-36.
Display Abstract  

A defense of F. S. Spaulding’s pamphlet Joseph Smith Jr., As a Translator that shows that Joseph Smith was either self-deceived or an impostor. Compares the facsimiles in Abraham and the characters of the Anthon transcript and asserts that the Book of Abraham and the Book of Mormon were written in the same Egyptian and therefore the Book of Mormon may be judged on the same basis as the Book of Abraham. The facsimiles have been proven to be falsely translated—thus the Book of Mormon also must surely be a false translation or a product of Joseph Smith.

ID = [79645]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1913-09-01  Collections:  abraham,bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Fleming, Stephen J. “Joseph Smith as the Philosopher-King: Neoplatonism in Early Mormon Political Thought.” Journal of Mormon History 38, no. 3 (Summer, 2012): 102-127.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

The article describes the political views of early Mormons, particularly religious leader Joseph Smith, Jr., as Neoplatonic, fitting the notion of a philosopher-king derived from the philosopher Plato. Topics include the practice of theurgy, which involved ritual union with the divine, among ancient Greek philosophers, political notions in the Book of Mormon, and Neoplatonism among the Christian Church Fathers. Also noted connections between the Radical Reformation and Mormonism, the performance of theurgical magic rites by Joseph Smith, and Smith’s views on U.S. political life.

Keywords: Smith, Joseph, Jr., political activities; Assimilation; Smith, Joseph, Jr.; Book of Mormon, use and influence; Smith, Joseph, Jr., political thought; Ritualization
ID = [82029]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2012-06-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:06
Homans, James Edward [Webb, Robert C., pseud.]. Joseph Smith as Translator, A Candid Examination of His Claims to Have Translated the Book of Mormon. Salt Lake City: Deseret News Press, 1936.
Display Abstract  

A non-Mormon writing under the pseudonym of Robert C. Webb discusses issues relate

ID = [77934]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1936-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Wood, Wilford C., ed. Joseph Smith Begins His Work. Salt Lake City: Deseret News Press, 1958.
Display Abstract  

An official reproduction of the first edition of the Book of Mormon, printed from the first uncut sheets of the 1830 edition of the Book of Mormon.

ID = [77935]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1958-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Perkins, Leeman. “Joseph Smith et la Verite?” L’Etoile (October 1955): 180-86, 191-92.
Display Abstract  

Discusses (in French) the history of Joseph Smith and his subsequent followers and persecutions. The testimony of Martin Harris and the experience with Charles Anthon and the Book of Mormon are credits to Joseph Smith.

ID = [79646]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1955-10-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Faves, Louis. Joseph Smith et les Mormons. Lausanne: Delafontaine et Comp., 1854.
Display Abstract  

Discusses the establishment of the LDS church, the coming forth of the Book of Mormon, the Spaulding manuscript, and points out the biblical passages extant in the Book of Mormon.

ID = [77936]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1854-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
E., F. Joseph Smith in His Own Defense. Lamoni, Iowa: Herald Publishing House,n.d.
Display Abstract  

Written at least lifteen years after the death of Joseph Smith, but in the lirst person to express Joseph Smith’s views as understood by the author. Quotes Jacob 2 to condemn polygamy and repudiates the idea of celestial marriage.

ID = [77937]  Status = Type = book  Date = 0000-00-00  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Price, Robert M. “Joseph Smith in the Book of Mormon.” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 36, no. 4 (Winter, 2003): 89-96.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

DID JOSEPH SMITH WRITE the Book of Mormon? To this over-familiar question the orthodox Latter-day Saint answer is a resounding “No” because the official belief is that a series of men with quasi-biblical names wrote the book over many centuries.

Keywords: Book of Mormon, Smith, Joseph
ID = [81980]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2003-12-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
, ed. Joseph Smith in Vermont and New York. Provo, UT: BYU Studies, 2012.
Display Abstract  

This compilation of groundbreaking articles about Joseph Smith is selected from over fifty years of LDS scholarship published by BYU Studies. This volume features articles on young Joseph Smith’s leg surgery, the historical setting and early accounts of the First Vision, friends’ and family members’ recollections of Joseph’s early religious experiences, Joseph’s 1826 trial, and more. Contents “Joseph Smith’s Boyhood Operation: An 1813 Surgical Success” LeRoy S. Wirthlin “Awakenings in the Burned-over District: New Light on the Historical Setting of the First Vision” Milton V. Backman Jr. “The Earliest Documented Accounts of Joseph Smith’s First Vision” Dean C. Jessee “Katharine Smith Salisbury’s Recollections of Joseph’s Meetings with Moroni” Kyle R. Walker “The Colesville Branch and the Coming Forth of the Book of Mormon” Larry C. Porter “Joseph Knight’s Recollection of Early Mormon History” Dean C. Jessee “Joseph Smith and the Manchester (New York) Library” Robert Paul “Money-Digging Folklore and the Beginnings of Mormonism: An Interpretive Suggestion” Marvin S. Hill “Joseph Smith’s 1826 Trial: The Legal Setting” Gordon A. Madsen

ID = [75288]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2012-01-01  Collections:  bom,byu-studies,church-history  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:19
Jessee, Dean C. “Joseph Smith Jr.— in His Own Words, Part 1.” Ensign, December 1984.
ID = [46915]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1984-12-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 26060  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:57:49
Adams, George J. “Joseph Smith Jr.’s Rare Reprints.” Burlington, WI: n.p., 1991.
Display Abstract  

A copy of a “Lecture on the authenticity and scriptural character of the Book of Mormon,” written by George J. Adams in 1844. Confirms that the Book of Mormon is not the only scripture accepted by the Church, the Mormons also believe the Bible “as far as it has been translated correctly”

ID = [77938]  Status = Type = manuscript  Date = 1991-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Ensign. “Joseph Smith Letter on Virtue Obtained.” Ensign September 1985.
ID = [47276]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1985-09-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 2178  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:57:52
Allen, James B. “Joseph Smith Papers, Revelations and Translations, Volume 3: Printer’s Manuscript of the Book of Mormon.” BYU Studies Quarterly 59, no. 2 (2020): 311.
ID = [10402]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2020-01-02  Collections:  bom,byu-studies  Size: 14968  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:00:14
Skousen, Royal, and Robin Scott Jensen. The Joseph Smith Papers: Revelations and Translations, Volume 3, Printer’s Manuscript of the Book of Mormon. Salt Lake City, UT: The Church Historian’s Press, 2016.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

[2016 Mormon Historical Association Winner for Best Documentary Editing] “Volume 3 of the Revelations and Translations series, published in 2015, presents the most complete early text of the Book of Mormon—the printer’s manuscript.” [Publisher]

Keywords: Smith, Joseph, Jr., prophecies; Smith, Joseph, Jr., historiography; Award Winner; Smith, Joseph, Jr.; Smith, Joseph, Jr., record keeping; Smith, Joseph, Jr., sources; Joseph Smith Papers Project; Smith, Joseph, Jr., history; Smith, Joseph, Jr., writings
ID = [81513]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:02
Frater, Alan S. Joseph Smith Prophet of God; A Reply to Dr. Rumble. Rozelle, Australia: Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints,n.d.
Display Abstract  

An apologetic work replying to Dr. Rumble’s criticisms of Mormonism in The Mormons or Latter-Day Saints.

ID = [77939]  Status = Type = book  Date = 0000-00-00  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Carmack, Stanford A. “Joseph Smith Read the Words.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 18 (2016): 41-64.
Display Abstract  

2 Nephi 27:20, 22, 24
wherefore thou shalt read the words which I shall give unto thee. . .Wherefore when thou hast read the words which I have commanded thee . . .the Lord shall say unto him that shall read the words that shall be delivered him.

ID = [4400]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 1962  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:44:57
Smith, Joseph, Jr. Joseph Smith Tells His Own Story. Independence, MO: Price Publishing, 1985.
Display Abstract  

A reprint of articles from the Times and Seasons

ID = [77940]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1985-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Haight, David B. “Joseph Smith the Prophet.” Delivered at the Saturday Afternoon Session of the General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, October 1979.
ID = [14300]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 1979-10-01  Collections:  bom,general-conference  Size: 10569  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:05:08
Haight, David B. “Joseph Smith the Prophet.” Ensign, November 1979.
ID = [44707]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1979-11-01  Collections:  bom,ensign  Size: 12007  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:58:06
Ludlow, Jared W. “The Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible: Ancient Material Restored or Inspired Commentary? Canonical or Optional? Finished or Unfinished?” BYU Studies Quarterly 60, no. 3 (2021): 147–57.
Display Abstract  

Joseph Smith began an ambitious program to revise the biblical text in June 1830, not long after the organization of the Church of Christ and the publication of the Book of Mormon. While the result came to be known as the Joseph Smith Translation (JST), it was not a literal word-for-word translation of ancient biblical languages from a manuscript but more of an inspired revision or paraphrase based on the King James Version in English, carried out primarily between June 1830 and July 1833.1 Since Joseph Smith never specifically addressed how or exactly why he made the particular changes he did, it is an open question whether he felt he was restoring ancient material, making inspired commentary, modernizing the language, a combination of things, or something else.2 Another open question related to this project is its status among Latter-day Saint scripture. Is the entire JST considered canonical or not? Perhaps a further open question is whether the JST project was ever finished. This paper will address these issues by giving an overview of statements and approaches toward the JST.

ID = [4604]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,moses  Size: 30648  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:44:58
Nyman, Monte S., and Robert L. Millet, eds. The Joseph Smith Translation: The Restoration of Plain and Precious Things. Religious Studies Center Monograph Series 12. Provo, UT: BYU Religious Studies Center, 1985.
Display Abstract  

Ten prominent Church scholars presented at the symposium on the Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible. Their in-depth study of the Joseph Smith Translation and related scriptures clarifies the Bible from Genesis to Revelation and show how Joseph Smith restored many plain and precious truths to that holy book. This volume brings together those addresses, illuminating this inspired translation as perhaps no other book had done.

ID = [2512]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1985-01-01  Collections:  bom,moses,rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:35
“Joseph Smith Versus the Book of Mormon.” Utah Christian Tract Society 12 (May-June 1980): 2.
Display Abstract  

Claims that Joseph Smith’s teachings regarding the Godhead contradict the teachings of the Book of Mormon of one god.

ID = [79647]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1980-05-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
McKeever, Bill. Joseph Smith vs. the Book of Mormon: They Both Can’t Be Inspired. El Cajon, CA: Mormonism Research Ministry, 198?.
Display Abstract  

A small tract that presents perceived contradictions between Joseph Smith’s teachings and those found in the Book of Mormon.

ID = [77941]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1980-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Palmer, Grant H. “Joseph Smith, Captain Kidd, Cumorah, and Moroni.” John Whitmer Historical Association Journal 34, no. 1 (Spring, 2014): 50-57.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This article discusses the influence of Captain Kidd stories on Joseph Smith, suggesting that he searched for treasure often around the hill Cumorah, as well as a possible connection between Cumorah and the Comoro Islands.

Keywords: Historic sites, New York, Hill Cumorah; Smith, Joseph, Jr., occult, treasure seeking; Occult, treasure seeking
ID = [82002]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2014-03-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Roper, Matthew P. “Joseph Smith, Central American Ruins, and the Book of Mormon.” In Approaching Antiquity: Joseph Smith and the Ancient World, eds. Lincoln H. Blumell, Matthew J. Grey, and Andrew H. Hedges. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2015.
ID = [34692]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books,rsc-church-history,rsc-video  Size: 38832  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:47
Hullinger, Robert N. “Joseph Smith, Defender of the Faith.” Concordia Theological Monthly 42 (February 1971): 72-87.
Display Abstract  

Rejecting the Spaulding and psychological explanations for the origin of the Book of Mormon, the author believes that Joseph Smith wrote the Book of Mormon in an attempt to defend belief in God “against the sectarianism and popular skepticism of the day” He provides several interesting examples from the Book of Mormon to show how they fit within the environmentalist framework of such a thesis.

ID = [79648]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1971-02-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Spalding, Franklin Spencer. Joseph Smith, Jr., as a Translator: An Inquiry Conducted by Rt. Rev. F. S. Spalding; with the Kind Assistance of Capable Scholars. Salt Lake City: Arrow, 1912.
Display Abstract  

Presents the opinions of scholars that the translation of the Pearl of Great Price was a total failure, and Smith’s inaccurate translation of the Book of Abraham dismisses any accuracy of the Book of Mormon.

ID = [77942]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1912-01-01  Collections:  abraham,bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Smith, Elbert A. “Joseph Smith, Junior as a Translator.” Saints’ Herald 60 (4 June 1913): 541-45.
Display Abstract  

Responds to an article by the same name written by Rev. Bishop F. S. Spaulding, who attempts to discredit the Book of Mormon by attacking the translation of the book of Abraham. The position of the RLDS church is that Spaulding was not able to discredit the Book of Mormon completely, and it is impossible and unfair to judge the Book of Mormon except upon its own merits.

ID = [79649]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1913-06-04  Collections:  abraham,bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Jones, Wesley M. Joseph Smith, Messiah of the Last Days. Oakland, California: author, 1966.
Display Abstract  

The most critical mistake Joseph Smith made was to proclaim the Book of Mormon a “history” of Israel, linking it with the Old Testament. Finds that the book resembles Ethan Smith’s View of the Hebrews and Elias Boudinot’s Star in the West.

ID = [77943]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1966-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Roper, Matthew P. “Joseph Smith, Revelation, and Book of Mormon Geography.” FARMS Review 22, no. 2 (2010): 15-85.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Review of Bruce H. Porter and Rod L. Meldrum. Prophecies and Promises: The Book of Mormon and the United States of America.

Keywords: Ancient America; Book of Mormon Geography; Book of Mormon Geography – Heartland; Early Church History; Historicity; Joseph; Jr.; Prophecy; Smith
ID = [656]  Status = Type = review  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-review  Size: 156964  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:21
Rees, Robert A. “Joseph Smith, the Book of Mormon, and the American Renaissance.” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 35, no. 3 (Fall, 2002): 83-112.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

I am a literary critic who has spent a professional lifetime reading, teaching, and writing about literary texts. Much of my interest in and approach to the Book of Mormon lies with the text—though not just as a field for scholarly exploration.

Keywords: Smith, Joseph
ID = [81978]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2002-09-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Rees, Robert A. “Joseph Smith, the Book of Mormon, and the American Renaissance: An Update.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 19 (2016): 1-16.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: This is a follow-up to my article, “Joseph Smith and the American Renaissance,” published in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought in 2002.
My purpose in writing that article was to consider Joseph Smith in relation to his more illustrious contemporary American authors — Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitman. In that article I tried to demonstrate that in comparison with these writers, Joseph Smith did not possess the literary imagination, talent, authorial maturity, education, cultural milieu, knowledge base, or sophistication necessary to produce the Book of Mormon; nor, I argued, had he possessed all of these characteristics, nor was the time in which the book was produced sufficient to compose such a lengthy, complex, and elaborate narrative. This addendum takes the comparison one step further by examining each writer’s magnum opus and the background, previous writings, and preliminary drafts that preceded its publication — then comparing them with Joseph Smith’s publication of the Book of Mormon. That is, each of the major works of these writers of prose, fiction, and poetry as well as the scriptural text produced by Joseph Smith has a history — one that allows us to trace its evolution from inception to completion. .

ID = [3756]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 40557  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:43
Gillmor, B. F. “Joseph Smith, the Mormon Prophet: A Study of a Religious Psychopath.” Medical Herald 33 (April 1914): 151-56, 206-10, 237-38, 259-61, 338-42.
Display Abstract  

Pejorative psychological explanation of Joseph Smith. Claims that Joseph Smith “breathed an air saturated with the superstitions of debased forms of Christianity, pervaded with beliefs in signs, wonders and heavenly testimonials and peopled with spirits, angels and devils” Sees the Book of Mormon in this setting. Avers that while Joseph Smith worked on the Book of Mormon, he “appears to have assumed a multiplicity of personalities”

ID = [79650]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1914-04-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Anderson, Lawrence O. “Joseph Smith: A Student of American Antiquities.” University Archaeological Society Newsletter (30 January 1963): 1-7.
Display Abstract  

Joseph Smith had a deep interest in archaeological discoveries and antiquities of ancient America as can be seen from his writings, sermons, and personal conversations. He seemed to show particular interest in the discoveries in Central America as proof of Nephite and Lamanite existence. The ruined city of Quirigua he believed was the same as the city of Zarahemla.

ID = [79651]  Status = Type = newsletter article  Date = 1963-01-30  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Evans, John Henry. Joseph Smith: An American Prophet. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1989.
Display Abstract  

Chapter three deals specilically with the Book of Mormon, its coming forth and contents, and the positive effect it has had upon people.

ID = [77944]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1989-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Price, Robert M. “Joseph Smith: Inspired Author of the Book of Mormon.” In American Apocrypha: Essays on the Book of Mormon, edited by Dan Vogel and Brent Lee Metcalfe, 321-366. Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 2002.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

“The trembling hands of young Joseph Smith uncovered the buried golden plates of Mormon and Moroni, lost chapters of an undreamed-of history of Israelite tribes and the Christian Savior in the New World. As the depraved Lamanite had purused the Nephite Mormon and his son to death, so did young Smith feel besieged by the competing claims of rival evangelists and revivalists in his ’Burned-Over District.’ It was no surprise that the analogous tale told in the plates struck a note deep within him. And as the Nephites had long survived as a parallel branch of biblical Israel in the western hemisphere, so would the Church of the Latter-day Saints make its lonely but triumphant way through the generations as a parallel version of the Christian religion shared, at arm’s length, by most other Americans.”

Keywords: Book of Mormon, controversies; Book of Mormon, origins; Historic archaeology, Book of Mormon; Book of Mormon, authorship
ID = [82089]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2002-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:06
Hales, Brian C. “Joseph Smith: Monogamist or Polygamist?” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 25 (2017): 117-156.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: In the past decades much of the debate regarding Joseph Smith and plural marriage has focused on his motivation — whether libido or divine inspiration drove the process. Throughout these debates, a small group of observers and participants have maintained that Joseph did not practice polygamy at any time or that his polygamous sealings were nonsexual spiritual marriages. Rather than simply provide supportive evidence for Joseph Smith’s active involvement with plural marriage, this article examines the primary arguments advanced by monogamist proponents to show that important weaknesses exist in each line of reasoning.

ID = [3691]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 64593  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:43
Givens, Terryl L. “Joseph Smith: Prophecy, Process, and Plenitude.” BYU Studies 44, no. 4 (2005): 55-68.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Joseph Smith was an explorer, a discoverer, and a revealer of past worlds. He described an ancient America replete with elaborate detail and daring specificity, rooted and grounded in what he claimed were concrete, palpable artifacts. He recuperated texts of Adam, Abraham, Enoch, and Moses to resurrect and reconstitute a series of past patriarchal ages, not as mere shadows and types of things to come, but as dispensations of gospel fullness equaling, and in some cases surpassing, present plenitude. And he revealed an infinitely receding premortal past—not of the largely mythic Platonic variety and not a mere Wordsworthian, sentimental intimation—but a fully formed realm of human intelligences, divine parents, and heavenly councils.

Keywords: Joseph; Jr.; Prophecy; Prophet; Smith
ID = [11434]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2005-01-04  Collections:  abraham,bmc-archive,bom,byu-studies  Size: 29544  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:00:21
Baugh, Alexander L. “Joseph Smith: Seer, Translator, Revelator, and Prophet.” Devotional, Brigham Young University, June 24, 2014.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

When discussing Joseph Smith’s role as a translator, many only associate the Prophet with his role in the translation of the Book of Mormon. However, he successfully translated at least three additional ancient texts.

Keywords: Joseph Smith; Collection: Joseph Smith the Prophet; Podcast: Joseph Smith
ID = [69920]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 2014-06-24  Collections:  bom,byu-speeches  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:06:05
E., F. Joseph Smith: The Martyr, In His Own Defense. Australia: Australian Tract Club, 1908.
Display Abstract  

Published first in the Salt Lake Tribune, July 26, 1908, written as if Joseph Smith had authored this pamphlet. The Book of Mormon condemns polygamy as an abomination. Charges that none of Joseph’s words can be used to vindicate this practice. The Lord does not allow polygamy in his church.

ID = [77945]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1908-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Dale, Bruce E., and Brian Dale. “Joseph Smith: The World’s Greatest Guesser (A Bayesian Statistical Analysis of Positive and Negative Correspondences between the Book of Mormon and The Maya).” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 32 (2019): 77-186.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: Dr. Michael Coe is a prominent Mesoamerican scholar and author of a synthesis and review of ancient Mesoamerican Indian cultures entitled The Maya.
Dr. Coe is also a prominent skeptic of the Book of Mormon. However, there is in his book strong evidence that favors the Book of Mormon, which Dr. Coe has not taken into account. This article analyzes that evidence, using Bayesian statistics. We apply a strongly skeptical prior assumption that the Book of Mormon “has little to do with early Indian cultures,” as Dr. Coe claims. We then compare 131 separate positive correspondences or points of evidence between the Book of Mormon and Dr. Coe’s book. We also analyze negative points of evidence between the Book of Mormon and The Maya, between the Book of Mormon and a 1973 Dialogue article written by Dr. Coe, and between the Book of Mormon and a series of Mormon Stories podcast interviews given by Dr. Coe to Dr. John Dehlin. After using the Bayesian methodology to analyze both positive and negative correspondences, we reach an enormously stronger and very positive conclusion. There is overwhelming evidence that the Book of Mormon has physical, political, geographical, religious, military, technological, and cultural roots in ancient Mesoamerica. As a control, we have also analyzed two other books dealing with ancient American Indians: View of the Hebrews and Manuscript Found. We compare both books with The Maya using the same statistical methodology and demonstrate that this methodology leads to rational conclusions about whether or not such books describe peoples and places similar to those described in The Maya.

ID = [3577]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 64863  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:42
Dale, Bruce E., and Brian Dale. “Joseph Smith: The World’s Greatest Guesser – A Bayesian Statistical Analysis of Positive and Negative Correspondences Between the Book of Mormon and The Maya, 9th Edition.” Paper presented at the 2020 FairMormon Conference. August, 2020.
ID = [32680]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 2020-08-01  Collections:  bom,fair-conference  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:37
Evans, Richard C. Joseph Smith: Was He a Prophet of God?. Independence, MO: Ensign Publishing House, April 1902.
Display Abstract  

Many bear witness of Joseph Smith’s divine mission and the Book of Mormon’s authenticity. They never denied their testimonies. Many reformers testilied of the apostasy of the Church and looked forward to a restoration. During the lirst vision Joseph was told to join no church. An angel delivered the Book of Mormon plates restoring the primitive gospel of Christ.

ID = [77946]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1902-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Hinckley, Gordon B. “Joseph Smith: ‘Praise to the Man’” Devotional, Brigham Young University, November 4, 1979.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Joseph Smith did not write the Book of Mormon. Rather, “by the gift and power of God” he translated the writings of many authors who wrote at different times and under various circumstances.

Keywords: Joseph Smith; Collection: Joseph Smith the Prophet; Podcast: Joseph Smith
ID = [68582]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 1979-11-04  Collections:  bom,byu-speeches  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:05:53
Welch, John W., and Miriam A. Smith. “Joseph Smith: ”Author and Proprietor”.” In Reexploring the Book of Mormon: A Decade of New Research, ed. John W. Welch. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1992.
Display Keywords
Keywords: Book of Mormon Copyright; Book of Mormon Translation; Latter-day Saint History (1820-1846); Smith; Joseph; Jr.
ID = [66486]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-books,welch  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:05:37
McGavin, E. Cecil. “Joseph Smith—An Inspired Translator.” Deseret News Church Section (14 July 1934): 6.
Display Abstract  

Gives evidence and reasons that Joseph Smith did not quote from the Bible in translating the Book of Mormon as many critics suggest.

ID = [79654]  Status = Type = newspaper article  Date = 1934-07-14  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Durham, G. Homer. Joseph Smith—Prophet-Statesman. Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1944.
Display Abstract  

The first section of this work focuses on “the political theory of the Book of Mormon” Several political aspects are treated, including the founding of the Nephite republic (Mosiah 29:10-29), the welfare of the state (Alma 4:11-12, 15-20), and the ideal Christian society (4 Nephi 1-3, 16-17).

ID = [77950]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1944-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Stott, G. St. John. “Joseph Smith’s 1823 Vision: Uncovering the Angel Message.” Religion 18 (October 1988): 347-62.
Display Abstract  

Scott examines the different versions of the account of Joseph Smith’s 1823 vision, and he notes how the story was amplified over time. With these comparisons, Scott notes anachronisms that betray the falseness of the origins of the Book of Mormon.

ID = [79652]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1988-10-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
“Joseph Smith’s 234 Pound Gold Plates?” Utah Christian Tract Society 9 (September-October 1974): 2.
Display Abstract  

Claims that the gold plates may have weighed 234 pounds, making them far too heavy for a single individual to carry.

ID = [79653]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1974-09-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:51
Givens, Terryl L. “Joseph Smith’s American Bible: Radicalizing the Familiar.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture 18, no. 2 (2009): 4-17.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

The Book of Mormon treats many topics that most nineteenth-century Christians would have been thoroughly familiar with: the fall, atonement, and resurrection, just to name a few. However, the Book of Mormon treats these subjects in a way that would have required such readers to rethink their relationship with the divine, their place in Christian history, and God’s relationship to history. Christ’s visit to the New World, the continuance of the scriptural canon, and abundant personalized revelation all create a text that is both familiar and radical.

Keywords: Atonement; Canon; Early Church History; Fall of Adam; Resurrection; Revelation
ID = [3236]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 51544  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Wayment, Thomas A. “Joseph Smith’s Developing Relationship with the Apocrypha.” In Approaching Antiquity: Joseph Smith and the Ancient World, Brigham Young University Church History Symposium, eds. Lincoln H. Blumell, Matthew J. Grey and Andrew H. Hedges, 331–355. Provo and Salt Lake City, UT: BYU Religious Studies Center and Deseret Book, 2015.
Display Abstract  

Several approaches to interpreting Joseph Smith’s use of the so-called Jewish and Christian apocryphal literature have been employed both by critics of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (hereafter LDS), and by those professing faith in the Church and whose interests may be classified as apologetic. These approaches span the range of being probative of Joseph Smith’s restoration of lost texts and scripture and being dismissive of Mormonism generally, because its sacred religious texts are founded on flagrant plagiarism of apocryphal literature.[1] Before one can answer the most important historical question at hand, how Joseph Smith used the Apocrypha and what relationship that body of literature had to early Mormon writings, it seems prudent to first of all establish some controls on the discussion. This is necessary because previous discussions have largely contented themselves with drawing out parallels between apocryphal writings and early Mormon publications without any discussion of whether or not Joseph Smith had access to the texts under discussion. Moreover, a wide variety of modern translations of ancient apocryphal texts are often employed when there is no possible way that someone living in the early nineteenth century could have known them. This is particularly important when citing phrases or words that Joseph Smith might have incorporated into the language of his revelations.

ID = [2662]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  bom,moses,old-test,rsc-books,rsc-church-history,rsc-video  Size: 48561  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:36
Backman, Milton V., Jr. Joseph Smith’s First Vision. Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1971, [R]1980.
Display Abstract  

Provides the accounts of Joseph Smith’s first vision. Also, contains a description of the religious and economical environment of Palmyra as a background for the first vision. Uses the Book of Mormon as a witness of Joseph Smith’s divine calling. A separate chapter gives a brief account of the Three Witnesses and the Eight Witnesses.

ID = [77947]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1971-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Pratt, Orson. “Joseph Smith’s First Visions—The Book of Mormon—American Indians Descendants of the House of Israel—Prophecies Fulfilled.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 17. 1875, 278–288.
Display Abstract  

Discourse by Elder Orson Pratt, delivered in the New Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Sunday Afternoon, September 20, 1874. Reported By: David W. Evans.

ID = [29235]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 1874-09-20  Collections:  bom,jnl-disc,pratt-orson  Size: 38188  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:12:39
Bushman, Richard Lyman. “Joseph Smith’s Gold Plates: A Cultural History.” Paper presented at the 2023 FAIR Defending the Book of Mormon Conference. September 22-23, 2023.
ID = [81864]  Status = Type = talk,website article  Date = 2023-09-22  Collections:  bom,fair-conference  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:04
Wright, David P. “Joseph Smith’s Interpretation of Isaiah in the Book of Mormon.” Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought 31, no. 4 (Winter, 1998): 181-206.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This study of Isaiah in the [Book of Mormon] will first briefly examine the source of the [Book of Mormon] Isaiah text with a recommendation for a historical approach to the study of the text. Then, using this approach, it will explore two examples of the [Book of Mormon]’s interpretation of Isaiah, one where the interpretation follows the citation and one where the interpretation is interwoven with the Isaiah text.

Keywords: Smith, Joseph, Jr., Bible and; Bible, use and influence; Book of Mormon, Joseph Smith’s translation of
ID = [81969]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1998-12-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Dirkmaat, Gerrit J., and Michael Hubbard MacKay. “Joseph Smith’s Negotiations to Publish the Book of Mormon.” In The Coming Forth of the Book of Mormon, eds. Dennis L. Largey, Andrew H. Hedges, John Hilton III, and Kerry Hull. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2015.
ID = [34712]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2015-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books,rsc-sperry  Size: 42002  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:47
Faulring, Scott H., Kent P. Jackson, and Robert J. Matthews, eds. Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible: Original Manuscripts. Provo, UT: BYU Religious Studies Center, 2004.
Display Abstract  

The latter-day restoration of the gospel included the restoration of much significant truth to the Bible. It brought about the restoration of biblical history that had been lost and the restoration of biblical texts that had been changed or omitted or were in need of clarification. More important, it included the restoration of biblical doctrine that had been either removed, distorted, or simply misinterpreted by a world that did not enjoy the fulness of the gospel.
Shortly after the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saint was organized, the Prophet Joseph Smith was instructed by the Lord to undertake a careful reading of the Bible to revise and make corrections in accordance with the inspiration that he would receive. The result was a work of profound significance for the Church that included the revelation of many important truths and the restoration of many of the “precious things” that the Book of Mormon prophet Nephi had foretold would be taken from the Bible (1 Ne. 13:23–29). In June 1830 the first revealed addition to the Bible was set to writing. Over the next three years, the Prophet made changes, additions, and corrections as were given him by divine inspiration while he filled his calling to provide a more correct translation for the Church. Collectively, these are called the Joseph Smith Translation (JST), a name first applied in the 1970s, or the New Translation, as Joseph Smith and others in his day referred to it.

ID = [2464]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2004-01-01  Collections:  bom,moses,rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:34
Anderson, Rodger I. Joseph Smith’s New York Reputation Reexamined. Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 1990.
Display Abstract  

In an effort to discount the Book of Mormon, Philastus Hurlbut collected over eighty signatures of those who knew the bad character of Joseph Smith and his family (affidavits contained in the appendix). Author examines Hugh Nibley’s Myth Makers and finds misrepresentations and failure to consider vital sources. Considers Richard L. Anderson’s “Joseph Smith’s New York Reputation Reappraised,” finding it also to fall short. This author finds that the allegations against Joseph Smith are true since the testimonies of many New York citizens have not been discredited.

ID = [77948]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1990-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Tanner, Jerald, and Sandra Tanner. Joseph Smith’s Plagiarism of the Bible in the Book of Mormon. Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah Lighthouse Ministry, 2010.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

“Besides the extensive list of parallels between the Bible and the Book of Mormon, this book examines many other possible sources used to create the text, i.e. the Apocrypha, the Westminster Confession, various newspapers and books, etc. Also examined is the Solomon Spalding theory, common phrases, chiasmus (Hebrew poetic form), influence of Freemasonry and folk magic, and the problems with the loss of the first 116 pages of the Book of Mormon manuscript.”

Keywords: Book of Mormon, controversies; Bible, use and influence; Book of Mormon
ID = [81529]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2010-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:02
Read, Lenet Hadley. “Joseph Smith’s Receipt of the Plates and the Israelite Feast of Trumpets.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 2, no. 2 (1993): 110-120.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Joseph Smith received the golden plates on the Israelite Day of Remembrance (or Rosh ha-Shanah). Biblical references and interpretation by Jewish sages through the centuries set this day as the day God would remember his covenants with Israel to bring them back from exile. Also called the Feast of Trumpets, this day features ritual trumpet blasts to signify the issuance of revelation and a call for Israel to gather for God’s word of redemption. The day, which is set at the time of Israel’s final agricultural harvest, also symbolizes the Lord’s final harvest of souls. Furthermore, it initiates the completion of the Lord’s time periods, the Days of Awe, and signifies the last time to prepare for final judgment and the Messianic Age. The coming forth of the Book of Mormon is literally fulfilling such prophecies of the day.

Keywords: Ancient Near East; Early Church History; Festival; Gold Plates; Israelite Feast of Trumpets; Joseph; Jr.; Plates; Prophecy; Smith; Translation
ID = [2845]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1993-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 26613  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:37
Hullinger, Robert N. Joseph Smith’s Response to Skepticism. Salt Lake City: Signature Books, 1992.
Display Abstract  

Explains Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon on the basis of the contemporary environment. Deals with the purpose of the Book of Mormon and Joseph Smith as its translator or author. Includes chapters on the “lost book” of the Indians, the “sticks” in Ezekiel 37, the prophecies in Isaiah, and the role of masonry.

ID = [77949]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
MacKay, Michael Hubbard, and Nicholas J. Frederick. Joseph Smith’s Seer Stones. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2016.
Display Abstract  

This book discusses the origins of Joseph Smith’s seer stones and explores how Joseph used them throughout his life in a way that goes beyond translating the Book of Mormon. It also traces the provenance of the seer stones once they leave his possession. The authors also examine how the Book of Mormon itself provides a storyline about the history of seer stones, which also helped Joseph Smith learn about his own prophetic gifts. Finally, this book explores how Joseph Smith took his own experiences with seer stones and created a theology of seer stones that became closely linked with his unique doctrines of exaltation. ISBN 978-1-9443-9405-9

ID = [33224]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2016-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:38
Hardy, Grant R. “Joseph Smith’s Statements on the Book of Mormon.” In The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ, ed. Grant Hardy. Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center, Brigham Young University, 2019.
ID = [37221]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,rsc-books  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:47
Teasdale, George. “Joseph Smith’s Testimony Never Proven False—Primitive Organization of the Church—Work of Christ not Completed When He Said, ‘It is Finished’—Why Should So Much Fault Be Found With the Latter-Day Saints?—The World’s Objection to ‘Mormonism’—History of the Apostles—Authority to Preach the Gospel Restored—Temples—Baptism for the Dead—Book of Mormon—Restoration of the Priesthood—Cause of Persecution—No Surrender—Plural Marriage.” In Journal of Discourses, Volume 25. 1884, 13–22.
Display Abstract  

Discourse by Apostle George Teasdale, delivered in the Assembly Hall, Salt Lake City, Sunday Afternoon, January 13, 1884. Reported By: John Irvine.

ID = [29576]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 1884-01-13  Collections:  bom,jnl-disc  Size: 31617  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:12:42
Ricks, Stephen D. “Joseph Smith’s Translation of the Book of Mormon.” Preliminary Report. Provo, UT: Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies, 1986. “Joseph Smith’s Translation of the Book of Mormon” may be reproduced and used, without alteration, addition, or deletion, for any nonpecuniary or nonpublishing purpose without permission.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Stephen Ricks discusses what Joseph Smith and his companions said about translating the Book of Mormon. They document the intense period of activity from April to June 1829, during which nearly all the translation took place.

Keywords: Church History
ID = [8574]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1986-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-reports  Size: 209  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 9:59:58
Valdeon, Roberto. “Joseph Smith’s Use of Pseudo-Intralingual and Intersemiotic Translation in the Creation of the Mormon Canon: The Book of Mormon, the Bible, and the Book of Abraham.” Across Languages and Cultures 15, no. 2 (December, 2014): 219-241.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

“The 19th century Book of Mormon, which was at the base of the creation and spread of a new religious movement in the United States, has been used as an example of what translation scholars have called pseudo-translations (Toury 1995, 2005; Hermans 2007; Vidal 2010). However, the Mormon canon is based upon other documents, also presented as translations to Mormon believers. This paper examines the use of translation as the instrument of normalization of the Mormon movement. The first sections provide a short introduction to the emergence of Mormonism in New York State and to the role of translation in the spread of Christianity. From here we move to study the three types of translations Joseph Smith, the founder of the Church, claimed to have resorted to for the production of his three major works, i.e. The Book of Mormon, the translation of the Bible and the Book of Abraham. In other words, pseudo-translation, interlingual translation and intersemiotic translation. The final section contends that translation is the key element that gives cohesion to the three. It also discusses a controversial component of the original “translated” doctrine : the allegations that racism is present in the original works and the ways in which the Church has coped with such allegations.” [Abstract from Article]

Keywords: Pearl of Great Price; Pearl of Great Price, Book of Abraham; Bible, Joseph Smith’s translation; Book of Mormon; Smith, Joseph, Jr., translator; Egyptian papyri; pseudotranslation; intralingual translation; intersemiotic translation
ID = [82023]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2014-12-01  Collections:  abraham,bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:06
Anderson, Edward H., and Joseph F. Smith. “Joseph Smith’s ‘Translation’ of the Scriptures.” Improvement Era 17, no. 6 (1914): 590-596.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This article quotes the Eighth Article of Faith declaring that Latter-day Saints believe both the Bible and the Book of Mormon to be the words of God. Nephi taught that the Hebrew scriptures had “plain and precious parts” removed. For this reason Joseph Smith was called on to revise the Bible and produce an “inspired translation.

Keywords: Articles of Faith, Joseph Smith Translation, Plain and Precious Things
ID = [76832]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1914-04-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,improvement-era,smith-joseph-f.  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:30
Hart, Charles H. “Joseph the Prophet.” Improvement Era 23, no. 6 (1920): 491-495.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This article argues that it is more difficult to think Joseph Smith could invent the Book of Mormon, given his youth, limited experience, and opportunities, than to believe he was inspired. Joseph would have needed extensive research to have learned, for example, that Native Americans used stone boxes for the burial of valuables, a fact virtually unknown in his day. Not until 1906 were such boxes discovered in the areas of Toronto, Tennessee, Illinois, and New Mexico.

Keywords: Apologetics, Book of Mormon Authorship, External Evidence, First Vision, Jr., Latter-day Saint History (1820-1846), Smith, Joseph
ID = [77167]  Status = Type = magazine article  Date = 1920-04-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,improvement-era  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:32
Blair, William W. Joseph the Seer: His Prophetic Mission Vindicated. Plano, IL: Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1877.
Display Abstract  

An apologetic work written in reply to an attack made by Rev. William Sheldon against Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon.

ID = [77951]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1877-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Gardner, Brant A. “Joseph the Seer—or Why Did He Translate With a Rock in His Hat?” Paper presented at the 2009 FairMormon Conference Conference. August, 2009.
Display Keywords
Keywords: Book of Mormon Translation; Joseph; Jr.; Latter-day Saint History (1820-1846); Seer stone; Smith
ID = [32462]  Status = Type = talk  Date = 2009-08-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,fair-conference  Size: 60518  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 10:52:36
Black, Susan Easton, and Andrew C. Skinner. Joseph: Exploring the Life and Ministry of the Prophet. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book (2005).
Display Abstract  

Explore the life and mission of Joseph Smith in this six-episode DVD and the companion book of essays. Thirty-three respected scholars — including Richard E Turley Jr., Andrew C. Skinner, Larry C. Porter, Milton V. Backman and Robert J. Matthews — examine a variety of topics about the Prophet. This volume and DVD teach us about Joseph Smith while nourishing our testimonies that he was indeed the Lord\'s anointed prophet, called to bring forth the truths of the gospel of Jesus Christ. Latter-day Saints will treasure them both!

ID = [82082]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2005-01-01  Collections:  bom,smith-joseph-jr  Size:   Children: 5  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:06

Articles

Williams, Clyde J., and Andrew C. Skinner. “Insights from Moroni’s Visits in 1823.” In Joseph: Exploring the Life and Ministry of the Prophet, edited by Black, Susan Easton, and Andrew C. Skinner, 47-56. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2005.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This essay simply recounts the visits and messages of Moroni to the Prophet Joseph.

Keywords: Smith, Joseph, Jr., angelic visitations; Moroni, visitations; Angels
ID = [82110]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2005-01-01  Collections:  bom,church-history  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:06
Underwood, Grant. “The Book of Lehi.” In Joseph: Exploring the Life and Ministry of the Prophet, edited by Black, Susan Easton, and Andrew C. Skinner, 76-84. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2005.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This essay tells the story of the lost 116 pages of the Book of Lehi.

Keywords: Harris, Martin; Doctrine and Covenants, Section 3; Book of Mormon; Book of Mormon, Lost 116 pages
ID = [82114]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2005-01-01  Collections:  bom,d-c  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:06
Faulring, Scott H. “Oliver Cowdery, Book of Mormon Scribe.” In Joseph: Exploring the Life and Ministry of the Prophet, edited by Black, Susan Easton, and Andrew C. Skinner, 85-94. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2005.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This chapter documents Oliver’s position as the main scribe of the Book of Mormon translation in 1829.

Keywords: Cowdery, Oliver; Book of Mormon, Joseph Smith’s translation of
ID = [82112]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2005-01-01  Collections:  bom,church-history  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:06
Wilson, Keith J. “The Three Witnesses.” In Joseph: Exploring the Life and Ministry of the Prophet, edited by Black, Susan Easton, and Andrew C. Skinner, 95-106. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2005.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Each of the three witnesses played a vital role in assisting the bringing forth of the Book of Mormon, besides simply testifying of its truthfulness. Martin Harris financed the project, Oliver Cowdery served as the principle scribe, working at a remarkable pace, and David Whitmer provided lodging in Fayette for the completion of the project.

Keywords: Harris, Martin; Cowdery, Oliver; Book of Mormon, witnesses; Whitmer, David
ID = [82111]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2005-01-01  Collections:  bom,church-history  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:06
Jackson, Kent P. “Publishing the Book of Mormon.” In Joseph: Exploring the Life and Ministry of the Prophet, edited by Black, Susan Easton, and Andrew C. Skinner, 107-16. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 2005.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This chapter details the printing process of the first five thousand copies of the Book of Mormon by E.B. Grandin for three thousand dollars.

Keywords: Skinner, Andrew C.; Grandin, E. B.; Book of Mormon, printing
ID = [82113]  Status = Type = book article  Date = 2005-01-01  Collections:  bom,church-history  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:06
Larsen, Val. “Josiah to Zoram to Sherem to Jarom and the Big Little Book of Omni.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 44 (2021): 217-264.
Display Abstract  

Abstract: The first 450 years of Nephite history are dominated by two main threads: the ethno-political tension between Nephites and Lamanites and religious tension between adherents of rival theologies. These rival Nephite theologies are a Mantic theology that affirms the existence of Christ and a Sophic theology that denies Christ. The origin of both narrative threads lies in the Old World: the first in conflicts between Nephi and Laman, the second in Lehi’s rejection of King Josiah’s theological and political reforms. This article focuses on these interrelated conflicts. It suggests that Zoram, Laman, Lemuel, Sherem, and the Zeniffites were Deuteronomist followers of Josiah. The small plates give an account of how their Deuteronomist theology gradually supplanted the gospel of Christ. As the small plates close, their last author, Amaleki, artfully confronts his readers with a life-defining choice: having read the Book of Mormon thus far, will you remain, metaphorically, with the prophets in Zarahemla and embrace the Restored Gospel of Jesus Christ, or will you return to the land of Nephi and the theology you believed and the life you lived before you read the Book of Mormon?.

ID = [3419]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2021-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 64766  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:41
McGuire, Benjamin L. “Josiah’s Reform: An Introduction.” Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship 4 (2013): 161-163.
Display Abstract  

In 1951 in The Improvement Era, Sidney B. Sperry published a short article titled “Some Problems of Interest Relating to the Brass Plates.” In this article he outlines several problems including issues related to the Pentateuch, Jeremiah’s prophecies, The Book of the Law, and the Brass Plates themselves. In many ways, Sperry laid down a gauntlet that has been taken up many times by LDS scholars looking for answers that help to explain these issues in the Book of Mormon within the context of the best current biblical scholarship.

ID = [4364]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2013-01-01  Collections:  bom,interpreter-journal  Size: 4718  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:44:56
Szink, Terrence L. “Josué Sánchez, trans. And ed., El Libro de Mormon ante la crítica.” Review of Books on the Book of Mormon 5 (1993): Article 39.
Display Abstract  

Review of El Libro de Mormon ante la critica (1992), by Josué Sánchez

ID = [156]  Status = Type = review  Date = 1993-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-review  Size: 19791  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:18
Talmage, James E. “Journal Abstracts and Letters 1876-1933.” N.p.: n.p.,n.d.
Display Abstract  

A collection of papers from letters and journals kept by Talmage. Two letters report Talmage’s work on revision of the Book of Mormon, suggesting to the First Presidency a list of minor revisions.

ID = [77952]  Status = Type = manuscript  Date = 0000-00-00  Collections:  bom,talmage  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:53:38
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies Volume 26. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
ID = [81886]  Status = Type = book, compendium  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 13  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05

Articles

Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. “Front Matter.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
ID = [81889]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Pulsipher, J. David. “Buried Swords: The Shifting Interpretive Ground of a Beloved Book of Mormon Narrative.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

In November 2014 Latter-day Saint children around the world participated in a ritual that would probably seem odd to outsiders-they buried some swords. These weren’t actual weapons, of course, only sketches of swords upon which the children were instructed to “write a wrong choice… such as ’fighting with my brother’ or ’telling a lie.’” They then “buried” these swords by “crumpling their papers or throwing them away.” Similarly, in February 2010 a small group of teenagers stood with their own paper swords around a freshly dug hole on their church’s property. “I had my class write down a behavior of theirs, if they had one, which might be considered an act of ’rebellion to God,’” recalled their teacher. “Their challenge was to pick one thing they were serious about stopping. I asked them to pick something they felt they could put aside… forever.”

ID = [81890]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Austin, Michael. “How the Book of Mormon Reads the Bible: A Theory of Types.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

Typology is one of those words whose meaning shifts dramatically with the position of its user. For religious believers studying the scriptures, typology is a mode of history-the belief that certain events and people should be understood as both fully historical and fully allegorical at the same time. To the unbeliever (or the believer in different things), typology is a mode of rhetoric-a connecting strategy that writers use to create retroactive links between otherwise unrelated stories or that readers use to infer connections between otherwise unconnected things. Those in the first group see the repetition of key narrative elements from the Old Testament to the New Testament-say, birth narratives in which both Moses and Jesus escape from an infanticidal massacre ordered by a despot-as a fundamental part of how sacred history works ( see Exodus 1:22 and Matthew 2:16-18).

ID = [81891]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Morrill, Susanna. “Women and the Book of Mormon: The Creation and Negotiation of a Latter-day Saint Tradition.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

The following article by Susanna Morrill first appeared in Historicizing “Tradition” in the Study of Religion, ed. Steven Engler and Gregory Price Grieve (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2005), 127-44. We believe that it has, unfortunately, not received the attention it deserves for the light it sheds on the ways the Book of Mormon has been received by its readers. Morrill writes from the perspective that the Book of Mormon is a product of the nineteenth-century, but we feel that all stand to learn much from her analysis. We would like to express our gratitude to Professor Morrill, as well as to De Gruyter, for allowing us to reprint the essay. Similarly, she ruefully recounted her visit to Phoenix, a city originally settled and then given up by Mormon pioneers.

ID = [81892]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Reynolds, Noel B. “Biblical Merismus in Book of Mormon Gospel References.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 2015 annual Society of Biblical Literature meeting, November 23, 2015, in Atlanta, Georgia. 1. See Noel B. Reynolds, “The Gospel of Jesus Christ as Taught by the Nephite Prophets;’ BYU Studies 31/3 (1991): 31-50; and Noel B. Reynolds, “The Gospel according to Mormon;’ Scottish Journal of Theology 68/2 (2015): 218-34 doi:10.1017/ S003693061500006X. 2. Inclusio is a common technique used by biblical writers to mark off a text unit by repeating at the end of the unit a word or phrase or sentence used at the beginning. These three Book of Mormon passages are marked off with obvious inclusios featuring “the doctrine of Christ;’ “this is my doctrine;’ and “this is my gospel” respectively. While Nephi constructed the first, the second two are embedded in the material quoted from Jesus Christ. In “Chiastic Structuring of Large Texts: Second Nephi as a Case Study;’ publication pending, I demonstrate that 2 Nephi can be read as a series of thirteen inclusios arranged to provide a chiastic structure to the book that also communicates his principal thesis.

ID = [81893]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Axelgard, Frederick W. “More Than Meets the Eye: How Nephite Prophets Managed the Jaredite Legacy.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

This paper looks closely and critically at how the Nephite prophets dealt with the records of the Jaredites as the text of the Book of Mormon itself presents these dealings. 1 It questions unspoken assumptions that often pervade discussions of these records and of how record keepers from King Mosiah2 to Moroni managed them. It asks, for example, whether Mormon could realistically have taken on the task of preparing the abridgment of Jaredite history found in the book of Ether. It also challenges the idea that Moroni wrote the book of Ether only because Mormon did not have time to do so, suggesting instead that Moroni’s role in preserving the Jaredite legacy was his own unique commission from the Lord. These questions are part of my appeal for a fundamental reconsideration of the roles played by the key actors who handled the Jaredite records.

ID = [81894]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Handley, George B. “Reading and the Menardian Paradox in 3 Nephi.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

In the Old World Jesus taught, “Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled” (Matthew 5:6), yet in the New World he says, “Blessed are all they who do hunger and thirst after righteousness, for they shall be filled with the Holy Ghost” (3 Nephi 12:6). Attention, understandably, has been given to the differences, large and small, between the Sermon on the Mount as recounted in the New Testament and the similar sermon given in the New World. At times, we note slight shifts in emphasis (here in the New World, for example, Jesus makes this promise to “all”), more complete understandings (we are filled specifically with the influence of the Holy Ghost), and so on. And these differences raise compelling questions about the possibility that plain and precious truths were lost in translation in the Bible but are restored again in the Book of Mormon. The differences might also suggest the importance of a shifting context that moves Jesus to vary his speech. One wonders if one version is more authoritative than the other. But there is an additional question the two accounts of Christ’s sermon raise. What do readers make of the fact that in most cases the wording is exactly coincident? What might that signify?

ID = [81895]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Blythe, Christopher James. “‘A Very Fine Azteck Manuscript’: Latter-day Saint Readings of Codex Boturini.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

THE BooK OF MORMON presented itself as a history of previously unidentified New World civilizations with origins in the ancient Near East. To defend its claims of historicity, believers pointed to the work’s correspondence with the Bible and their own spiritual witnesses. They also insisted that, independent of their supernatural access to this ancient world, archaeological discoveries had authenticated and would continue to authenticate the book’s historical claims. This article documents the all-but-forgotten Latter-day Saint use of Codex Boturini-a sixteenth-century Mesoamerican codex depicting the Mexica (i.e., Aztec) migration from their mythical homeland Atzlan to Tenochtitlan, the seat of the empire’s government-as physical evidence for Book of Mormon history. In the perspective of these Saints, the pictorial manuscript was an independent record of the Book of Mormon. For decades, Mormons published images from Codex Boturini (or described them) alongside commentary that translated the pictographs through a Mormon lens.

ID = [81896]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Bowman, Matthew. “Book Reviews.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

In his foreward to this book, Richard Bushman praises it for its meticulous attention to the historian’s craft. Michael MacKay and Gerrit Dirkmaat have served as editors on the Documents series of the Joseph Smith Papers Project-spending months documenting, annotating, and organizing the surviving historical material from the early years of Joseph Smith’s religious career-and their experience with those primary sources shines in this volume. They have tracked down scraps of information in archives from New York to Utah, from obscure nineteenth-century publications as far-flung as the Ohio Observer and the Milwaukee Sentinel, and even from much better-known sources like the Joseph Smith revelations, which they have reread with a keen eye for detail and often-missed nuance.

ID = [81897]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Kerr, Jason A. “‘Virtue’ in Moroni 9:9.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

Latter-day Saint discussion of chastity often include Moroni 9:9 because of its suggestion that “chastity and virtue” constitute “that which is most dear and precious above all things:’ The verse also says, however, that people can be “deprived” of chastity and virtue by the violence of rape. For the prophet Mormon, the Nephites’ actions in Moriantum exceed “this great abomination of the Lamanites;’ which involved “feed[ing] the women upon the flesh of their husbands, and the children upon the flesh of their fathers” (Moroni 9:8). Mormon’s strong language aims to condemn the rapists, not their victims. Using the verse to teach about chastity, though, invites interpretation from the perspective of the victims, which raises the question of what it means to understand chastity and virtue as something of which a person can be deprived, passively, by another. Such passive loss of virtue runs strongly contrary to LDS teaching about agency, including those rooted in Book of Mormon passages like 2 Nephi 2, with the consequence that victims of sexual abuse or assault can be made to feel guilty for sins that are not their own.

ID = [81898]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Smith, Julie M. “An Analysis of Benjaminite and Markan Christology.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

The term Christology refers to the presentation of the life and nature of Jesus Christ. The purpose of this essay is to explore King Benjamin’s Christology (see Mosiah 3), to consider its similarities to that found in the Gospel of Mark, and to explore some implications of Benjamin’s Christology. Christology is often described as being on a continuum from low (which emphasizes the human nature of Jesus) to high (which emphasizes his divine nature). It is definitely the case that Benjamin’s description of Jesus contains elements of a high Christology since he begins by describing Jesus as “the Lord Omnipotent who reigneth, who was, and is from all eternity to all eternity” (Mosiah 3:5). Yet the very next line describes Jesus as “dwell[ing] in a tabernacle of clay” (Mosiah 3:5), which reflects a decidedly low Christology. This emphasis on the mortal nature of Jesus continues as Benjamin relates at length Jesus’s physical suffering (see Mosiah 3:7).

ID = [81899]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Spencer, Joseph M. “The Structure of the Book of Alma.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

Since John Welch discovered Chiasmus in the Book of Mormon fifty years ago, students of the volume have paid attention to textual structures. Unfortunately, little attention has yet been paid to book-length structures, structures organizing larger stretches of the Book of Mormon. Analysis of whole books within the Book of Mormon has largely remained in a preliminary phase.3 In this note, however, I lay out what appears to be the intentional organizational structure of the book of Alma.

ID = [81900]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. “A Book of Mormon Bibliography for 2016.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 26 (2017).
Display Abstract  

The Maxwell Institue is currently making efforts to update the work of Donald Parry, Jeanette Miller, and Sandra Thorne, who prepared the volume A Comprehensive Annotated Book of Mormon Bibliography (1996). This earlier work is now available at the Maxwell Institutes website (see http:/ /publications.mi.byu.edu/book/ a-comprehensive -annotated-book-of-mormon-bibliography/), and updates will also be made available on the Institute’s website. To assist in this effort, the editors of the Journal of Book of Mormon Studies have decided to include in each issue of the Journal a bibliography of scholarly work published on the Book of Mormon during the previous year. We have therefore made efforts to discover all work of an academic nature published during 2016 for inclusion in the following bibliography. The work has been undertaken primarily by Matthew Roper and Alex Criddle.

ID = [81901]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2017-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies Volume 27. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
ID = [81887]  Status = Type = book,compendium  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 18  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05

Articles

Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. “Front Matter.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
ID = [81902]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Johnson, Janiece Lyn. “Becoming a People of the Books: Toward an Understanding of Early Mormon Converts and the New Word of the Lord.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

Leather-bound copies of the first edition of the 586-page Book of Mormon were published and sold beginning March 26, 1830. Before there was a prophet, there was a translator-legally the “author and proprietor” of the Book. The title page told of the plates written “by the spirit of Prophecy and Revelation’’ from which the Book originated. Before the publication was complete, Joseph Smith had encouraged Oliver Cowdery that “a great call for our books” had already commenced. The Book emerged before there was any church to join. The rest would come later; initially individuals decided how they would respond to this “Golden Bible.” Was it counterfeit or divine? Was it the “greatest piece of superstition’’ or a “revelation from God”? What would it be to them?

ID = [81903]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Frederick, Nicholas J. “The Book of Mormon and Its Redaction of the King James New Testament: A Further Evaluation of the Interaction between the New Testament and the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

The text of the King James Bible plays a significant role in the composition of the Book of Mormon. While there have been studies that have attempted to identify what biblical passages are present in the Book of Mormon, not nearly enough effort has been spent exploring how those passages are used throughout the text. For example, one can readily identify the textual parallels between Alma 5:48 and John 1: 14, due to the sharing of phrases such as “full of grace and truth’’ and “only-begotten son:’ This type of research is useful in and of itself. But simply identifying what passages the texts share in common without exploring how the Book of Mormon integrates the biblical text into its own textual composition leaves a great deal unexplored.

ID = [81904]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Martin, Jan J. “The Theological Value of the King James Language in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

In 1831, Alexander Campbell (1788-1866), the founder of the Disciples of Christ Church and leader in the early nineteenth-century religious reformation known as the Restoration, published a short pamphlet entitled Delusions: An Analysis of the Book of Mormon: With an Examination of Its Internal and External Evidences, and a Refutation of Its Pretences to Divine Authority. In the pamphlet, Campbell argued that the Book of Mormon was a linguistic hodgepodge, “patched up and cemented with ’And it came to pass’ - ’I sayeth unto you’-’Ye saith unto him’-and all the King James’ haths, dids and doths-in the lowest imitation of the common version:’ He insisted that “it has not one good sentence in it, save the profanation of those sentences quoted from the Oracles of the living God:’ For Campbell, the seventeenth-century English in the Book of Mormon demonstrated that Joseph Smith was a fraud.

ID = [81905]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Spencer, Joseph M. “Teaching The Book of Mormon at the University of Vermont: An Interview with Elizabeth Fenton.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

Elizabeth Fenton’s first book-Religious Liberties: Anti-Catholicism and Liberal Democracy in Nineteenth-Century U.S. Literature and Culture-appeared in 2011. The next year, she began presenting work on the Book of Mormon, first in a conference paper at the annual convention of C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists, and then in an invited lecture at the University of Maryland titled “Why Americanists Should Read The Book of Mormon.” In 2013, she published her conference presentation from the previous year in J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists. The next year, Fenton organized a panel at C19 focused on the Book of Mormon, which drew the attention of Jared Hickman and opened the door to an important collaborative project, soon to come to fruition in the form of Americanist Approaches to the Book of Mormon, a collection of essays by various scholars forthcoming from Oxford University Press. In 2016, Fenton presented again at C19 on the Book of Mormon (this time in a comparative study involving The Anarchiad), and she also published in the Journal of Book of Mormon Studies a review essay focused on Grant Hardy’s Understanding the Book of Mormon. The past five or six years have, for Fenton, been focused in a remarkable way on literary study of the Book of Mormon.

ID = [81906]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Slayton, Jessica. “‘There cannot be any more Bible!’: Nineteenth-Century Visual Art and the Production of Memory in The Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

The Book of Mormon, told by a variety of narrators over a period of hundreds of years, is deeply concerned with remembrance and the written production of memory. As each narrator grows old and finishes his time recording the events of his people, he hands down the plates to a son or other trusted, younger male companion to continue writing the history and preserving the memories of their people. In this paper, I’d like to argue that nineteenth-century visual art becomes a continuation of the concern for and production of memory so present in The Book of Mormon itself. The book’s proclamation of itself as Bible-“And because my words shall hiss forth-many of the Gentiles shall say: A Bible! A Bible! We have got a Bible, and there cannot be any more Bible”-establishes its reliance on its own participation in the production of memory and highlights its own limited ability (given its status as a completed text) to continue the process of memory generation. I will first examine how The Book of Mormon presents the recording of memory and then turn to C. C. A. Christensen as a case study on how visual art entered the Mormon religious sphere in the nineteenth century as a way of re-recording the stories.

ID = [81907]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Erdmann, Angela. “Subjective Objects: ‘The Book of Pukei’ and Early Critical Response to The Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

Given the remarkable story of the discovery and divine translation of gold plates hidden in a hill by an ancient Amerindian prophet, nineteenth- century readers could be forgiven for expecting an exotic new set of doctrines in The Book of Mormon. Instead, what many readers found (when they bothered to read the book at all) was an often dull, frequently complicated narrative with the veneer of biblical language and themes. Where they expected to find a heretical “Gold Bible’’ designed to supplant and erase biblical authority, they instead found chapters lifted directly from the Bible itself. The Book of Mormon was a strange document indeed, having at once a “foundational role’’ in but also a “theological irrelevance’’ to a newly created religion, so that it was actually “the miracle the work embodied, not the doctrine it presented, that gave offense.”

ID = [81908]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Leahy, Sean. “‘Learned’ and ‘Unlearned’ Reading in The Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

In recalling his “First Vision” in 1820, Joseph Smith writes of the “anxieties” over the “contests of [the] parties of religionists” that drove him to seek solace in scripture and “attempt to pray vocally” for the first time in his young life. Smith describes turning to the Epistle of James, a reading that precipitated his calling out for an answer to his “anxieties.” The reply to Smith’s “vocal” prayer initiated a course of events that ultimately led to the publication of The Book of Mormon in March 1830. Since then, the story of the plates whose translation constitutes the text The Book of Mormon has provoked nearly as much-if not more-attention than the exceedingly complex narrative itself. The experience of reading the text poses challenges, though not because of its tedium (as Mark Twain suggested) or the demands it places on one’s willingness to suspend disbelief; instead, the challenges it poses derive, I will argue, from the way in which reading itself is figured in the text. This paper intends to take up the problem of reading and The Book of Mormon, which I believe the text presents but does not fully resolve.

ID = [81909]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Norton, Shawna. “Land as Regenerative Space in The Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

The Book of Mormon presents a tale of the plight and flight of a family from biblical Jerusalem, stitched together through a variety of narrators. As the title page claims, this book contains the record of the Nephite people, descendants of Lehi, who was commanded by God to leave Jerusalem in order to save his family from destruction. From that command, the text becomes one of movement and escape, so that the Nephite race can avoid destruction. As this story is one about avoiding annihilation, it necessarily becomes one of reproduction: How do the Nephites reproduce the people of God to spread the word of God?

ID = [81910]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Smith, Alana. “Messianic Time and The Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

Walter Benjamin famously claimed that “only a redeemed mankind is granted the fullness of its past-which is to say, only for a redeemed mankind has its past become citable in all its moments. Each moment it has lived becomes a citation a l’ordre du jour. And that day is Judgment Day.” The Book of Mormon (1830) posits a pathway to redemption for believers and organizes all time around the coming of Christ. I aim to use Benjamin’s model of messianic time to interpret the complicated formal and narrative temporalities in The Book of Mormon and to offer a possible answer to the question, “Why did The Book of Mormon materialize when and where it did?” The Book of Mormon anticipates its own appearance in the nineteenth century. This temporal peculiarity authorizes my reading of the sacred text in its economic and historical context. I will argue that Joseph Smith’s discovery and translation of the plates he unearthed on a hillside in Palmyra, New York, presented a challenge to the capitalist perception of time that threatened to further disenfranchise Smith and others in the Burned-over District.

ID = [81911]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Stevenson, Russell W. “Reckoning with Race in the Book of Mormon: A Review of Literature.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

Scholars of Mormonism have seen a deluge of race literature on the Book of Mormon flow over the past five years. Compared to the robust scholarship on the use of biblical literature in constructing race, Mormonism strikes one as the particularly colorful character who showed up late to the party. For a faith system that has started to imagine itself in global terms, the implications of this recent increase are profound and invite commentary from a variety of disciplines ranging from literary criticism to forensic anthropology. This review essay holds humble aspirations for itself: to trace the basic contours of racialization and deracialization in the Book of Mormon’s historiographical record, illustrating how the contestedness of the racial narrative reflects a variety of needs for Mormon reception of the Book of Mormon text. To close, I will speak to the Book of Mormon’s relevance as a point of entry for undermining Anglo-Saxon knowledge control.

ID = [81912]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Thomas, John Christopher, and Joseph M. Spencer. “Book Reviews.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

The unique role and function of the book of Isaiah in the Book of Mormon has rightly been of interest to a variety of readers, both scholarly and popular. A quick review of a portion of the literature reveals something of its ongoing appeal. For the most part, these studies have focused on explaining the reason for the extensive quotations of Isaiah in the Book of Mormon and/ or offering a rationale for the numerous differences between the text(s) of Isaiah cited in the Book of Mormon and the text(s) of lsaiah found in a variety of other places including the King James Version of the Bible. Often these studies have been related to the larger issue of Joseph Smith’s involvement in the production of the Book of Mormon. Though a number of these studies are fascinating and merit careful reading, what has been missing, in my estimation, is a sustained treatment of the topic from the perspective of a close theological reading of the text. In other words, most of these studies have focused on the production end of the question-What did Joseph Smith or Nephi use and what may be learned by the actions of the author?-while much less attention has been focused on the product end of the question-specifically, What theological role and function do the Isaiah quotes (and their variants) play in the Book of Mormon, and what might be learned by a careful literary and theological examination of them? Thanks to the work under discussion, considerable progress has been made toward filling this lacuna.

ID = [81913]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Bradley, Don. “Building the Temple of Nephi: Early Mormon Perceptions of Cumorah and the New Jerusalem.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

As a new faith’s purported “Gold Bible” began rolling off the presses at the E. B. Grandin print shop, the public was curious to know the nature of that faith. Protestant sects proliferated wildly during the Second Great Awakening, particularly in the fertile soil of upstate New York’s “Burned-over District:’ And restorationists, like the Christian primitivist Disciples of Christ, who aimed to restore the New Testament Church, were a familiar breed among them. Such sects provided the best model for what the public might expect Palmyra’s new faith to become, but actual information was still hard to come by.

ID = [81914]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Stokes, Adam Oliver. “‘Skin’ or ‘Scales’ of Blackness? Semitic Context as Interpretive Aid for 2 Nephi 4:35 (LOS 5:21).” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

Few verses in the Book of Mormon are as problematic and controversial as 2 Nephi 4:35 (LDS 5:21). Critics of the Book of Mormon have routinely pointed to this verse and its reference to Lamanites receiving a “skin of blackness” as evidence of racism and racist theology in Mormonism’s sacred scriptures. The verse has also failed to escape ridicule in pop-cultural depictions of Mormonism, as seen most recently in the hit Broadway musical, The Book of Mormon. The verse and its interpretation are of perennial interest to readers of the Book of Mormon, believing or not, since the racial stance of the volume seems to center around the interpretation of the passage.

ID = [81915]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Clayson, Jocelyn Jones. “Tools and Instruments.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

In Alma 26:2, the Nephite Christian missionary Ammon asks his brothers, “What great blessings has [God] bestowed upon us? Can ye tell?” Having been quite successful in his endeavors, Ammon answers his own question by stating that he and his brothers “have been made instruments in the hands of God” (Alma 26:3). The phrasing seems self-explanatory: Ammon and his brothers are tools God uses to “bring about this great work’’ (Alma 26:3).1 Yet just a verse later, Ammon appears to confuse the metaphor when he commends his brothers: “The field is ripe and blessed are ye, for ye did thrust in the sickle, and did reap with your might” (Alma 26:5). Here, it is not the missionaries who are instruments, but rather they are the ones who use instruments. Are Ammon and his brethren tools in the hands of God? Or do they use tools (sickles) to reap a harvest of souls? And what does it mean to be an “instrument”? Using this passage as a springboard, I will look more generally at the use of language concerning tools, instruments, and weapons in the writings attributed to Mormon in the Book of Mormon. Key, in my view, is a comparison, carefully woven, between the sons of Mosiah and the Anti-Nephi-Lehies.

ID = [81916]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Keogh, Benjamin. “‘With the help of these’: Words of Mormon 1 :18.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

The little book entitled Words of Mormon has long been a puzzle, including as it does a number of ambiguous passages and two seemingly distinct parts. In this brief note, I focus primarily on just one such ambiguity-Mormon’s use of “these” in verse 18-in an attempt to show that the whole of the book is much more complete and coherent than has been previously thought. It may be also that the Lord’s “wise purpose[s]” (Words of Mormon 1:7) are more expansive than has generally been supposed. In verse 18, Mormon notes three causes behind the establishment of peace among King Benjamin’s people: (1) “these;’ (2) Benjamin’s labor “with all [his] might…and… faculty,” and (3) “the prophets.” The most immediate question is, To what does “these” refer? One option is verse 16’s “the holy prophets.” However, given the specific mention of “the prophets” as the third cause, this first approach seems unlikely.

ID = [81917]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Embry, Jessie, J. Spencer Fluhman, and D. Morgan Davis. “End Matter.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
ID = [81918]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. “A Book of Mormon Bibliography for 2017.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 27 (2018).
Display Abstract  

The Maxwell Institute continues to make efforts to collect bibliographical information for all writings of a scholarly nature focused on the Book of Mormon in a substantial way. The work for this year’s bibliography has been undertaken by Amanda Buessecker. The editors would again like to encourage readers of the Journal to send information regarding any publications of a scholarly nature focused on the Book of Mormon that have escaped our attention. These can be sent to jbms@byu.edu.

ID = [81919]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2018-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies Volume 28. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
ID = [81888]  Status = Type = book, compendium  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 16  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05

Articles

Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. “Front Matter.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
ID = [81920]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Turley, Kylie N. “Alma’s Hell: Repentance, Consequence, and the Lake of Fire and Brimstone.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

Alma The Younger’s missionary journey to Ammonihah is one of the most disturbing episodes in the Book of Mormon: scriptures are burned (Alma 14:8); converted males are “cast out” and stoned by former friends (Alma 14:7); Amulek, a respected citizen, and Alma, high priest of the church and retired chief judge, are spit upon, mocked, imprisoned, stripped naked, humiliated, starved, and beaten (Alma 14:4-22); and innocent women and children are “cast into the fire” and burned to death (Alma 14:8). Alma and Amulek are “carried… forth to the place of martyrdom;’ and forced to “witness” (Alma 14:9) the “pains of the women and children’’ as they are “consuming in the fire” (Alma 14:10). These events, the Ammonihahite disregard for human life, and the fire are horrifying and extraordinarily cruel.

ID = [81921]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Talmage, Jeremy. “Black, White, and Red All Over: Skin Color in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

In June of 1830, the first Latter-day Saint missionary Samuel Smith journeyed through the backcountry of western New York hoping to find parties interested in the recently published Book of Mormon. Advertising the volume as “a history of the origin of the Indians;’ he attempted to sell copies of the book his brother Joseph claimed to have translated from golden plates given to him by an angel. An etiological tale of the ancient inhabitants of the continent, the Book of Mormon described the emergence of two tribes: the righteous Nephites and wicked Lamanites. After the Lamanites’ rebellion against their relatives, the Book of Mormon recounted how God afflicted them for their iniquity. Whereas they were once “white, and exceedingly fair and delightsome;’ they became cursed with “a skin of blackness.” In the ensuing ethnic conflict, the black-skinned Lamanites ultimately triumphed over their “white” kin, overrunning and annihilating the Nephites to become the ancestors of modern-day Native Americans.

ID = [81922]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Berkey, Kimberly M. “Narrative Doubling and the Structure of Helaman.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

The Book of Helaman is a segment of the Book of Mormon whose study is both imperative and complicated in underappreciated ways. The imperative behind the book of Helaman’s study lies in the text’s significance for the self-conception of the Book of Mormon as well as its mythmaking function for the early Saints in their imaginative mapping of the American West. Like the Book of Mormon, Helaman traffics in buried texts that disclose signs and covenants and makes explicit the latent Lamanite frame that undergirds the Book of Mormon as a whole. It presents, as well, the Book of Mormon’s most robust account of secret combinations-a group that then entranced the text’s earliest readers to such a degree that they used this characterization to imbue their landscape with religious significance, describing the mountains surrounding the Salt Lake Valley as “the abode of the spirits of Gadianton robbers.” To understand the Book of Mormon’s sense of itself as a material artifact, to clarify the theological status of the Lamanites, and to explore the way the Book of Mormon helped sculpt a sense of place for early Latter-day Saints, close attention to the book of Helaman is an unavoidable prerequisite.

ID = [81923]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Belnap, Daniel L. “‘And he was Anti-Christ’: The Significance of the Eighteenth Year of the Reign of the Judges, Part 2.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

For the Nephites, the sixteenth year of the reign of the judges was tremendously difficult. The arrival of the people of Ammon, in itself an incredible disruption of Nephite society, precipitated a battle, which Mormon describes as a “tremendous battle; yea, even such an one as never had been known among all the people in the land from the time Lehi left Jerusalem’’ (Alma 28:2). The dead, we are told, were not counted due to their enormous number. These events compounded the pre-existing struggles that resulted from the sociopolitical fallout from the reforms of Mosiah. Though Alma 30:5 suggests that all is well in Zarahemla during the seventeenth year of the reign of the judges, the events of the next year and half, the eighteenth year, belie this peace. Within this span, the Nephites exploded in two separate, but related, political conflagrations: (1) the secession of the inhabitants of Antionum from the greater Nephite community, and (2) the civil war spearheaded by Amalickiah. But prior to both of these events came Korihor.

ID = [81924]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Swift, Charles. “‘The Lord slayeth the wicked’: Coming to Terms with Nephi Killing Laban.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

Many would agree that the most disturbing narrative in all of the Book of Mormon is that of Nephi being commanded to slay Laban. Few encourage their friends to turn to that passage when introducing the book. It is the rather detailed account of what appears to be an unconscionable act. Its closest parallel elsewhere in scripture is the story of Abraham and Isaac, with the all-important difference that, for Nephi, there was no ram in the thicket. How can we justify a man coming upon another man lying in a street, completely helpless, incapacitated because he is passed out from being drunk, and that first man decapitating the second man, stealing his sword and clothing, and then impersonating him so he could steal a most precious item from his treasury and lead one of his servants away from his household? On the surface, this is what appears to be happening. The fact that Nephi feels led by the Spirit to commit this act may be of little comfort to us as members of society since “few, if any of us, would want to live in a society where individual citizens are free to kill drunken fellow citizens-however guilty the drunk may be-because the citizen feels he has been constrained by God to do so.”

ID = [81925]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Peters, John Durham. “Arno Schmidt among Comic Commentators on the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

Arno Schmidt (1914-1979) was one of the most important, prolific, and original of postwar German authors. His magnum opus, Zettels Traum (1970), appeared in 1,360 large-font, signed typescript copies that each weighed 12 kilos and resembled another intimidating modernist text, James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake, in its experiments with genre, fascinating density, multilingual citations, jokey allusiveness, and mythic grandeur. Like Joyce, Schmidt pushed boundaries of all kinds and sometimes got into hot water with those who found his writings sexually and religiously indecent. As an author, his work is hard to classify; he is sometimes called an “avant-garde traditionalist:’ In personal belief, he was an atheist, though one who was curious about the many forms that belief can take; he opens his essay on the Book of Mormon, for instance, by confessing his soft spot for holy books. A fierce critic of both West and East Germany, he was politically neither a Marxist, nor a social democrat, nor a straight-up conservative, though his attacks on mass society and choice to live his last two decades in relative isolation in a remote hamlet in Lower Saxony have led some critics to detect conservative sympathies. But he was also a clear anti-Nazi and was disgusted at what his country had done. Perhaps by living in a remote spot with his wife, Alice, also a writer whose work was not appreciated until later, he simply wanted to maintain his artistic integrity and stay aloof from the cultural establishment. By any account, he was a lone wolf, anxious not to be pinned down.

ID = [81926]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Kelling, Arno Schmidt Hans-Wilhelm, John Durham Peters, and Joseph M. Spencer. “The Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

If perhaps I am certain of nothing else, I am indeed certain of one thing: I cannot resist holy books. Understand me correctly, however. I regard all of them highly-the fiery bass voices of the Qur’an; Gautama’s all-tolerating claptrap of wisdom; the large compendium of Jewish cultural history called the Old Testament-but I refuse steadfastly to link the word “truth’’ with any of them. Whoever imagines that he possesses the truth has lost it in that very same instant. Truth has no meaning for us. Nothing would be more unfortunate than some kind of 5 percent clause of the Spirit, and nothing more ridiculous than when one prophet calls out another as a fanatic. Not one Church, but rather fundamentally Churches; not one Sacred Scripture, but rather numerous Sacred Scriptures. Hence, if you wish, a resigned-but in my experience quite therapeutic-agnosticism as foundation, yet at the same time a tireless hunt for one’s own mistakes and one’s own lack of knowledge-and, besides that, working diligently.

ID = [81927]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Frederick, Nicholas J. “The Bible and the Book of Mormon: A Review of Literature.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

The enigmatic relationship between the Book of Mormon and the Bible goes all the way back to one of its earliest reviewers, Restorationist Alexander Campbell, who noted inconsistencies between the two. Campbell addressed the Book of Mormon text’s conflation of the Old and New Covenants, differing on details such as Jesus’s birthplace and, in particular, how much the Book of Mormon’s pre-Christian peoples anticipated New Testament events. The Book of Mormon prophet Lehi, Campbell wrote, “developed the records of Matthew, Luke, and John, six hundred years before John the Baptist was born.” From the time of Campbell and into the present day, much of Book of Mormon scholarship has pivoted around this issue. How could a text that claims origins prior to the canonization of the New Testament interact so explicitly with the New Testament text? And what of the Old Testament content, in particular Isaiah, strewn throughout its pages? For many years, those who saw the Book of Mormon as purely the product of the mind of Joseph Smith interpreted these interactions as a sign of indirect influence at best and plagiarism at worst. In response, those who were willing to subscribe to divine origins developed several possible solutions, such as the ideas that Book of Mormon authors had access to “untainted” biblical manuscripts that have since disappeared; or that they had a level of prescience in writing. However, in recent years, this apologetic-or-critical sentiment of arguing why the Bible is present in the Book of Mormon has begun to wane in favor of further exploring how the Bible is present in the Book of Mormon. The intent of this literature review is to lay out the different scholarship trajectories related to the presence of the Bible in the Book of Mormon.

ID = [81928]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Welch, Rosalynde Frandsen. “How to Do Things with Doubt.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

With fears of faith crisis and disaffection rising like seawater, Latter-day Saint apologetic discourse has gone forth, like Noah’s dove, in search of living branches in which the sap runs. Defenders of the faith, including those addressed here, have returned with new academic sophistication, new critical interpretations, and new methods to address doubt among Latter-day Saints. In this review essay, I propose a pair of critical terms, the semantic and the performative, with which to consider this new apologetic discourse. I open with a brief reading of chapters 8 and 11 of 1 Nephi-Lehi’s dream of the tree and Nephi’s messianic vision-which, I’ll argue, offer a neat bifocal lens with which to consider these two modes of religious expression.

ID = [81929]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Stuart, Joseph R. “Reading Race, Reading Scripture: Assessing Recent Historical Works on Race and the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

Different approaches to reading The Book of Mormon have influenced the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ teachings from 1830 to the present day. Scholars have long recognized that the definition of “Lamanites,” one of the primary groups described in the book, has shaped missionary work, Church policy, and public outreach. Indeed, in the Doctrine and Covenants, Joseph Smith received a revelation sending four missionaries to preach “among the Lamanites,” perhaps the first justification for preaching among Indigenous peoples. Recent teachings have expanded the definition of Lamanite to include Native and Indigenous peoples on both American continents as well as Polynesians

ID = [81930]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,d-c,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Rogers, Chris. “A Review of the Afro-Asiatic:Uto-Aztecan Proposal.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

The purpose of this piece is to review the long-distance genetic linguistic relationship between languages of the Afro-Asiatic language family and the Uto-Aztecan language family suggested in Stubbs’s Exploring the Explanatory Power of Semitic and Egyptian in Uto-Aztecan and Changes in Languages from Nephi to Now. While such a suggestion is not novel, a linguistic connection between the New World and the Old World is especially appealing to readers of the Book of Mormon. Such a connection can potentially provide a way to determine specific cultural and social facts about the peoples and civilizations described throughout the Book of Mormon. Nevertheless, when not established by rigorous methods and scientific principles, such proposals lead to the incorrect identification of genetic linguistic relationships and unfounded extra-linguistic conclusions.

ID = [81931]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Weeden, Kirk. “‘Lifted up in the pride of their eyes’: Pride and Cultural Distinction in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

Latter-day Saints affirm that “the Book of Mormon was… written for our day.” For the believer, it is no wonder that the book contains numerous accounts of inequality. Without exception, the dynamic force in these accounts is pride, which in most cases is manifest in cultural pretentiousness and exhibitionism. While the various faces and consequences of pride and its relationship to culture in the Book of Mormon have been the subject of Latter-day Saint literature, there has, to date, been no reading of the Book of Mormon that attempts to provide a structural account of pride and its relationship to culture-that is to say, no analysis of the systematic relationship between the two. To do so would require reading the Book of Mormon with a sociological lens, an approach that, at least for the purposes of this paper, might be regarded as complementary to a theological interpretation.

ID = [81932]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Ulrich, Michael. “King Mosiah’s Address.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

King Benjamin’s address is well known to readers of the Book of Mormon and is often quoted in devotional contexts. The address marks the transition between two great kings of Nephite history: Benjamin and Mosiah. It is also a moment of teaching and of testimony for the old king. From that point on, the people are officially called by the name of Christ. Another moment of teaching and of popular commitment occurs in the Book of Mosiah, although it receives less attention: the address given by King Mosiah and Alma the Elder when the latter’s people arrive in Zarahemla (reported in Mosiah 25). The aim of this brief research note is to underline commonalities between Mosiah’s address and King Benjamin’s address and to suggest that both form part of a larger trend in Nephite institutions, a trend that changes the depth of Nephite religious and political institutions.

ID = [81933]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. “End Matter.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
ID = [81934]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. “A Book of Mormon Bibliography for 2018.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 28 (2019).
Display Abstract  

Balli, Tyler. “LDS Hispanic Americans and Lamanite Identity.” Religious Educator: Perspectives on the Restored Gospel 19/3 (2018): 92-115. Belnap, Daniel L. “The Abinadi Narrative, Redemption, and the Struggle for Nephite Identity:’ In Abinadi: He Came Among Them in Disguise, edited by Hopkin, 27-66.

ID = [81935]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2019-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 16:59:05
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies Volume 8 Issue 2. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1999).
Display Abstract  

Bell reviews the following books about Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon: Susan Easton Black and Charles D. Tate Jr.’s edited volume Joseph Smith: The Prophet, the Man; Scot Facer Proctor and Maurine Jensen Proctor’s edition of The Revised and Enhanced History of Joseph Smith by His Mother; John W. Welch and Stephen D. Ricks’s edited volume King Benjamin’s Speech: “That Ye May Learn Wisdom”; and Donald W. Parry and John W. Welch’s edited volume Isaiah in the Book of Mormon.

ID = [2739]  Status = Type = book  Date = 1999-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 13  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:36

Articles

Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “Contributors.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1992).
ID = [3003]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  farms-jbms  Size: 4591  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Sorenson, John L. “The Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1992).
Display Abstract  

Introduction to the current issue.

ID = [3004]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  farms-jbms,sorenson  Size: 5373  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Wilson, Marian Robertson. “Leroy Robertson and the Oratorio from the Book of Mormon: Reminiscences of a Daughter.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1992).
Display Abstract  

Marian Robertson Wilson recounts her memories of her father, Leroy Robertson, and of the creation of his masterpiece, the Oratorio from the Book of Mormon. The idea to compose an oratorio based on the Book of Mormon first came to Robertson when Elder Melvin J. Ballard of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles casually suggested it to him one day in 1919. After his conversation with Elder Ballard, Robertson dedicated much of his time to studying the Book of Mormon and choosing sections of scripture to use in his compilation. The piece eventually received attention from LDS church leadership and from the renowned Maurice Abravanel. It significantly impacted missionary work, as well as the work of other LDS composers.

ID = [3005]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size: 42722  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Hedges, Andrew H. “All My Endeavors to Preserve Them: Protecting the Plates in Palmyra, 22 September-December 1827.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1992).
Display Abstract  

After Joseph Smith received the gold plates from the angel Moroni, he had to take great measures to protect them from people who wanted to steal them for their monetary value. Although Joseph did not leave much documentation of such experiences, the people who were closely associated with him at the time did. Using what records still exist, Hedges pieces together some of the stories of Joseph’s challenges in obtaining and protecting the gold plates.

ID = [3006]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size: 51188  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Seely, David Rolph, and Jo Ann H. Seely. “Lehi and Jeremiah: Prophets, Priests, and Patriarchs.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1992).
Display Abstract  

Old Testament prophet Jeremiah and Book of Mormon prophet Lehi were contemporaries, and both preached repentance to the people of Jerusalem. Despite their common love for the truth, these men led very different lives because the first was commanded to remain in Jerusalem and the latter was commanded to leave. This article examines the lives and teachings of Jeremiah and Lehi and compares them to each other, suggesting that Jeremiah’s life symbolizes God’s justice and that Lehi’s life symbolizes God’s mercy.

ID = [3007]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms,old-test  Size: 66307  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Welch, John W. “Weighing and Measuring in the Worlds of the Book of Mormon.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8, no. 2 (1999): 36-45, 86.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This article addresses the seemingly misplaced discussion of weights and measures in the middle of Alma 11 in the Book of Mormon. Although the interruption initially seems strange, John Welch offers new insights to explain its purpose in the Book of Mormon. For instance, knowledge of the Nephite monetary system supplements a reader’s comprehension of the bribery and corruption that occurred in that society. Evidence of this monetary system also shows a link between Near Eastern civilizations and Book of Mormon civilizations, thus providing further evidence for the divinity of Joseph Smith’s work.

Keywords: Ancient Near East; Bribery; Corruption; Economic; Economy; Money; Nephite; Weights and Measures
ID = [3008]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1999-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms,welch  Size: 47943  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Smith, Robert F. “Table of Relative Values.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8, no. 2 (1999): 46.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

This table compares Nephite weights and measures with Egyptian values and gives possible equivalents in grams and ounces.

Keywords: Ancient Near East; Economics; Economy; Egypt; Nephite; Weights and Measures
ID = [3009]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1999-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 1729  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Sorenson, John L. “A Mesoamerican System of Weights and Measures? Did the ancient peoples of Mesoamerica use a system of weights and scales in measuring goods and their values?” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1992).
Display Abstract  

Ancient Mesoamericans used some systems of weights and measures; items in the market, though, were usually sold by volume. The Mesoamerican weights and measures may coincide with the weights and measures described in Alma 11 of the Book of Mormon, but more research is necessary in order to make conclusive claims.

ID = [3010]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms,sorenson  Size: 27131  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Packard, Dennis J., and Sandra Packard. “Pondering the Word.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8, no. 2 (1999): 48-69, 86.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Despite the emphasis that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints places on scriptures, particularly the Book of Mormon, some members find it difficult to truly love the scriptures. This article claims that by pondering the scriptures often, members can better understand and appreciate the prophetic words. In order to find a deeper love for the scriptures, readers should consider the following details while reading: the setting of a passage; the meaning of various words and phrases; the author’s attitude when he wrote the passage; the possible comparisons between passages; the possible implied messages of the authors; the possible reasons for the inclusion of a specific passage; the organization of the scriptures; the repetition of ideas, words, and sounds; and the emphasis of certain words. By pondering each of these aspects, readers can gain a greater love for and appreciation of the scriptures.

Keywords: Emphasis; Organization; Ponder; Repetition; Scripture; Scripture Study; Structure
ID = [3011]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1999-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 51551  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Bitton, Davis. “B. H. Roberts and Book of Mormon Scholarship.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1992).
Display Abstract  

Brigham Henry Roberts, a Book of Mormon scholar in the early twentieth century, was a pioneer in his field. He conducted research regarding the culture and the geography of the Book of Mormon peoples in an attempt to determine the setting of the Book of Mormon. His extensive work in this area has significantly influenced the progress of Book of Mormon research. Roberts also enthusiastically defended the book when others criticized it. He was able to do so effectively because of his study of and familiarity with the Book of Mormon. Roberts did, however, have a few limitations, the most detrimental being his unfounded assumption that “the narrow neck of land” in the Book of Mormon is the Isthmus of Panama. Yet, Roberts’s pioneering efforts remain today a crucial catalyst to modern analytical studies of the Book of Mormon.

ID = [3012]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size: 56040  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Godfrey, Kenneth W. “What is the Significance of Zelph in the Study of Book of Mormon Geography?” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8, no. 2 (1999): 70-79, 88.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

In June 1834, members of Zion’s Camp discovered skeleton bones that Joseph Smith reportedly revealed as belonging to a “white Lamanite” named Zelph. Many Latter-day Saints have referenced this unearthing as evidence that the Book of Mormon took place in North America, rather than in Mesoamerica. This article explores the significance and reliability of the accounts concerning Zelph’s existence, and it claims that although such a discovery is exciting and insightful, many of the accounts are inconsistent and most of the details surrounding Zelph and his life remain unknown. The skeleton cannot, therefore, provide conclusive evidence for anything, and Latter-day Saints should remember that more important than identifying the location of Book of Mormon events is strengthening their belief in the book’s divinity.

Keywords: Ancient America; Archaeology; Book of Mormon Geography; Book of Mormon Geography – Heartland; Early Church History; Joseph; Jr.; Lamanite; Mesoamerica; Smith; Zelph; Zion’s Camp
ID = [3013]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1999-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 36821  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Raish, Martin H. “A Reader’s Library.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1992).
Display Abstract  

This author requests help in compiling a list of useful reference books that readers can use when studying the Book of Mormon. Such a list would include dictionaries, encyclopedias, and atlases.

ID = [3014]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size: 10115  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “Out of the Dust.” Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 8 no. 2 (1992).
Display Abstract  

This article examines several interesting discoveries pertaining to the Book of Mormon.

Anthony W. Ivins suggests that the Jaredites may not have been completely extinct, that Coriantumr, the alleged last Jaredite, may have had children with Mulekite women after he discovered the people of Zarahemla.

A wooden vessel that was found in Lake Michigan turns out to be a prototype of a proposed “sea-going tow barge” developed in World War II for the Navy.

Arrowheads discovered in Israel show that steel was in use by about 1000 BC; the name Aha was engraved with steel on one arrowhead, thus giving a Hebrew-language source for this name found in the Book of Mormon.

Researchers have found similarities between the Anthon Transcript and Old South Arabian (Arabic).

ID = [3015]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 1992-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size: 18797  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:38
“Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture: New Issue Released.” Insights 32, no. 4 (2012).
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

The second issue of the Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture for 2012 features five articles that delve into aspects of words in the Book of Mormon. The cover design reflects that unifying theme and presents word in various languages and scripts.

Keywords: journal; Book of Mormon; articles; theme; language
ID = [66657]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2012-01-04  Collections:  bom,farms-insights  Size:   Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 11:05:38
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture Volume 17 Issue 1. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 17 no. 1 (2008).
Display Abstract  

The Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture is a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to promoting understanding of the history, meaning, and significance of the scriptures and other sacred texts revealed through the Prophet Joseph Smith.

ID = [2755]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2008-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 7  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:36

Articles

Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. “Authors.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 17 no. 1 (2008).
ID = [3220]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2008-01-01  Collections:  farms-jbms  Size: 3806  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Hedges, Andrew H. “Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 17 no. 1 (2008).
Display Abstract  

The editor gives a brief history of the Journal and gives his vision for the future of the publication.

ID = [3221]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2008-01-01  Collections:  farms-jbms  Size: 6761  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. “Editors.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 17 no. 1 (2008).
ID = [3222]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2008-01-01  Collections:  farms-jbms  Size: 3547  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Szink, Terrence L. “The Vision of Enoch: Structure of a Masterpiece.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 17, no. 1–2 (2008): 6–19.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

The seventh chapter of the Book of Moses portrays Enoch’s vision of the history and future of the world within a specific literary framework. The text, coming from the Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible, outlines three periods of time: (1) the days of Noah, (2) the meridian of time, and (3) the last days. The portrayal of each of these time periods contains five similar characteristics. Szink also compares this text with accounts in the Bible and other nonbiblical sources to further understand the vision and the significance of its framework. By presenting the three periods in a literary art form, the author has created a complex beauty that reflects and reinforces the content of the vision.

Keywords: Creation; Dream; Enoch (Prophet); Joseph Smith Translation; Last Days; Literary; Literature; Meridian of Time; Vision
ID = [2655]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2008-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,farms-jbms,moses  Size: 47507  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:36
Belnap, Daniel L. “‘I Will Contend with Them That Contendeth with Thee’: The Divine Warrior in Jacob’s Speech of 2 Nephi 6–10.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 17, no. 1-2 (2008): 20-39.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

At the time Jacob gave his speech in 2 Nephi 6–10, the Nephites had already been driven from two lands of inheritance and felt an ongoing concern of being cut off from God’s promises. Belnap illustrates that Jacob’s speech answers these concerns through emphasizing and expounding on the covenantal relationship made possible by God acting as the Divine Warrior. Jacob quotes Isaiah passages in his discourse and in some instances makes his own additions to emphasize important aspects. He illustrates how the Divine Warrior provides the hardships, knowledge, and power for an individual to become a divine warrior, and he discusses the Divine Warrior’s defeat over the monster of Death. The promises made by the Divine Warrior can provide hope and assurance to all.

Keywords: Death; Divine Warrior; Jacob (Son of Lehi); Land of Inheritance; Monster; Nephite; Promise
ID = [3224]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2008-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 77003  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Gee, James. “The Nahom Maps.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 17, no. 1-2 (2008): 40-57.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Several maps from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries support details of Lehi’s journey as recorded in the Book of Mormon. In 1751, the renowned cartographer Jean Baptiste Bourguignon D’Anville became the first to include Nahom (or Nehem), Ishmael’s burial place in the Book of Mormon, in his map of Asia. This map and a 1771 map of Yemen are the basis for most accurate maps of Arabia from 1751 to 1814. The spelling varies among the subsequent maps, with most using either D’Anville’s Nehem or Niebuhr’s Nehhm, but the location of Nahom does not differ between those maps that include Nahom. The mention of Nahom on the finest maps by the greatest cartographers of the times, in a location that corresponds to Lehi’s account, gives credence to Lehi’s travels.

Keywords: Arabia; Cartography; Ishmael; Map; Nahom; Yemen
ID = [3225]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2008-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 19479  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Aston, Warren P. “Identifying Our Best Candidate for Nephi’s Bountiful.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 17 no. 1 (2008).
Display Abstract  

Scholars have presented and defended different viewpoints concerning the Lehite journey and the location of Nephi’s Bountiful. Aston explains that some of these arguments contain factual errors, such as claims regarding fertility and timber for Nephi’s ship and a lack of accounting for all possibilities. Discrepancies in theories and differences in opinion do not lessen the worth of all that has been found in Arabia and the supported theories, but acknowledging the sometimes contrary data will aid the search for the best candidate for Nephi’s Bountiful.

ID = [3226]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2008-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size: 20323  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture Volume 18 Issue 1. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 18 no. 1 (2009).
Display Abstract  

The Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture is a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to promoting understanding of the history, meaning, and significance of the scriptures and other sacred texts revealed through the Prophet Joseph Smith.

ID = [2756]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 7  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:36

Articles

Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. “Contributors.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 18 no. 1 (2009).
ID = [3227]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  farms-jbms  Size: 3805  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies. “Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 18 no. 1 (2009).
Display Abstract  

Summary of current issue.

ID = [3228]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  farms-jbms  Size: 4752  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Strathearn, Gaye, and Jacob Moody. “Christ’s Interpretation of Isaiah 52’s ‘My Servant’ in 3 Nephi.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 18, no. 1 (2009): 4-15.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Many interpretations exist about who the “suffering servant” in many of Isaiah’s writings might be. Interpretations for this figure include Isaiah himself, the people of Israel, Joseph Smith, and Jesus Christ. Without arguing against these understandings of the servant, this paper claims that Christ, in 3 Nephi 20–23, personifies the servant as the Book of Mormon. Both the servant and the Book of Mormon are portrayed as filling the same “great and marvelous” works in the gathering of Israel, reminding the Jews of their covenants with God, and bringing the Gentiles to Christ.

Keywords: Covenant; Interpretation; Jesus Christ; Savior; Suffering Servant
ID = [3229]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms,old-test  Size: 39458  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
McGuire, Benjamin L. “Nephi and Goliath: A Case Study of Literary Allusion in the Book of Mormon.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 18, no. 1 (2009): 16-31.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

When authors use the rhetorical device of literary allusion, they not only teach through their own words but also attach to their own text meanings and interpretations from the alluded text. This is true of Nephi’s allusion to the account of David and Goliath in Nephi’s own account of his killing Laban, which allusion is generally of a thematic nature. A few of the main thematic parallels between the two accounts are that both unbelieving Israel and Laman and Lemuel are fearful of the main antagonist, both David and Nephi prophesy the death of their opponent, and both Goliath and Laban have their heads cut off and armor stripped. The implications of this allusion run deep. At a time in which the right to kingship was continually in dispute between Nephi and Laman, Nephi casting himself as David—the archetypal king of Judah, whose faith led to his supplanting Saul—could be seen as legitimizing his regal authority over Laman.

Keywords: Allusion; Authority; Goliath; King David; Kingship; Laban; Laman (Son of Lehi); Literature; Nephi (Son of Lehi)
ID = [3230]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 66418  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Boyce, Duane. “Were the Ammonites Pacifists?” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 18, no. 1 (2009): 32-47.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

One of the most moving accounts in the Book of Mormon is of the people of Ammon, their covenant to bury and never use again their weapons of war, their faith to sacrifice themselves instead of fighting back against their Lamanite brethren, and their sacrifice to send their children to war to aid the Nephites. Some interpret the stance that the Ammonites took against war to be pacifist. Some indications point toward this conclusion: their burying their weapons, covenanting never to fight again, allowing themselves to be slaughtered twice, and being motivated in these actions out of love for their Lamanite kin. However, when the text is read more carefully, it can easily be seen that further actions would not necessarily have reflected a pacifist view toward war: not objecting to the Nephite war in their defense, providing Nephite soldiers with food and supplies, and sending their own sons into battle would surely indicate that their personal opposition to war stemmed from the covenants they made during repentance.

Keywords: Ammonite; Conversion; Covenant; Lamanite; Pacifism; People of Ammon; Repentance; Sacrifice; Warfare
ID = [3231]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 59523  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Hoskisson, Paul Y. “It Is OK Not to Have Every Answer: The Book of Mormon Onomastic Ending -(i)hah.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 18 no. 1 (2009).
Display Abstract  

In our search for understanding, it is often instructive to determine what something does not mean. This is the case with the ending on some Book of Mormon names, -(i)hah. Because one of the most common names ending with -(i)hah is Moronihah, the son of Moroni, it might be tempting to understand these names as patronymic; however, of eleven names with the suffix -(i)hah, Moronihah is the only occurrence in which the father is known. The case of the brothers Mathoni and Mathonihah also casts doubt on this interpretation. The suffix -(i)hah can also be interpreted as a shortened form of Jehovah, yhwh. For this to occur, however, -i(j)ah would have to switch to -(i)hah through metathesis, which is extremely rare in Semitic languages. Among other arguments against this understanding are that there are no instances in the corpus in which -(i)hah is used as a shortened form of Jehovah and, with one possible exception, no geographical name compounds with yhwh, as -(i)hah does in the Book of Mormon. Although this leaves the question currently unresolved, the use of sound methodology has helped to settle what -(i)hah is not, which will ultimately aid in determining what it is.

ID = [3232]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size: 39599  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Ball, Terry B. “Letter to the Editor.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 18 no. 1 (2009).
Display Abstract  

A critique of Warren Aston’s “Identifying Our Best Candidate for Nephi’s Bountiful,” published in volume 17/1–2 of the Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture.

ID = [3233]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size: 10855  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture Volume 18 Issue 2. Journal of Book of Mormon Studies 18 no. 2 (2009).
Display Abstract  

The Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture is a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to promoting understanding of the history, meaning, and significance of the scriptures and other sacred texts revealed through the Prophet Joseph Smith.

ID = [2757]  Status = Type = book  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  bom,farms-jbms  Size:   Children: 8  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:36

Articles

Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. “Contributors.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 18 no. 2 (2009).
ID = [3234]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  farms-jbms  Size: 5450  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Hedges, Andrew H. “Editor’s Notebook.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Restoration Scripture 18 no. 2 (2009).
Display Abstract  

Summary of current issue.

ID = [3235]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  farms-jbms  Size: 4789  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Takagi, Shinji. “Proclaiming the Way in Japanese: The 1909 Translation of the Book of Mormon.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture 18, no. 2 (2009): 18-37.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

The early twentieth century found the Japanese language in a state of flux—colloquial Japanese was very slowly beginning to replace classical written Japanese, whose grammar had remained relatively intact for centuries. At this time of change Elder Alma O. Taylor began his 1909 translation of the Book of Mormon. He choose initially to render the text into the colloquial style; however, prodded by his Japanese reviewers, Taylor quickly realized that no publicly praiseworthy translation could be made in colloquial Japanese. The choice to translate the Book of Mormon in the classical language, as well as to have successful Japanese author, Choko Ikuta, review and edit the translation, allowed the 1909 text to accurately portray doctrine as well as to be considered a major literary achievement.

Keywords: Foreign Language Translation; Japanese; Missionary Work
ID = [3237]  Status = Type = journal article  Date = 2009-01-01  Collections:  bmc-archive,bom,farms-jbms  Size: 79384  Children: 0  Rebuilt: 4/17/24 8:42:39
Roper, Matthew P. “Early Publications on the Book of Mormon.” Journal of the Book of Mormon and Other Restoration Scripture 18, no. 2 (2009): 38-51.
Display Abstract  Display Keywords

Articles from early newspapers and other publications give rare insights into the way in which the original audience of the Book of Mormon, both believers and critics, viewed the document. A large-scale collection of these documents was not initiated until the 1930s by Francis Kirkham, with encouragement from President George Albert Smith. Kirkham later published his collection in two volumes. His work, while extensive, was not exhaustive. The 19th-Century Publications about the Book of Mormon (1829–1844), a project partnered by the Maxwell Institute and the Harold B. Lee Library, builds off of Kirkham’s original research and seeks to preserve every extant published text discussing the Book of Mormon. The collection includes more than six hundred publications related to the Book of Mormon—almost one million words of text.

Keywords: Book of Mormon; Early Church History